• The Sino-French space mission SVOM (Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is mainly designed to detect and localize Gamma-Ray Burst events (GRBs). The satellite, to be launched late 2021, embarks a set of gamma-ray, X-ray and optical imagers. Thanks to its pointing strategy, quick slew capability and fast data connection to earth, ground based observations with large telescopes will allow us to measure redshifts for an unprecedented sample of GRBs. We discuss here the overall science goals of the SVOM mission in the framework of the multi-wavelength and multi-messenger panorama of the next decade. Finally we show how some developments of the SVOM mission will be helpful for the THESEUS project.
  • We present the discovery and interpretation of ionized nebulae around two ultraluminous X-ray sources in M 51; both sources share the rare property of showing X-ray eclipses by their companion stars, and are therefore prime targets for follow-up studies. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope images, we found an elongated, 100-pc-long emission-line structure associated with one X-ray source (CXOM51 J132940.0+471237; ULX-1 for simplicity), and a more circular, ionized nebula at the location of the second source (CXOM51 J132939.5+471244; ULX-2 for simplicity). We observed both nebulae with the Large Binocular Telescope's Multi-Object Double Spectrograph. From our analysis of the optical spectra, we argue that the gas in the ULX-1 bubble is shock-ionized, consistent with the effect of a jet with a kinetic power of $\approx$2 $\times 10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Additional X-ray photo-ionization may also be present, to explain the strength of high-ionization lines such as He II $\lambda 4686$ and [Ne V] $\lambda 3426$. On the other hand, the emission lines from the ULX-2 bubble are typical for photoionization by normal O stars suggesting that the nebula is actually an H II region not physically related to the ULX but is simply a chance alignment. From archival Very Large Array data, we also detect spatially extended, steep-spectrum radio emission at the location of the ULX-1 bubble (consistent with its jet origin), but no radio counterpart for ULX-2 (consistent with the lack of shock-ionized gas around that source).
  • $\gamma$ Cas is the prototype of a small population of B0-B1.5 III-V classical Be (cBe) stars that emit anomalous and hard X-rays with a unique array of properties. $\gamma$ Cas is known to host, like other cBe stars, a decretion disk and also a low mass companion. Recently Postnov et al. have posited that this companion is a magnetized rapidly spinning neutron star that deflects direct gravitational accretion from a stellar/disk wind via the "propeller mechanism." These authors state that the key X-ray observations are "remarkably well produced" in this scenario. We reexamine this mechanism in detail and conclude that there are a number of fatal objections in its application to the $\gamma$ Cas case. Among other considerations these issues include the prediction under the propeller scenario of a much smaller population of $\gamma$ Cas stars than is observed and the lack of allowance for observed correlations of X-ray and UV and/or optical properties over a variety of timescales.
  • We lay the foundations of a statistical framework for multi-catalogue cross-correlation and cross-identification based on explicit simplified catalogue models. A proper identification process should rely on both astrometric and photometric data. Under some conditions, the astrometric part and the photometric part can be processed separately and merged a posteriori to provide a single global probability of identification. The present paper addresses almost exclusively the astrometrical part and specifies the proper probabilities to be merged with photometric likelihoods. To select matching candidates in n catalogues, we used the Chi (or, indifferently, the Chi-square) test with 2(n-1) degrees of freedom. We thus call this cross-match a chi-match. In order to use Bayes' formula, we considered exhaustive sets of hypotheses based on combinatorial analysis. The volume of the Chi-test domain of acceptance -- a 2(n-1)-dimensional acceptance ellipsoid -- is used to estimate the expected numbers of spurious associations. We derived priors for those numbers using a frequentist approach relying on simple geometrical considerations. Likelihoods are based on standard Rayleigh, Chi and Poisson distributions that we normalized over the Chi-test acceptance domain. We validated our theoretical results by generating and cross-matching synthetic catalogues. The results we obtain do not depend on the order used to cross-correlate the catalogues. We applied the formalism described in the present paper to build the multi-wavelength catalogues used for the science cases of the ARCHES (Astronomical Resource Cross-matching for High Energy Studies) project. Our cross-matching engine is publicly available through a multi-purpose web interface. In a longer term, we plan to integrate this tool into the CDS XMatch Service.
