• In this work we present new APEX/SEPIA Band-5 observations targeting the CO ($J=2\text{-}1$) emission line of 24 Herschel-detected galaxies at $z=0.1-0.2$. Combining this sample {with} our recent new Valpara\'iso ALMA Line Emission Survey (VALES), we investigate the star formation efficiencies (SFEs = SFR/$M_{\rm H_{2}}$) of galaxies at low redshift. We find the SFE of our sample bridges the gap between normal star-forming galaxies and Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs), which are thought to be triggered by different star formation modes. Considering the $\rm SFE'$ as the SFR and the $L'_{\rm CO}$ ratio, our data show a continuous and smooth increment as a function of infrared luminosity (or star formation rate) with a scatter about 0.5 dex, instead of a steep jump with a bimodal behaviour. This result is due to the use of a sample with a much larger range of sSFR/sSFR$_{\rm ms}$ using LIRGs, with luminosities covering the range between normal and ULIRGs. We conclude that the main parameters controlling the scatter of the SFE in star-forming galaxies are the systematic uncertainty of the $\alpha_{\rm CO}$ conversion factor, the gas fraction and physical size.
  • Using Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations of 89 QSO sightlines through the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint, we study the relationships between C IV absorption systems and the properties of nearby galaxies as well as large-scale environment. To maintain sensitivity to very faint galaxies, we restrict our sample to 0.0015 < z < 0.015, which defines a complete galaxy survey to L > 0.01 L* or stellar mass log M_* > 8 Msun. We report two principal findings. First, for galaxies with impact parameter rho < 1 rvir, C IV detection strongly depends on the luminosity/stellar mass of the nearby galaxy. C IV is preferentially associated with galaxies with log M_* > 9.5 Msun; lower mass galaxies rarely exhibit significant C IV absorption (covering fraction f = 9 +12-6% for 11 galaxies with log M_* < 9.5 Msun). Second, C IV detection within the log M_* > 9.5 Msun population depends on environment. Using a fixed-aperture environmental density metric for galaxies with rho < 160 kpc at z < 0.055, we find that 57+/-12% (8/14) of galaxies in low-density regions (regions with fewer than seven L > 0.15 L* galaxies within 1.5 Mpc) have affiliated C IV absorption; however, none (0/7) of the galaxies in denser regions show C IV. Similarly, the C IV detection rate is lower for galaxies residing in groups with dark-matter halo masses of log Mhalo > 12.5 Msun. In contrast to C IV, H I is pervasive in the CGM without regard to mass or environment. These results indicate that C IV absorbers with log N(C IV) > 13.5 cm^-2 trace the halos of log M_* > 9.5 Msun galaxies but also reflect larger scale environmental conditions.
  • To investigate the evolution of metal-enriched gas over recent cosmic epochs as well as to characterize the diffuse, ionized, metal-enriched circumgalactic medium (CGM), we have conducted a blind survey for C IV absorption systems in 89 QSO sightlines observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). We have identified 42 absorbers at z < 0.16, comprising the largest uniform blind sample size to date in this redshift range. Our measurements indicate an increasing C IV absorber number density per comoving path length (dN/dX = 7.5 +/- 1.1) and modestly increasing mass density relative to the critical density of the Universe (Omega(C IV) = 10.0 +/- 1.5 x 10^-8 ) from z ~ 1.5 to the present epoch, consistent with predictions from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Furthermore, the data support a functional form for the column density distribution function that deviates from a single power-law, also consistent with independent theoretical predictions. As the data also probe heavy element ions in addition to C IV at the same redshifts, we identify, measure, and search for correlations between column densities of these species where components appear aligned in velocity. Among these ion-ion correlations, we find evidence for tight correlations between C II and Si II, C II and Si III, and C IV and Si IV, suggesting that these pairs of species arise in similar ionization conditions. However, the evidence for correlations decreases as the difference in ionization potential increases. Finally, when controlling for observational bias, we find only marginal evidence for a correlation (86.8% likelihood) between the Doppler line width b(C IV) and column density N(C IV).
