• Quasi-two dimensional itinerant fermions in the Anti-Ferro-Magnetic (AFM) quantum-critical region of their phase diagram, such as in the Fe-based superconductors or in some of the heavy-fermion compounds, exhibit a resistivity varying linearly with temperature and a contribution to specific heat or thermopower proportional to $T \ln T$. It is shown here that a generic model of itinerant AFM can be canonically transformed such that its critical fluctuations around the AFM-vector $Q$ can be obtained from the fluctuations in the long wave-length limit of a dissipative quantum XY model. The fluctuations of the dissipative quantum XY model in 2D have been evaluated recently and in a large regime of parameters, they are determined, not by renormalized spin-fluctuations but by topological excitations. In this regime, the fluctuations are separable in their spatial and temporal dependence and have a dynamical critical exponent $z =\infty.$ The time dependence gives $\omega/T$-scaling at criticality. The observed resistivity and entropy then follow directly. Several predictions to test the theory are also given.
  • We study a minimal model for a relaxor ferroelectric including dipolar interactions, and short-range harmonic and anharmonic forces for the critical modes as in the theory of pure ferroelectrics together with quenched disorder coupled linearly to the critical modes. We present the simplest approximate solution of the model necessary to obtain the principal features of the correlation functions. Specifically, we calculate and compare the structure factor measured by neutron scattering in different characteristic regimes of temperature in the relaxor PbMg$_{1/3}$Nb$_{2/3}$O$_3$.
  • The order parameter and its variations in space and time in many different states in condensed matter physics at low temperatures are described by the complex function $\Psi({\bf r}, t)$. These states include superfluids, superconductors, and a subclass of antiferromagnets and charge-density waves. The collective fluctuations in the ordered state may then be categorized as oscillations of phase and amplitude of $\Psi({\bf r}, t)$. The phase oscillations are the {\it Goldstone} modes of the broken continuous symmetry. The amplitude modes, even at long wavelengths, are well defined and decoupled from the phase oscillations only near particle-hole symmetry, where the equations of motion have an effective Lorentz symmetry as in particle physics, and if there are no significant avenues for decay into other excitations. They bear close correspondence with the so-called {\it Higgs} modes in particle physics, whose prediction and discovery is very important for the standard model of particle physics. In this review, we discuss the theory and the possible observation of the amplitude or Higgs modes in condensed matter physics -- in superconductors, cold-atoms in periodic lattices, and in uniaxial antiferromagnets. We discuss the necessity for at least approximate particle-hole symmetry as well as the special conditions required to couple to such modes because, being scalars, they do not couple linearly to the usual condensed matter probes.
  • The formation of heavy fermion bands can occur by means of the conversion of a periodic array of local moments into itinerant electrons via the Kondo effect and the huge consequent Fermi-liquid renormalizations. Leggett predicted for liquid $^3$He that Fermi-liquid renormalizations change in the superconducting state, leading to a temperature dependence of the London penetration depth~$\Lambda$ quite different from that in the BCS theory. Using Leggett's theory, as modified for heavy fermions, it is possible to extract from the measured temperature dependence of $\Lambda$ in high quality samples both Landau parameters $F_0^s$ and $F_1^s$; this has never been accomplished before. A modification of the temperature dependence of the specific heat $C_\mathrm{el}$, related to that of $\Lambda$, is also expected. We have carefully determined the magnitude and temperature dependence of $\Lambda$ in CeCoIn$_5$ by muon spin relaxation rate measurements to obtain $F_0^s = 36 \pm 1$ and $F_1^s = 1.2 \pm 0.3$, and find a consistent change in the temperature dependence of electronic specific heat $C_\mathrm{el}$. This, the first determination of $F_1^s$ with a value~$\ll F_0^s$ in a heavy fermion compound, tests the basic assumption of the theory of heavy fermions, that the frequency dependence of the self-energy is much more important than its momentum dependence.