  • ARCHES (Astronomical Resource Cross-matching for High Energy Studies) is a FP7-Space funded project whose aim is to provide the international astronomical community with well-characterised multi-wavelength data in the form of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for large samples of objects extracted from the 3XMM DR5 X-ray catalogue of serendipitous sources. The project has developed new tools implementing fully probabilistic simultaneous cross-correlation of several catalogues for unresolved sources and a multi-wavelength finder for clusters of galaxies for extended sources. These enhanced resources have been tested in the framework of several science cases.
  • Thanks to the large collecting area (3 x ~1500 cm$^2$ at 1.5 keV) and wide field of view (30' across in full field mode) of the X-ray cameras on board the European Space Agency X-ray observatory XMM-Newton, each individual pointing can result in the detection of hundreds of X-ray sources, most of which are newly discovered. Recently, many improvements in the XMM-Newton data reduction algorithms have been made. These include enhanced source characterisation and reduced spurious source detections, refined astrometric precision, greater net sensitivity and the extraction of spectra and time series for fainter sources, with better signal-to-noise. Further, almost 50\% more observations are in the public domain compared to 2XMMi-DR3, allowing the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (XMM-SSC) to produce a much larger and better quality X-ray source catalogue. The XMM-SSC has developed a pipeline to reduce the XMM-Newton data automatically and using improved calibration a new catalogue version has been produced from XMM-Newton data made public by 2013 Dec. 31 (13 years of data). Manual screening ensures the highest data quality. This catalogue is known as 3XMM. In the latest release, 3XMM-DR5, there are 565962 X-ray detections comprising 396910 unique X-ray sources. For the 133000 brightest sources, spectra and lightcurves are provided. For all detections, the positions on the sky, a measure of the quality of the detection, and an evaluation of the X-ray variability is provided, along with the fluxes and count rates in 7 X-ray energy bands, the total 0.2-12 keV band counts, and four hardness ratios. To identify the detections, a cross correlation with 228 catalogues is also provided for each X-ray detection. 3XMM-DR5 is the largest X-ray source catalogue ever produced. Thanks to the large array of data products, it is an excellent resource in which to find new and extreme objects.
  • Long considered as the "odd man out" among X-ray emitting Be stars, \gamma Cas (B0.5e IV) is now recognized as the prototype of a class of stars that emit hard thermal X-rays. Our classification differs from the historical use of the term "gamma Cas stars" defined from optical properties alone. The luminosity output of this class contributes significantly to the hard X-ray production in massive stars in the Galaxy. The gamma Cas stars have light curves showing variability on a few broadly-defined timescales and spectra indicative of an optically thin plasma consisting of one or more hot thermal components. By now 9--13 Galactic \approx B0-1.5e main sequence stars are judged to be members or candidate members of the \gamma Cas class. Conservative criteria for this designation are for a \approxB0-1.5e III-V star to have an X-ray luminosity of 10^{32}--10^{33} ergs s^{-1}, a hot thermal spectrum containing the short wavelength Ly \alpha FeXXV and FeXXVI lines and the fluorescence FeK feature all in emission. If thermality cannot be demonstrated, for example from either the presence of these Ly \alpha lines or curvature of the hard continuum; these are the gamma Cas candidates. We discuss the history of the discovery of the complicated characteristics of the variability in the optical, UV, and X-ray domains, leading to suggestions for the physical cause of the production of hard X-rays. These include scenarios in which matter from the Be star accretes onto a degenerate secondary star and interactions between magnetic fields on the Be star and its decretion disk. The greatest aid to the choice of the causal mechanism is the temporal correlations of X-ray light curves and spectra with diagnostics in the optical and UV wavebands. We show why the magnetic star-disk interaction scenario is the most tenable explanation for the creation of hard X-rays on these stars.
  • We present the Micro-channel X-ray Telescope (MXT), a new narrow-field (about 1{\deg}) telescope that will be flying on the Sino-French SVOM mission dedicated to Gamma-Ray Burst science, scheduled for launch in 2021. MXT is based on square micro pore optics (MPOs), coupled with a low noise CCD. The optics are based on a "Lobster Eye" design, while the CCD is a focal plane detector similar to the type developed for the seven eROSITA telescopes. MXT is a compact and light (<35 kg) telescope with a 1 m focal length, and it will provide an effective area of about 45 cmsq on axis at 1 keV. The MXT PSF is expected to be better than 4.2 arc min (FWHM) ensuring a localization accuracy of the afterglows of the SVOM GRBs to better than 1 arc min (90\% c.l. with no systematics) provided MXT data are collected within 5 minutes after the trigger. The MXT sensitivity will be adequate to detect the afterglows for almost all the SVOM GRBs as well as to perform observations of non-GRB astrophysical objects. These performances are fully adapted to the SVOM science goals, and prove that small and light telescopes can be used for future small X-ray missions.