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of a 3.6 $\mu$m-selected galaxy sample in the Extended Groth strip. The sample is complete for galaxies with stellar mass $>10^{9.5}$ \Msun and redshift $0.4<z<1.2$. In this redshift range, the IRAC 3.6 $\mu$m band measures the rest-frame near-infrared band, permitting nearly unbiased selection with respect to both quiescent and star-forming galaxies. The numerous spectroscopic redshifts available in the EGS are used to train an Artificial Neural Network to estimate photometric redshifts. The distribution of photometric redshift errors is Gaussian with standard deviation ${\sim}0.025(1+z)$, and the fraction of redshift failures (${>}3\sigma$ errors) is about 3.5%. A new method of validation based on pair statistics confirms the estimate of standard deviation even for galaxies lacking spectroscopic redshifts. Basic galaxy properties measured include rest-frame $U-B$ colors, $B$- and $K$-band absolute magnitudes, and stellar masses. We divide the sample into quiescent and star-forming galaxies according to their rest-frame $U-B$ colors and 24 to 3.6 \micron\ flux density ratios and derive rest $K$-band luminosity functions and stellar mass functions for quiescent, star forming, and all galaxies. The results show that massive, quiescent galaxies were in place by $z\approx1$, but lower mass galaxies generally ceased their star formation at later epochs.
  • The shutdown of star formation in galaxies is generally termed `quenching'. Although quenching may occur through a variety of processes, the exact mechanism(s) that is in fact responsible for quenching is still in question. This paper addresses quenching by searching for traces of possible quenching processes through their effects on galaxy structural parameters such as surface stellar mass density and Sersic index (n). We analyze the rest-frame U-B color correlations versus these structural parameters using a sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.5< z<0.8 from the DEEP2/AEGIS survey. We find that Sersic index (n) has the smallest overlap region among all tested parameters and resembles a step-function with a threshold value of n=2.3. There exists, however, a significant population of outliers with blue colors yet high n values that seem to contradict this behavior. We hypothesize that their Sersic values may be distorted by bursts of star formation, AGNs, and/or poor fits, leading us to consider central surface stellar mass density as an alternative to Sersic index. Not only does it correct the outliers, it also forms a tight relationship with color, suggesting that the innermost structure of galaxies is most physically linked with quenching. Furthermore, at z~0.65, the majority of the blue cloud galaxies cannot simply fade onto the red sequence since their GIM2D bulge masses are only half as large on average as the bulge masses of similar red sequence galaxies, thus demonstrating that stellar mass must absolutely increase at the centers of galaxies as they quench. We discuss a two-stage model for quenching in which galaxy star formation rates are controlled by their dark halos while they are still in the blue cloud and a second quenching process sets in later, associated with the central stellar mass build-up.
  • We present evidence from a sample of 544 galaxies from the DEEP2 Survey for evolution of the internal kinematics of blue galaxies with stellar masses ranging 8.0 < log M* (M_Sun) < 10.7 over 0.2<z<1.2. DEEP2 provides galaxy spectra and Hubble imaging from which we measure emission-line kinematics and galaxy inclinations, respectively. Our large sample allows us to overcome scatter intrinsic to galaxy properties in order to examine trends in kinematics. We find that at a fixed stellar mass galaxies systematically decrease in disordered motions and increase in rotation velocity and potential well depth with time. Massive galaxies are the most well-ordered at all times examined, with higher rotation velocities and less disordered motions than less massive galaxies. We quantify disordered motions with an integrated gas velocity dispersion corrected for beam smearing (sigma_g). It is unlike the typical pressure-supported velocity dispersion measured for early type galaxies and galaxy bulges. Because both seeing and the width of our spectral slits comprise a significant fraction of the galaxy sizes, sigma_g integrates over velocity gradients on large scales which can correspond to non-ordered gas kinematics. We compile measurements of galaxy kinematics from the literature over 1.2<z<3.8 and do not find any trends with redshift, likely for the most part because these datasets are biased toward the most highly star-forming systems. In summary, over the last ~8 billion years since z=1.2, blue galaxies evolve from disordered to ordered systems as they settle to become the rotation-dominated disk galaxies observed in the Universe today, with the most massive galaxies being the most evolved at any time.