  • We show that a finite Hall effect in zero applied magnetic field occurs for partially filled bands in certain time-reversal violating states with zero net flux per unit-cell. These states are the Magneto-chiral states with parameters in the effective one-particle Hamiltonian such that they do not satisfy the Haldane-type constraints for topological electronic states. The results extend an earlier discussion of the Kerr effect observed in the cuprates but may be applicable to other experimental situations.
  • The optical effects due to the loop-current order parameter in under-doped cuprates are studied in order to understand the recent observation of unusual birefringence in electromagnetic propagation in under-doped cuprates. It is shown why birefringence occurs even in multiple domains of order with size of domains much smaller than the wave-length and in twinned samples. Not only is there a rotation of polarization of incident light but also a rotation of the principal optical axis from the crystalline axes. Both are calculated in relative agreement with experiments in terms of the same parameters. The magnitude of the effect is orders of magnitude larger than the unusual Kerr effect observed in under-doped cuprates earlier. The new observations, including their comparison with the Kerr effect, test the symmetry of the proposed order decisively and confirm the conclusions from polarized neutron scattering.
  • We study the free energy landscape of a minimal model for relaxor ferroelectrics. Using a variational method which includes leading correlations beyond the mean-field approximation as well as disorder averaging at the level of a simple replica theory, we find metastable paraelectric states with a stability region that extends to zero temperature. The free energy of such states exhibits an essential singularity for weak compositional disorder pointing to their necessary occurrence. Ferroelectric states appear as local minima in the free energy at high temperatures and become stable below a coexistence temperature $T_c$. We calculate the phase diagram in the electric field-temperature plane and find a coexistence line of the polar and non-polar phases which ends at a critical point. First-order phase transitions are induced for fields sufficiently large to cross the region of stability of the metastable paraelectric phase. These polar and non-polar states have distinct structure factors from those of conventional ferroelectrics. We use this theoretical framework to compare and to gain physical understanding of various experimental results in typical relaxors.
  • A brief summary of collective mode excitations that can exist in singlet superconductors with irreducible representation $L$ is given. Such excitations may be classified as the coupled excitations of the charge density $\rho$ and the phase $\phi $ of the order parameter, or of the amplitude $\Delta$ of order parameter. Each of these classes may be further characterized in the long wavelength limit by the irreducible representation $\ell$ of the excitation, which may or may not be the same as the ground state $L$.
  • Super-high resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d (Bi2212) superconductors to investigate momentum dependence of electron coupling with collective excitations (modes). Two coexisting energy scales are clearly revealed over a large momentum space for the first time in the superconducting state of an overdoped Bi2212 superconductor. These two energy scales exhibit distinct momentum dependence: one keeps its energy near 78 meV over a large momentum space while the other changes its energy from $\sim$40 meV near the antinodal region to $\sim$70 meV near the nodal region. These observations provide a new picture on momentum evolution of electron-boson coupling in Bi2212 that electrons are coupled with two sharp modes simultaneously over a large momentum space in the superconducting states. Their unusual momentum dependence poses a challenge to our current understanding of electron-mode-coupling and its role for high temperature superconductivity in cuprate superconductors.
  • A d-wave superconducting phase with coexisting intra-unit-cell orbital current order has the remarkable property that it supports finite size Fermi pockets of Bougoliubov quasiparticles. Experimentally detectable consequences of this include a residual $T$-linear term in the specific heat in the absence of disorder and residual features in the thermal and microwave conductivity in the low disorder limit.
  • The dissipative XY model in two spatial dimensions belongs to a new universality class of quantum critical phenomena with the remarkable property of the decoupling of the critical fluctuations in space and time. We have shown earlier that the quantum critical point is driven by proliferation in time of topological configurations that we termed warps. We show here that a warp may be regarded as a configuration of a monopoles surrounded symmetrically by anti-monopoles so that the total charge of the configuration is zero. Therefore the interaction with other warps is local in space. They however interact with other warps at the same spatial point logarithmically in time. As a function of dissipation warps unbind leading to a quantum phase transition. The critical fluctuations are momentum independent but have power law correlations in time.