  • The nature of the low- to intermediate-luminosity (Lx$\,\sim 10^{32-34}$ erg s$^{-1}$) source population revealed in hard band (2-10 keV) X-ray surveys of the Galactic Plane is poorly understood. To overcome such problem we cross-correlated the XMM-Newton 3XMM-DR4 survey with the infrared 2MASS and GLIMPSE catalogues. We identified reliable X-ray-infrared associations for 690 sources. We selected 173 sources having hard X-ray spectra, typical of hard X-ray high-mass stars (kT$\,>\,5\,$keV), and 517 sources having soft X-ray spectra, typical of active coronae. About $18\,\%$ of the soft sources are classified in the literature: $\sim\,91\%$ as stars, with a minor fraction of WR stars. Roughly $15\,\%$ of the hard sources are classified in the literature: $\sim\,68\%$ as high-mass X-ray stars single or in binary systems (WR, Be and HMXBs), with a small fraction of G and B stars. We carried out infrared spectroscopic pilot observations at the William Herschel Telescope for five hard X-ray sources. Three of them are high-mass stars with spectral types WN7-8h, Ofpe/WN9 and Be, and Lx$\sim\,10^{32}-10^{33}$erg s$^{-1}$. One source is a colliding-wind binary, while another source is a colliding-wind binary or a supergiant fast X-ray transient in quiescence. The Be star is a likely $\gamma$-Cas system. The nature of the other two X-ray sources is uncertain. The distribution of hard X-ray sources in the parameter space made of X-ray hardness ratio, infrared colours and X-ray-to-infrared flux ratio suggests that many of the unidentified sources are new $\gamma$-Cas analogues, WRs and low Lx HMXBs. However, the nature of the X-ray population with Ks $\geq$ 11 and average X-ray-to-infrared flux ratio remains unconstrained.
  • This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of accreting white dwarfs. For a summary, we refer to the paper.
  • This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of magnetospheres of isolated neutron stars. For a summary, we refer to the paper.
  • Most ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) display a typical set of properties not seen in Galactic stellar-mass black holes (BHs): higher luminosity Lx > 3 10^39 erg/s, unusually soft X-ray components (kT < 0.3 keV) and a characteristic downturn in their spectra above ~ 5 keV. Such puzzling properties have been interpreted either as evidence of intermediate-mass BHs, or as emission from stellar-mass BHs accreting above their Eddington limit, analogous to some Galactic BHs at peak luminosity. Recently, a very soft X-ray spectrum has been observed in a rare and transient stellar-mass BH. Here we show that the X-ray source P13 in the galaxy NGC\,7793 is in a ~ 64 day period binary and exhibits all three canonical properties of ULXs. By modelling the strong optical and UV modulations due to X-ray heating of the B9Ia donor star, we constrain the BH mass to less than 15 solar masses. Our results demonstrate that in P13, soft thermal emission and spectral curvature are indeed signatures of supercritical accretion. By analogy, ULXs with similar X-ray spectra and luminosities of up to a few 10^40 erg/s can be explained by supercritical accretion onto massive stellar BHs.