  • We present the Arizona CDFS Environment Survey (ACES), a recently-completed spectroscopic redshift survey of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) conducted using IMACS on the Magellan-Baade telescope. In total, the survey targeted 7277 unique sources down to a limiting magnitude of R = 24.1, yielding 5080 secure redshifts across the ~30' x 30' extended CDFS region. The ACES dataset delivers a significant increase to both the spatial coverage and the sampling density of the spectroscopic observations in the field. Combined with previously-published, spectroscopic redshifts, ACES now creates a highly-complete survey of the galaxy population at R < 23, enabling the local galaxy density (or environment) on relatively small scales (~1 Mpc) to be measured at z < 1 in one of the most heavily-studied and data-rich fields in the sky. Here, we describe the motivation, design, and implementation of the survey and present a preliminary redshift and environment catalog. In addition, we utilize the ACES spectroscopic redshift catalog to assess the quality of photometric redshifts from both the COMBO-17 and MUSYC imaging surveys of the CDFS.
  • Context: Very few z > 1.5 clusters of galaxies are known. It is important to study the properties of galaxies in these clusters and the ICM and, further, to cross-check the reliability of the various mass estimates. This will help to clarify the process of structure formation and how distant clusters may be used to constrain cosmology. AIMS: We present a 84 ks Chandra observation of IRC-0218A, a cluster of galaxies inferred by the presence of a galaxy overdensity in the infrared at a redshift of 1.62 and associated with some XMM emission Methods: Spatial analysis of the Chandra X-ray photon distribution. Results: The Chandra observation of IRC-0218A appears to be entirely dominated by a point-source located at the centroid of the MIR galaxy density. In addition, we detect weak extended emission (2.3 sigma) out to a radius of 25" with a flux of ~ 3 10E-15 erg/s/cm2 in the [0.3-2]keV band. Assuming that clusters evolve similarly, we infer a virial mass of M200 =7.7+/-3.8 10E13Mo. This is marginally compatible with our current estimate of the cluster dynamical mass (based on 10 redshifts), although there is no evidence that the galaxy peculiar velocities correspond to the motions of a virialized structure. The stellar mass enclosed in the inferred X-ray virial radius is estimated to 1-2 10E12 Mo. We provide a detailed account of 28 X-ray point-sources detected in the field.
  • The `Eagle' galaxy at a redshift of 0.77 is studied with the Oxford Short Wavelength Integral Field Spectrograph (SWIFT) and multi-wavelength data from the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS). It was chosen from AEGIS because of the bright and extended emission in its slit spectrum. Three dimensional kinematic maps of the Eagle reveal a gradient in velocity dispersion which spans 35-75 +/- 10 km/s and a rotation velocity of 25 +/- 5 km/s uncorrected for inclination. Hubble Space Telescope images suggest it is close to face-on. In comparison with galaxies from AEGIS at similar redshifts, the Eagle is extremely bright and blue in the rest-frame optical, highly star-forming, dominated by unobscured star-formation, and has a low metallicity for its size. This is consistent with its selection. The Eagle is likely undergoing a major merger and is caught in the early stage of a star-burst when it has not yet experienced metal enrichment or formed the mass of dust typically found in star-forming galaxies.
  • We describe the effect of AGN light on host galaxy optical and UV-optical colours, as determined from X-ray-selected AGN host galaxies at z~1, and compare the AGN host galaxy colours to those of a control sample matched to the AGN sample in both redshift and stellar mass. We identify as X-ray-selected AGNs 8.7 +4/-3 per cent of the red-sequence control galaxies, 9.8 +/-3 per cent of the blue-cloud control galaxies, and 14.7 +4/-3 per cent of the green-valley control galaxies. The nuclear colours of AGN hosts are generally bluer than their outer colours, while the control galaxies exhibit redder nuclei. AGNs in blue-cloud host galaxies experience less X-ray obscuration, while AGNs in red-sequence hosts have more, which is the reverse of what is expected from general considerations of the interstellar medium. Outer and integrated colours of AGN hosts generally agree with the control galaxies, regardless of X-ray obscuration, but the nuclear colours of unobscured AGNs are typically much bluer, especially for X-ray luminous objects. Visible point sources are seen in many of these, indicating that the nuclear colours have been contaminated by AGN light and that obscuration of the X-ray radiation and visible light are therefore highly correlated. Red AGN hosts are typically slightly bluer than red-sequence control galaxies, which suggests that their stellar populations are slightly younger. We compare these colour data to current models of AGN formation. The unexpected trend of less X-ray obscuration in blue-cloud galaxies and more in red-sequence galaxies is problematic for all AGN feedback models, in which gas and dust is thought to be removed as star formation shuts down. [See paper for full abstract.]