  • The concept of "broken symmetry", that the symmetry of the vacuum may be lower than the Hamiltonian of a quantum theory, plays an important role in modern physics. A manifestation of this phenomena is the Higgs boson in particle physics whose long awaited discovery is imminent. An equivalent mode in superconductors is implicit in the early theories of their collective fluctuations. Spurred by some mysterious experimental results, the theory of the oscillation of the amplitude of superconductivity order parameter, which is the equivalent to the Higgs modes in s-wave superconductors and its identification in the experiments, was explicitly provided. It was also shown that a necessary condition for this to occur is the emergent Lorentz invariance in the superconducting state while the metallic state and the region just below $T_c$ is manifestly non-Lorentz invariant. Here we show that d-wave superconductors, such as the high temperature Cuprate superconductors, should have a rich assortment of Higgs bosons, each in a different irreducible representation of the point-group symmetries of the lattice. We also show that these modes have a characteristic singular spectral structure which can be discovered in Raman scattering experiments.
  • The collective modes observed in the loop-current ordered state in under-doped cuprates by polarized neutron scattering require that the ground state is a linear combination in each unit-cell of the four basis states which are the possible classical magnetic moment configurations in each unit-cell. The direction of such moments is in the c-axis of the crystals. The basis states are connected by both time-reversal as well as spatial rotations about the center of the unit-cells. Several new features arise in the theory of polarized neutron scattering cross-section in this situation which appear not to have been encountered before. An important consequence of these is that a finite component transverse to the classical magnetic moment directions is detected in the experiments. We show that this transverse component is of purely quantum-mechanical origin and that its direction in the plane normal to the c-axis is not detectable, even in principle, in experiments, at least in the quantum-mechanical model we have adopted. We estimate the direction of the "tilt" in the moment, i.e. the ratio of the transverse component to the c-axis component, using parameters of the ground state obtained by fitting to the observed dispersion of the collective modes in the ordered state. We can obtain reasonable agreement with experiments but only by introducing a parameter for which only an approximate magnitude can be estimated. Approximate calculations of the form-factors are also provided.
  • Recently two branches of weakly dispersive collective modes have been discovered in under-doped cuprates by inelastic neutron scattering. Polarization analysis reveals that the modes are magnetic excitations. They are only visible for temperatures below the transition temperature to a broken symmetry phase which was discovered earlier and their intensity increases as temperature is further decreased. The broken symmetry phase itself has symmetries consistent with ordering of orbital current loops within a unit-cell without breaking translational symmetry. In order to calculate the collective modes of such a state we add quantum terms to the Ashkin-Teller (AT) model with which the classical loop current order has been described. We derive that the mean field ground state of the quantum model is a product over all unit-cells of linear combination of the four possible classical configurations of the loop current order in each unit-cell. The collective modes are calculated by using a generalized Holstein-Primakoff boson representation of orbital moment operators and lead to three branches of gapped weakly dispersive collective modes. The experimental results are consistent with the two lower energy branches; the third mode is at a higher energy than looked for by present neutron scattering experiments and might also be over-damped. Implications of the discovery of the collective modes are discussed.
  • We consider the Anomalous Hall (AH) state induced by interactions in a three-orbital per unit-cell model. To be specific we consider a model appropriate for the Copper-Oxide lattice to highlight the necessary conditions for time-reversal breaking states which are AH states and which are not. We compare the singularities of the wave-functions of the three-orbital model, which are related to the nonzero Berry curvature, and their variation with a change of gauge to those in the two-orbital model introduced in a seminal paper by Haldane. Explicit derivation using wave-functions rather than the more powerful abstract methods may provide additional physical understanding of the phenomena.