  • Many different classes of X-ray sources contribute to the Galactic landscape at high energies. Although the nature of the most luminous X-ray emitters is now fairly well understood, the population of low-to-medium X-ray luminosity (Lx = 10^27-10^34 erg/s) sources remains much less studied, our knowledge being mostly based on the observation of local members. The advent of wide field and high sensitivity X-ray telescopes such as XMM-Newton now offers the opportunity to observe this low-to-medium Lx population at large distances. We report on the results of a Galactic plane survey conducted by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC). Beyond its astrophysical goals, this survey aims at gathering a representative sample of identified X-ray sources at low latitude that can be used later on to statistically identify the rest of the serendipitous sources discovered in the Milky Way. The survey is based on 26 XMM-Newton observations, obtained at |b| < 20 deg, distributed over a large range in Galactic longitudes and covering a summed area of 4 deg2. The flux limit of our survey is 2 x 10-15 erg/cm^2/s in the soft (0.5 - 2 keV) band and 1 x 10^-14 erg/cm^2/s in the hard (2 - 12 keV) band. We detect a total of 1319 individual X-ray sources. Using optical follow-up observations supplemented by cross-correlation with a large range of multi-wavelength archival catalogues we identify 316 X-ray sources. This constitutes the largest group of spectroscopically identified low latitude X-ray sources at this flux level. The majority of the identified X-ray sources are active coronae with spectral types in the range A - M at maximum distances of ~ 1 kpc. The number of identified active stars increases towards late spectral types, reaching a maximum at K. (abridged)
  • M. Feroci, J.W. den Herder, E. Bozzo, D. Barret, S. Brandt, M. Hernanz, M. van der Klis, M. Pohl, A. Santangelo, L. Stella, A. Watts, J. Wilms, S. Zane, M. Ahangarianabhari, A. Alpar, D. Altamirano, L. Alvarez, L. Amati, C. Amoros, N. Andersson, A. Antonelli, A. Argan, R. Artigue, P. Azzarello, G. Baldazzi, S. Balman, M. Barbera, T. Belloni, G. Bertuccio, S. Bianchi, A. Bianchini, P. Bodin, J.-M. Bonnet Bidaud, S. Boutloukos, J. Braga, E. Brown, N. Bucciantini, L. Burderi, M. Bursa, C. Budtz-Jørgensen, E. Cackett, F.R. Cadoux, P. Cais, G.A. Caliandro, R. Campana, S. Campana, P. Casella, D. Chakrabarty, J. Chenevez, J. Coker, R. Cole, A. Collura, T. Courvoisier, A. Cros, A. Cumming, G. Cusumano, A. D'Aì, V. D'Elia, E. Del Monte, D. De Martino, A. De Rosa, S. Di Cosimo, S. Diebold, T. Di Salvo, I. Donnarumma, A. Drago, M. Durant, D. Emmanoulopoulos, Y. Evangelista, A. Fabian, M. Falanga, Y. Favre, C. Feldman, C. Ferrigno, M. H. Finger, G.W. Fraser, F. Fuschino, D.K. Galloway, J.L. Galvez Sanchez, E. Garcia-Berro, B. Gendre, S. Gezari, A.B. Giles, M. Gilfanov, P. Giommi, G. Giovannini, M. Giroletti, A. Goldwurm, D. Götz, C. Gouiffes, M. Grassi, P. Groot C. Guidorzi, D. Haas, F. Hansen, D.H. Hartmann, C.A. Haswe, A. Heger, J. Homan, A. Hornstrup, R. Hudec, J. Huovelin, A. Ingram, J.J.M. in't Zand, J.Isern, G. Israe, L. Izzo, P. Jonker, P. Kaaret, V. Karas, D. Karelin, D. Kataria, L. Keek, T. Kennedy, D. Klochkov, W. Kluzniak, K. Kokkotas, S. Korpela, C. Kouveliotou, I. Kreykenbohm, L.M. Kuiper, I. Kuvvetli, C. Labanti, D. Lai, F.K. Lamb, F. Lebrun, D. Lin, D. Linder, G. Lodato, F. Longo, N. Lund, T.J. Maccarone, D. Macera, D. Maier, P. Malcovati, V. Mangano, A. Manousakis, M. Marisaldi, A. Markowitz, A. Martindale, G. Matt, I.M. McHardy, A. Melatos, M. Mendez, S. Migliari, R. Mignani, M.C. Miller, J.M. Miller, T. Mineo, G. Miniutti, S. Morsink, C. Motch, S. Motta, M. Mouchet, F. Muleri, A.J. Norton, M. Nowak, P. O'Brien, M. Orienti, M. Orio, M. Orlandini, P. Orleanski, J.P. Osborne, R. Osten, F. Ozel, L. Pacciani, A. Papitto, B. Paul, E. Perinati, V. Petracek, J. Portell, J. Poutanen, D. Psaltis, D. Rambaud, G. Ramsay, M. Rapisarda, A. Rachevski, P.S. Ray, N. Rea, S. Reddy, P. Reig, M. Reina Aranda, R. Remillard, C. Reynolds, P. Rodríguez-Gil, J. Rodriguez, P. Romano, E.M.R. Rossi, F. Ryde, L. Sabau-Graziati, G. Sala, R. Salvaterra, A. Sanna, S. Schanne, J. Schee, C. Schmid, A. Schwenk, A.D. Schwope, J.