  • We present new observational determinations of the evolution of the 2-10keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of AGN. We utilise data from a number of surveys including both the 2Ms Chandra Deep Fields and the AEGIS-X 200ks survey, enabling accurate measurements of the evolution of the faint end of the XLF. We combine direct, hard X-ray selection and spectroscopic follow-up or photometric redshift estimates at z<1.2 with a rest-frame UV colour pre-selection approach at higher redshifts to avoid biases associated with catastrophic failure of the photometric redshifts. Only robust optical counterparts to X-ray sources are considered using a likelihood ratio matching technique. A Bayesian methodology is developed that considers redshift probability distributions, incorporates selection functions for our high redshift samples, and allows robust comparison of different evolutionary models. We find that the XLF retains the same shape at all redshifts, but undergoes strong luminosity evolution out to z~1, and an overall negative density evolution with increasing redshift, which thus dominates the evolution at earlier times. We do not find evidence that a Luminosity-Dependent Density Evolution, and the associated flattening of the faint-end slope, is required to describe the evolution of the XLF. We find significantly higher space densities of low-luminosity, high-redshift AGN than in prior studies, and a smaller shift in the peak of the number density to lower redshifts with decreasing luminosity. The total luminosity density of AGN peaks at z=1.2+/-0.1, but there is a mild decline to higher redshifts. We find >50% of black hole growth takes place at z>1, with around half in Lx<10^44 erg/s AGN.
  • We combine new Spitzer Space Telescope observations in the mid- and far-infrared with SCUBA 850 micron observations to improve the measurement of dust temperatures, masses and luminosities for 11 galaxies of the SCUBA Local Universe Galaxy Survey (SLUGS). By fitting dust models we measure typical dust masses of 10E7.9 M_sol and dust luminosities of ~ 10E10 L_sol, for galaxies with modest star formation rates. The data presented in this paper combined with previous observations show that cold dust is present in all types of spiral galaxies and is a major contributor to their total luminosity. Because of the lower dust temperature of the SCUBA sources measured in this paper, they have flatter Far-IR nu F_nu(160um)/nu F_nu(850um) slopes than the larger Spitzer Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), the sample that provides the best measurements of the dust properties of galaxies in the nearby universe. The new data presented here added to SINGS extend the parameter space that is well covered by local galaxies, providing a comprehensive set of templates that can be used to interpret the observations of nearby and distant galaxies.
  • We present the AEGIS-X survey, a series of deep Chandra ACIS-I observations of the Extended Groth Strip. The survey comprises pointings at 8 separate positions, each with nominal exposure 200ks, covering a total area of approximately 0.67 deg2 in a strip of length 2 degrees. We describe in detail an updated version of our data reduction and point source detection algorithms used to analyze these data. A total of 1325 band-merged sources have been found to a Poisson probability limit of 4e-6, with limiting fluxes of 5.3e-17 erg/cm2/s in the soft (0.5-2 keV) band and 3.8e-16 erg/cm2/s in the hard (2-10 keV) band. We present simulations verifying the validity of our source detection procedure and showing a very small, <1.5%, contamination rate from spurious sources. Optical/NIR counterparts have been identified from the DEEP2, CFHTLS, and Spitzer/IRAC surveys of the same region. Using a likelihood ratio method, we find optical counterparts for 76% of our sources, complete to R(AB)=24.1, and, of the 66% of the sources that have IRAC coverage, 94% have a counterpart to a limit of 0.9 microJy at 3.6 microns (m(AB)=23.8). After accounting for (small) positional offsets in the 8 Chandra fields, the astrometric accuracy of the Chandra positions is found to be 0.8 arcsec RMS, however this number depends both on the off-axis angle and the number of detected counts for a given source. All the data products described in this paper are made available via a public website.