  • Motivated by the experimental measurement of electrical and hall conductivity, thermopower and Nernst effect, we calculate the longitudinal and transverse electrical and heat transport in graphene in the presence of unitary scatterers as well as charged impurities. The temperature and carrier density dependence in this system display a number of anomalous features that arise due to the relativistic nature of the low energy fermionic degrees of freedom. We derive the properties in detail including the effect of unitary and charged impurities self-consistently, and present tables giving the analytic expressions for all the transport properties in the limit of small and large temperature compared to the chemical potential and the scattering rates. We compare our results with the available experimental data. While the qualitative variations with temperature and density of carriers or chemical potential of all transport properties can be reproduced, we find that a given set of parameters of the impurities fits the Hall conductivity, Thermopower and the Nernst effect quantitatively but cannot fit the conductivity quantitatively. On the other hand a single set of parameters for scattering from Coulomb impurities fits conductivity, hall resistance and thermopower but not Nernst.
  • Super-high resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been performed on a high temperature superconductor Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8. The band back-bending characteristic of the Bogoliubov-like quasiparticle dispersion is clearly revealed at low temperature in the superconducting state. This makes it possible for the first time to experimentally extract the complex electron self-energy and the complex gap function in the superconducting state. The resultant electron self-energy and gap function exhibit features at ~54 meV and ~40 meV, in addition to the superconducting gap-induced structure at lower binding energy and a broad featureless structure at higher binding energy. These information will provide key insight and constraints on the origin of electron pairing in high temperature superconductors.
  • We show that the two branches of collective modes discovered recently in under-doped Cuprates with huge spectral weight are a necessary consequence of the loop-current state. Such a state has been shown in earlier experiments to be consistent with the symmetry of the order parameter competing with superconductivity in four families of Cuprates. We also predict a third branch of excitations and suggest techniques to discover it. Using parameters to fit the observed modes, we show that the direction of the effective moments in the ground state lies in a cone at an angle to the c-axis as observed in experiments.
  • One of the canons of condensed matter physics is the Onsager Reciprocity principle in systems in which the Hamiltonian commutes with the time-reversal operator. Recent results of measurements of the Nernst coefficient in underdoped YBa_2Cu_30_{6+x}, together with the measurements of the anisotropy of conductivity and the inferred anisotropy of the thermopower, imply that this principle is violated. The probable violation and its temperature dependence are shown to be consistent with the Loop-current phase which has been directly observed in other experiments. The violation is related directly to the magneto-electric symmetry of such a phase in which an applied electric field generates an effective magnetic field at right angle to it and to the order parameter vector, and vice versa.
  • We consider the thermal expansion, change of sound velocity with pressure and temperature, and the Poisson ratio of lattices which have rigid units (polyhedra very large stiffness to change in bond-length and to bond-angle variations) connected to other such units through relatively compressible polyhedra. We show that in such a model, the potential energy for rotations of the rigid units can occur only as a function of the combination ${\boldsymbol \Theta}_i \equiv ({\boldsymbol \theta}_i - (\nabla \times {\bf u}_i)/2)$, where ${\boldsymbol \theta_i} $ are the orthogonal rotation angles of the rigid unit $i$ and ${\bf u}_i$ is its displacement. Given such new invariants in the theory of elasticity and the hierarchy of force constants of the model, a negative thermal expansion coefficient as well as a decrease in the elastic constants of the solid with temperature and pressure is shown to follow. These are consistent with the observations.