-Y. Seyler, A. Shearer, A. Smith, D.M. Smith, P.J. Smith, V. Sochora, P. Soffitta, P. Soleri, B. Stappers, B. Stelzer, N. Stergioulas, G. Stratta, T.E. Strohmayer, Z. Stuchlik, S. Suchy, V. Sulemainov, T. Takahashi, F. Tamburini, C. Tenzer, L. Tolos, G. Torok, J.M. Torrejon, D.F. Torres, A. Tramacere, A. Trois, S. Turriziani, P. Uter, P. Uttley, A. Vacchi, P. Varniere, S. Vaughan, S. Vercellone, V. Vrba, D. Walton, S. Watanabe, R. Wawrzaszek, N. Webb, N. Weinberg, H. Wende, P. Wheatley, R. Wijers, R. Wijnands, M. Wille, C.A. Wilson-Hodge, B. Winter, K. Wood, G. Zampa, N. Zampa, L. Zampieri, A. Zdziarski, B. Zhang
    Sept. 7, 2012 astro-ph.IM
    The LOFT mission concept is one of four candidates selected by ESA for the M3 launch opportunity as Medium Size missions of the Cosmic Vision programme. The launch window is currently planned for between 2022 and 2024. LOFT is designed to exploit the diagnostics of rapid X-ray flux and spectral variability that directly probe the motion of matter down to distances very close to black holes and neutron stars, as well as the physical state of ultra-dense matter. These primary science goals will be addressed by a payload composed of a Large Area Detector (LAD) and a Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD is a collimated (<1 degree field of view) experiment operating in the energy range 2-50 keV, with a 10 m^2 peak effective area and an energy resolution of 260 eV at 6 keV. The WFM will operate in the same energy range as the LAD, enabling simultaneous monitoring of a few-steradian wide field of view, with an angular resolution of <5 arcmin. The LAD and WFM experiments will allow us to investigate variability from submillisecond QPO's to year-long transient outbursts. In this paper we report the current status of the project.
  • Our Galaxy harbours a large population of X-ray sources of intermediate to low X-ray luminosity (typically Lx from 10^27 to 10^34 erg/s). At energies below 2 keV, active coronae completely dominate the X-ray landscape. However, the nature and the properties of Galactic sources detected at energies > 2 keV is much less constrained. Optical follow-up spectroscopic observations show that in addition to cataclysmic variables (CVs) and very active stellar coronae, massive stars (colliding wind binaries, quiescent high-mass X-ray binaries and Gamma-Cas analogs) account for a sizable fraction of the Galactic hard X-ray sources at medium flux (Fx > 10^-13 erg/s/cm^2). Cross-correlations of the 2XMM-DR3 catalogue with 2MASS and GLIMPSE confirm the presence above 2 keV of a large population of coronally active binaries, probably of the BY Dra and RS CVn types, in addition to many distant and absorbed massive stars. We also report the results of a specific optical identification campaign aimed at studying the nature of the optically faint hard X-ray sources and at constraining the surface density of black holes (BHs), either isolated and accreting from the interstellar medium or in quiescent binaries. Not astonishingly, most of our sample of 14 optically faint and X-ray hard sources are identified with CVs and Me stars. We do not find any likely counterpart in only three cases. Our observations also allow us to put an upper limit of 0.2 BH deg^-2 at Fx = 1.3 10^-13 erg/s/cm^2 in directions toward the center of our Galaxy. This implies a combined Bondi-Hoyle and mass accretion rate to Lx efficiency of accretion onto black holes of less than 10^-3.