  • We present infrared observations of 66 starburst galaxies over a wide range of oxygen abundances, to measure how metallicity affects their dust properties. The data include imaging and spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope, supplemented by groundbased near-infrared imaging. We confirm a strong correlation of aromatic emission with metallicity, with a threshold at a metallicity [12+log(O/H)]~8. The large scatter in both the metallicity and radiation hardness dependence of this behavior implies that it is not due to a single effect, but to some combination. We show that the far-infrared color temperature of the large dust grains increases towards lower metallicity, peaking at a metallicity of 8 before turning over. We compute dust masses and compare them to HI masses from the literature to derive the gas to dust ratio, which increases by nearly 3 orders of magnitude between solar metallicity and a metallicity of 8, below which it flattens out. The abrupt change in aromatic emission at mid-infrared wavelengths thus appears to be reflected in the far-infrared properties, indicating that metallicity changes affect the composition of the full range of dust grain sizes that dominate the infrared emission. In addition, we find that the ratio L(8 micron)/L(TIR), important for calibrating 24 micron measurements of high redshift galaxies, increases slightly as the metallicity decreases from ~solar to ~50% of solar, and then decreases by an order of magnitude with further decreases in metallicity. Although the great majority of galaxies show similar patterns of behavior as described above, there are three exceptions, SBS 0335-052E, Haro 11, and SHOC 391. Their infrared SEDs are dominated energetically by the mid-IR near 24 micron rather than by the 60 - 200 micron region. (Abridged)
  • We present Spitzer/IRS mid-infrared spectra for 15 gravitationally lensed, 24 micron--selected galaxies, and combine the results with 4 additional very faint galaxies with IRS spectra in the literature. The median intrinsic 24 micron flux density of the sample is 130 microJy, enabling a systematic survey of the spectral properties of the very faint 24 micron sources that dominate the number counts of Spitzer cosmological surveys. Six of the 19 galaxy spectra (32%) show the strong mid-IR continuua expected of AGN; X-ray detections confirm the presence of AGN in three of these cases, and reveal AGNs in two other galaxies. These results suggest that nuclear accretion may contribute more flux to faint 24 micron--selected samples than previously assumed. Almost all the spectra show some aromatic (PAH) emission features; the measured aromatic flux ratios do not show evolution from z=0. In particular, the high S/N mid-IR spectrum of SMM J163554.2+661225 agrees remarkably well with low--redshift, lower--luminosity templates. We compare the rest-frame 8 micron and total infrared luminosities of star--forming galaxies, and find that the behavior of this ratio with total IR luminosity has evolved modestly from z=2 to z=0. Since the high aromatic--to--continuum flux ratios in these galaxies rule out a dominant contribution by AGN, this finding implies systematic evolution in the structure and/or metallicity of infrared sources with redshift. It also has implications for the estimates of star forming rates inferred from 24 micron measurements, in the sense that at z ~2, a given observed frame 24 micron luminosity corresponds to a lower bolometric luminosity than would be inferred from low-redshift templates of similar luminosity at the corresponding rest wavelength.
  • We present the quantitative rest-frame B morphological evolution and galaxy merger fractions at 0.2 < z < 1.2 as observed by the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). We use the Gini coefficent and M_20 to identify major mergers and classify galaxy morphology for a volume-limited sample of 3009 galaxies brighter than 0.4 L_B^*, assuming pure luminosity evolution of 1.3 M_B per unit redshift. We find that the merger fraction remains roughly constant at 10 +/- 2% for 0.2 < z < 1.2. The fraction of E/S0/Sa increases from 21+/- 3% at z ~ 1.1 to 44 +/- 9% at z ~ 0.3, while the fraction of Sb-Ir decreases from 64 +/- 6% at z ~ 1.1 to 47 +/- 9% at z ~ 0.3. The majority of z < 1.2 Spitzer MIPS 24 micron sources with L(IR) > 10^11 L_sun are disk galaxies, and only ~ 15% are classified as major merger candidates. Edge-on and dusty disk galaxies (Sb-Ir) are almost a third of the red sequence at z ~ 1.1, while E/S0/Sa makeup over 90% of the red sequence at z ~ 0.3. Approximately 2% of our full sample are red mergers. We conclude (1) the galaxy merger rate does not evolve strongly between 0.2 < z < 1.2; (2) the decrease in the volume-averaged star-formation rate density since z ~ 1 is a result of declining star-formation in disk galaxies rather than a disappearing population of major mergers; (3) the build-up of the red sequence at z < 1 can be explained by a doubling in the number of spheroidal galaxies since z ~ 1.2.