  • We have performed large-scale Monte Carlo simulations on a two-dimensional generalized Ashkin-Teller model to calculate the thermodynamic properties in the critical region near its transitions. The Ashkin-Teller model has a pair of Ising spins at each site which interact with neighboring spins through pair-wise and 4-spin interactions. The model represents the interactions between orbital current loops in $Cu O_2$-plaquettes of high-$T_c$ cuprates, which order with a staggered magnetization $\Mso$ inside each unit-cell in the underdoped region of the phase diagram below a temperature $T^*(x)$ which depends on doping. The pair of Ising spins per unit-cell represent the directions of the currents in the links of the current loops. The generalizations are the inclusion of anisotropy in the pair-wise nearest neighbor current-current couplings consistent with the symmetries of a square lattice and the next nearest neighbor pair-wise couplings. We use the Binder cumulant to estimate the correlation length exponent $\nu$ and the order parameter exponent $\beta$. Our principal results are that in a range of parameters, the Ashkin-Teller model as well as its generalization has an order parameter susceptibility which diverges as $T \to T^*$ and an order parameter below $T^*$. Importantly, however, there is no divergence in the specific heat. This puts the properties of the model in accord with the experimental results in the underdoped cuprates. We also calculate the magnitude of the "bump" in the specific heat in the critical region to put limits on its observability. Finally, we show that the staggered magnetization couples to the uniform magnetization $M_0$ such that the latter has a weak singularity at $T^*$ and also displays a wide critical region, also in accord with recent experiments.
  • Marginal Fermi liquid was originally introduced as a phenomenological description of the cuprates in a part of the metallic doping range which appears to be governed by fluctuations due to a quantum-critical point. An essential result due to the form of the assumed fluctuation spectra is that the large inelastic quasiparticle relaxation rate near the Fermi-surface is proportional to the energy measured from the chemical potential, $\tau_i^{-1}\propto\epsilon$. We present a microscopic long-wavelength derivation of the hydrodynamic properties in such a situation by an extension of the procedure that Eliashberg used for the derivation of the hydrodynamic properties of a Landau-Fermi-liquid. In particular, the density-density and the current-current correlations and the relation between the two are derived, and the connection to microscopic calculations of the frequency dependence of the optical conductivity with an additional fermi-liquid correction factor shown to follow. The method used here may be necessary, quite generally, for the correct hydrodynamic theory for any problem of quantum-critical fluctuations in fermions.
  • We discuss the necessary symmetry conditions and the different ways in which they can be physically realized for the occurrence of ferromagnetism accompanying the loop current orbital magnetic order observed by polarized neutron-diffraction experiments or indeed any other conceivable principal order in the under-doped phase of cuprates. We contrast the Kerr effect experiments in single crystals observing ferromagnetism with the direct magnetization measurements in large powder samples, which do not observe it. We also suggest experiments to resolve the differences among the experiments, all of which we believe to be correct.
  • The conventional interpretation of the recent magneto-oscillation experiments in underdoped Cuprates, requires that there be a state of altered translational symmetry in the pseudogap state which is not supported by structural and Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments. I show here that the observed oscillations may be reconciled with the conclusion arrived in ARPES experiments that the fermi-surface, suitably defined, has the shape of four arcs which shrink to four points as $T \to 0$. Experiments, including infrared absorption in a magnetic field, are suggested to distinguish between such a state from that obtained by the conventional interpretation of the magneto-oscillations.
  • We calculate the screening charge density distribution due to a point charge, such as that of a positive muon ($\mu^+$), placed between the planes of a highly anisotropic layered metal. In underdoped hole cuprates the screening charge converts the charge density in the metallic-plane unit cells in the vicinity of the $\mu^+$ to nearly its value in the insulating state. The current-loop ordered state observed by polarized neutron diffraction then vanishes in such cells, and also in nearby cells over a distance of order the intrinsic correlation length of the loop-ordered state. This in turn strongly suppresses the loop-current field at the $\mu^+$ site. We estimate this suppressed field in underdoped YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6+x}$ and La$_{2-x}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$, and find consistency with the observed 0.2--0.3 G field in the former case and the observed upper bound of $\sim$0.2 G in the latter case. This resolves the controversy between the neutron diffraction and $\mu$SR experiments. The screening calculation also has relevance for the effect of other charge impurities in the cuprates, such as the dopants themselves.