  • \gamma Cas is the prototypical classical Be star and is best known for its variable hard X-ray emission. To elucidate the reasons for this emission, we mounted a multiwavelength campaign in 2010 centered around 4 XMM observations. The observational techniques included long baseline optical interferometry (LBOI), monitoring by an Automated Photometric Telescope and Halpha observations. Because gamma Cas is also known to be in a binary, we measured Halpha radial velocities and redetermined its period as 203.55+/-0.2 days and an eccentricity near zero. The LBOI observations suggest that the star's decretion disk was axisymmetric in 2010, has an inclination angle near 45^o, and a larger radius than previously reported. The Be star began an "outburst" at the beginning of our campaign, made visible by a disk brightening and reddening during our campaign. Our analyses of the new high resolution spectra disclosed many attributes found from spectra obtained in 2001 (Chandra) and 2004 (XMM). As well as a dominant hot 14 keV thermal component, these familiar ones included: (i) a fluorescent feature of Fe K stronger than observed at previous times, (ii) strong lines of N VII and Ne XI lines indicative of overabundances, and (iii) a subsolar Fe abundance from K-shell lines but a solar abundance from L-shell ions. We also found that 2 absorption columns are required to fit the continuum. While the first one maintained its historical average of 1X10^21 cm^-2, the second was very large and doubled to 7.4X10^23 cm^-2 during our X-ray observations. Although we found no clear relation between this column density and orbital phase, it correlates well with the disk brightening and reddening both in the 2010 and earlier observations. Thus, the inference from this study is that much (perhaps all?) of the X-ray emission from this source originates behind matter ejected by gamma Cas into our line of sight.
  • The Survey Science Centre of the XMM-Newton satellite released the first incremental version of the 2XMM catalogue in August 2008 . With more than 220,000 X-ray sources, the 2XMMi was at that time the largest catalogue of X-ray sources ever published and thus constitutes an unprecedented resource for studying the high-energy properties of various classes of X-ray emitters such as AGN and stars. The advent of the 7th release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey offers the opportunity to cross-match two major surveys and extend the spectral energy distribution of many 2XMMi sources towards the optical bands. We here present a cross-matching algorithm based on the classical likelihood ratio estimator. The method developed has the advantage of providing true probabilities of identifications without resorting to Monte-Carlo simulations. Over 30,000 2XMMi sources have SDSS counterparts with individual probabilities of identification higher than 90%. Using spectroscopic identifications from the SDSS DR7 catalogue supplemented by extraction from other catalogues, we build an identified sample from which the way the various classes of X-ray emitters gather in the multi dimensional parameter space can be analysed. We investigate two scientific use cases. In the first example we show how these multi-wavelength data can be used to search for new QSO2s. Although no specific range of observed properties allows us to identify Compton Thick QSO2s, we show that the prospects are much better for Compton Thin AGN2 and discuss several possible multi-parameter selection strategies. In a second example, we confirm the hardening of the mean X-ray spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity on a sample of over 500 X-ray active stars and reveal that on average X-ray active M stars display bluer $g-r$ colour indexes than less active ones (abridged).
  • We have identified the optical counterpart of the ULX source P13 in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 7793. The object is a V ~ 20.5 mag star, ten times brighter than any other established counterpart of a ULX in nearby galaxies. Medium resolution optical spectroscopy carried out in 2008 and 2009 with the ESO-VLT reveals the presence of narrow high order Balmer, HeI and MgII absorption lines indicating a late B type supergiant companion star with mass between 10 and 20 Msol. Stellar H beta and HeII 4686 emission lines are also seen superposed on the photospheric spectrum. We detect different patterns of radial velocity variations from the emission and absorption lines over a time interval of one month. The velocity of the high order Balmer absorption lines changes by ~ 100 km/s while the H beta and HeI 4686 emission components vary by about the same amount but with a different phasing. Assuming that the observed velocity changes trace the motion of the mass-donor star and of the X-ray source implies a mass of the accreting black hole in the range of 3 to 100 Msol with a most probable value of ~ 10 to 20 Msol. We expect an orbital period in the range of 20 to 40 days based on the low density of the supergiant star. P13 is likely in a short-lived, and thus rare high X-ray luminosity evolutionary state associated with the ascension of the donor star onto the supergiant stage.