  • We examine the infrared properties of five low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) and compare them with related but higher surface brightness galaxies, using Spitzer Space Telescope images and spectra. All the LSBGs are detected in the 3.6 and 4.5um bands, representing the stellar population. All but one are detected at 5.8 and 8.0um, revealing emission from hot dust and aromatic molecules, though many are faint or point-like at these wavelengths. Detections of LSBGs at the far-infrared wavelengths, 24, 70, and 160um, are varied in morphology and brightness, with only two detections at 160um, resulting in highly varied spectral energy distributions. Consistent with previous expectations for these galaxies, we find that detectable dust components exist for only some LSBGs, with the strength of dust emission dependent on the existence of bright star forming regions. However, the far-infrared emission may be relatively weak compared with normal star-forming galaxies.
  • We study 87 Extremely Red Objects (EROs), selected both to have color redder than R-[3.6] = 4.0, and to have confirmed spectroscopic redshifts. Together, these two constraints result in this sample populating a fairly narrow redshift range at 0.76 < z < 1.42. The key new ingredient included here is deep Spitzer Space Telescope InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) data. Based on [3.6]-[8.0] color, we demonstrate that it is possible to classify EROs into early-type, dusty starburst, or power-law (AGN) types. We present ultraviolet to mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images, both of which support our simple IRAC color classification.
  • We visually and quantitatively determine the host galaxy morphologies of 94 intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 1.2) active galactic nuclei (AGN), selected using Chandra X-ray and Spitzer mid-infrared data in the Extended Groth Strip. Using recently developed morphology measures, the second-order moment of the brightest 20% of a galaxy's flux (M_{20}) and the Gini coefficient, we find that X-ray-selected AGN mostly reside in E/S0/Sa galaxies (53^{+11}_{-10}%), while IR-selected AGN show no clear preference for host morphology. X-ray-selected AGN hosts are members of close pairs more often than the field population by a factor of 3.3+/-1.4, but most of these pair members appear to be undisturbed early-type galaxies and do not tend to show direct evidence of gravitational perturbations or interactions. Thus, the activation mechanism for AGN activity remains unknown, even for pair members.
  • In this the first of a series of Letters, we present a description of the panchromatic data sets that have been acquired in the Extended Groth Strip region of the sky. Our survey, the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS), is intended to study the physical properties and evolutionary processes of galaxies at z ~ 1. It includes the following deep, wide-field imaging data sets: Chandra/ACIS X-ray (0.5 - 10 keV), GALEX ultraviolet (1200 - 2500 Angstrom), CFHT/MegaCam Legacy Survey optical (3600 - 9000 Angstroms), CFHT/CFH12K optical (4500 - 9000 Angstroms), Hubble Space Telescope/ACS optical (4400 - 8500 Angstroms), Palomar/WIRC near-infrared (1.2 - 2.2 microns), Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared (3.6 - 8.0 microns), Spitzer/MIPS far-infrared (24 - 70 microns), and VLA radio continuum (6 - 20 cm). In addition, this region of the sky has been targeted for extensive spectroscopy using the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Our survey is compared to other large multiwavelength surveys in terms of depth and sky coverage.
  • The evolution of the B-band galaxy luminosity function is measured using a sample of more than 11,000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey. The rest-frame M_B versus U-B color-magnitude diagram of DEEP2 galaxies shows that the color-magnitude bi-modality seen in galaxies locally is still present at redshifts z > 1. Dividing the sample at the trough of this color bimodality into predominantly red and blue galaxies, we find that the luminosity function of each galaxy color type evolves differently. Blue counts tend to shift to brighter magnitudes at constant number density, while the red counts remain largely constant at a fixed absolute magnitude. Using Schechter functions with fixed faint-end slopes we find that M*_B for blue galaxies brightens by ~ 1.3 magnitudes per unit redshift, with no significant evolution in number density. For red galaxies M*_B brightens somewhat less with redshift, while the formal value of phi* declines. When the population of blue galaxies is subdivided into two halves using the rest-frame color as the criterion, the measured evolution of both blue subpopulations is very similar.
  • The DEEP2 and COMBO-17 surveys are used to study the evolution of the luminosity function of red and blue galaxies to $z \sim 1$. Schechter function fits show that, since $z = 1$, $M^*_B$ dims by $\sim$ 1.3 mag per unit redshift for both color classes, $\phi^*$ of blue galaxies shows little change, while $\phi^*$ for red galaxies has formally nearly quadrupled. At face value, the number density of blue galaxies has remained roughly constant since $ z = 1$, whereas that of red galaxies has been rising. Luminosity densities support both conclusions, but we note that most red-galaxy evolution occurs between our data and local surveys and in our highest redshift bin, where the data are weakest. We discuss the implications of having most red galaxies emerge after $z = 1$ from precursors among the blue population, taking into account the properties of local and distant E/S0s. We suggest a ``mixed'' scenario in which some blue galaxies have their star-formation quenched in gas-rich mergers, migrate to the red sequence with a variety of masses, and merge further on the red sequence in one or more purely stellar mergers. E/S0s of a given mass today will have formed via different routes, in a manner that may help to explain the fundamental plane and other local scaling laws.
  • We present R-band CCD photometry for 1332 early-type galaxies, observed as part of the ENEAR survey of peculiar motions using early-type galaxies in the nearby Universe. Circular apertures are used to trace the surface brightness profiles, which are then fit by a two-component bulge-disk model. From the fits we obtain the structural parameters required to estimate galaxy distances using the D_n-sigma and Fundamental Plane relations. We find that about 12% of the galaxies are well represented by a pure r^{1/4} law while 87% are best fit by a two component model. There are 356 repeated observations of 257 galaxies obtained during different runs that are used to derive statistical corrections and bring the data to a common system. We also use these repeated observations to estimate our internal errors. The accuracy of our measurements are tested by the comparison of 354 galaxies in common with other authors. Typical errors in our measurements are 0.011 dex for log{D_n}, 0.064 dex for log{r_e}, 0.086 mag arcsec^{-2} for <{mu_e}> and 0.09 for m_{R_C}, comparable to those estimated by other authors. The photometric data reported here represent one of the largest high-quality and uniform all-sky samples currently available for early-type galaxies in the nearby universe, especially suitable for peculiar motion studies.
  • We use a sample of 7 starburst galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z ~ 0.4 and z ~ 0.8) with observations ranging from the observed ultraviolet to 1.4 GHz, to compare the star formation rate (SFR) estimators which are used in the different wavelength regimes. We find that extinction corrected Halpha underestimates the SFR, and the degree of this underestimation increases with the infrared luminosity of the galaxies. Galaxies with very different levels of dust extinction as measured with SFR(IR)/SFR(Halpha, uncorrected for extinction) present a similar attenuation A[Halpha], as if the Balmer lines probed a different region of the galaxy than the one responsible for the bulk of the IR luminosity for large SFRs. In addition, SFR estimates derived from [OII]3727 match very well those inferred from Halpha after applying the metallicity correction derived from local galaxies. SFRs estimated from the UV luminosities show a dichotomic behavior, similar to that previously reported by other authors in galaxies at z <~ 0.4. Here we extend this result up to z ~ 0.8. Finally, one of the studied objects is a luminous compact galaxy (LCG) that may be suffering similar dust-enshrouded star formation episodes. These results highlight the relevance of quantifying the actual L(IR) of LCGs, as well as that of a much larger and generic sample of luminous infrared galaxies, which will be possible after the launch of SIRTF.
  • This paper presents data on the ENEARc subsample of the larger ENEAR survey of the nearby early-type galaxies. The ENEARc galaxies belong to clusters and were specifically chosen to be used for the construction of a D_n-sigma template. The ENEARc sample includes new measurements of spectroscopic and photometric parameters (redshift, velocity dispersion, line index Mg_2, and the angular diameter d_n) as well as data from the literature. New spectroscopic data are given for 229 cluster early-type galaxies and new photometry is presented for 348 objects. Repeat and overlap observations with external data sets are used to construct a final merged catalog consisting of 640 early-type galaxies in 28 clusters. Objective criteria, based on catalogs of groups of galaxies derived from complete redshift surveys of the nearby universe, are used to assign galaxies to clusters. In a companion paper these data are used to construct the template D_n-sigma distance relation for early-type galaxies which has been used to estimate galaxy distances and derive peculiar velocities for the ENEAR all-sky sample.