  • We report the results of an optical campaign carried out by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre with the specific goal of identifying the brightest X-ray sources in the XMM-Newton Galactic Plane Survey of Hands et al. (2004). In addition to photometric and spectroscopic observations obtained at the ESO-VLT and ESO-3.6m, we used cross-correlations with the 2XMMi, USNO-B1.0, 2MASS and GLIMPSE catalogues to progress the identification process. Active coronae account for 16 of the 30 identified X-ray sources. Many of the identified hard X-ray sources are associated with massive stars emitting at intermediate X-ray luminosities of 10^32-34 erg/s. Among these are a very absorbed likely hyper-luminous star with X-ray/optical spectra and luminosities comparable with those of eta Carina, a new X-ray selected WN8 Wolf-Rayet star, a new Be/X-ray star belonging to the growing class of Gamma-Cas analogs and a possible supergiant X-ray binary of the kind discovered recently by INTEGRAL. One of the sources, XGPS-25 has a counterpart which exhibits HeII 4686 and Bowen CIII-NIII emission lines suggesting a quiescent or X-ray shielded Low Mass X-ray Binary, although its properties might also be consistent with a rare kind of cataclysmic variable (CV). We also report the discovery of three new CVs, one of which is a likely magnetic system. The soft (0.4-2.0 keV) band LogN-LogS curve is completely dominated by active stars in the flux range of 1x10^-13 to 1x10^-14 erg/cm2/s. In total, we are able to identify a large fraction of the hard (2-10 keV) X-ray sources in the flux range of 1x10^-12 to 1x10^-13 erg/cm2/s with Galactic objects at a rate consistent with that expected for the Galactic contribution only. (abridged)
  • The remarkable astrometric capabilities of Chandra offer the possibility to measure proper motions of X-ray sources with an unprecedented accuracy in this wavelength range. We recently completed a proper motion survey of three of the seven thermally emitting radio-quiet isolated neutron stars (INSs) discovered in the ROSAT all-sky survey. These INSs (RX J0420.0-5022, RX J0806.4-4123, and RX J1308.6+2127) either lack an optical counterpart or have one so faint that ground based or space born optical observations push the current possibilities of the instrumentation to the limit. Pairs of ACIS observations were acquired 3 to 5 years apart to measure the displacement of the sources on the X-ray sky using as reference the background of extragalactic or remote Galactic X-ray sources. We derive 2 sigma upper limits of 123 mas/yr and 86 mas/yr on the proper motion of RX J0420.0-5022 and RX J0806.4-4123, respectively. RX J1308.6+2127 exhibits a very significant displacement (~ 9 sigma) yielding mu = 220 +/- 25 mas/yr, the second fastest measured among all ROSAT discovered INSs. The source is probably moving away rapidly from the Galactic plane at a speed which precludes any significant accretion of matter from the interstellar medium. Its transverse velocity of ~ 740 (d/700pc) km/s might be the largest of all ROSAT INSs and its corresponding spatial velocity stands among the fastest recorded for neutron stars. RX J1308.6+2127 is thus a middle-aged (age ~ 1 My) high velocity cooling neutron star. We investigate its possible origin in nearby OB associations or from a field OB star. In most cases, the flight time from birth place appears significantly shorter than the characteristic age derived from spin down rate. The distribution in transverse velocity of ROSAT INSs is not statistically different from that of normal radio pulsars.
  • Aims: Pointed observations with XMM-Newton provide the basis for creating catalogues of X-ray sources detected serendipitously in each field. This paper describes the creation and characteristics of the 2XMM catalogue. Methods: The 2XMM catalogue has been compiled from a new processing of the XMM-Newton EPIC camera data. The main features of the processing pipeline are described in detail. Results: The catalogue, the largest ever made at X-ray wavelengths, contains 246,897 detections drawn from 3491 public XMM-Newton observations over a 7-year interval, which relate to 191,870 unique sources. The catalogue fields cover a sky area of more than 500 sq.deg. The non-overlapping sky area is ~360 sq.deg. (~1% of the sky) as many regions of the sky are observed more than once by XMM-Newton. The catalogue probes a large sky area at the flux limit where the bulk of the objects that contribute to the X-ray background lie and provides a major resource for generating large, well-defined X-ray selected source samples, studying the X-ray source population and identifying rare object types. The main characteristics of the catalogue are presented, including its photometric and astrometric properties .
  • We have analysed data from five XMM-Newton observations of XB 1254-69, one of them simultaneous with INTEGRAL, to investigate the mechanism responsible for the highly variable dips durations and depths seen from this low-mass X-ray binary. Deep dips were present during two observations, shallow dips during one and no dips were detected during the remaining two observations. At high (1-4 s) time resolution ``shallow dips'' are seen to include a few, very rapid, deep dips whilst the ``deep'' dips consist of many similar very rapid, deep, fluctuations. The folded V-band Optical Monitor light curves obtained when the source was undergoing deep, shallow and no detectable dipping exhibit sinusoid-like variations with different amplitudes and phases. We fit EPIC spectra obtained from "persistent" or dip-free intervals with a model consisting of disc-blackbody and thermal comptonisation components together with Gaussian emission features at 1 and 6.6 keV modified by absorption due to cold and photo-ionised material. None of the spectral parameters appears to be strongly correlated with the dip depth except for the temperature of the disc blackbody which is coolest (kT ~ 1.8 keV) when deep dips are present and warmest (kT ~ 2.1 keV) when no dips are detectable. We propose that the changes in both disc temperature and optical modulation could be explained by the presence of a tilted accretion disc in the system. We provide a revised estimate of the orbital period of 0.16388875 +/- 0.00000017 day.
  • NGC 1313 X-2 is one of the brightest ultraluminous X-ray sources in the sky, at both X-ray and optical wavelengths; therefore, quite a few studies of available ESO VLT and HST data have appeared in the literature. Here, we present our analysis of VLT/FORS1 and HST/ACS photometric data, confirming the identification of the B ~ 23 mag blue optical counterpart. We show that the system is part of a poor cluster with an age of 20 Myr, leading to an upper mass limit of some 12 M_sun for the mass donor. We attribute the different results with respect to earlier studies to the use of isochrones in the F435W and F555W HST/ACS photometric system that appear to be incompatible with the corresponding Johnson B and V isochrones. The counterpart exhibits significant photometric variability of about 0.2 mag amplitude, both between the two HST observations and during the one month of monitoring with the VLT. This includes variability within one night and suggests that the light is dominated by the accretion disk in the system and not by the mass donor.
  • Multiwavelength studies of the seven identified X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs) offer a unique opportunity to investigate their surface thermal and magnetic structure and the matter-radiation interaction in presence of strong gravitational and magnetic fields. As a part of an ongoing campaign aimed at a complete identification and spectral characterization of XDINSs in the optical band, we performed deep imaging with the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the field of the XDINS RBS1774 (1RXS J214303.7 +065419). The recently upgraded FORS1 instrument mounted on the VLT provided the very first detection of a candidate optical counterpart in the B band. The identification is based on a very good positional coincidence with the X-ray source (chance probability ~2E-3). The source has B=27.4 +/- 0.2 (1 sigma confidence level), and the optical flux exceeds the extrapolation of the X-ray blackbody at optical wavelengths by a factor ~35 (+/- 20 at 3sigma confidence level). This is barely compatible with thermal emission from the neutron star surface, unless the source distance is d~200-300 pc, and the star is an almost aligned rotator or its spin axis is nearly aligned with the line of sight. At the same time, such a large optical excess appears difficult to reconcile with rotation-powered magnetospheric emission, unless the source has an extremely large optical emission efficiency. The implications and possible similarities with the optical spectra of other isolated NSs are discussed.
  • The unprecedented spatial resolution of the Chandra observatory opens the possibility to detect with relatively high accuracy proper motions at X-ray wavelengths. We have conducted an astrometric study of three of the "Magnificent Seven", the thermally emitting radio quiet isolated neutron stars (INSs) discovered by ROSAT. These three INSs (RX J0420.0-5022, RX J0806.4-4123 and RX J1308.6+2127/RBS 1223) either lack an optical counterpart or have one too faint to be used for astrometric purposes. We obtained ACIS observations 3 to 5 years apart to constrain or measure the displacement of the sources on the X-ray sky using as reference the background of extragalactic or remote galactic X-ray sources. Upper limits of 138 mas/yr and 76 mas/yr on the proper motion of RX J0420.0-5022 and RX J0806.4-4123, respectively, have already been presented in Motch et al. (2007). Here we report the very significant measurement (~ 10 sigma) of the proper motion of the third INS of our program, RX J1308.6+2127/RBS1223. Comparing observations obtained in 2002 and 2007 reveals a displacement of 1.1 arcsec implying a yearly proper motion of 223 mas, the second fastest measured for the ROSAT discovered INSs. The source is rapidly moving away from the galactic plane at a speed which precludes any significant accretion of matter from the interstellar medium. Its transverse velocity of ~ 740 (d/700pc) km/s might be the largest of the "Magnificent Seven" and among the fastest recorded for neutron stars. RX J1308.6+2127/RBS1223 is thus a young high velocity cooling neutron star. The source may have its origin in the closest part of the Scutum OB2 association about 0.8 Myr ago, an age consistent with that expected from cooling curves, but significantly younger than inferred from pulse timing measurements (1.5 Myr).