• Planets that are embedded in the changing magnetic fields of their host stars can experience significant induction heating in their interiors caused by the planet's orbital motion. For induction heating to be substantial, the planetary orbit has to be inclined with respect to the stellar rotation and dipole axes. Using WX~UMa, for which the rotation and magnetic axes are aligned, as an example, we show that for close-in planets on inclined orbits, induction heating can be stronger than the tidal heating occurring inside Jupiter's satellite Io; namely, it can generate a surface heat flux exceeding 2\,W\,m$^{-2}$. An internal heating source of such magnitude can lead to extreme volcanic activity on the planet's surface, possibly also to internal local magma oceans, and to the formation of a plasma torus around the star aligned with the planetary orbit. A strongly volcanically active planet would eject into space mostly SO$_2$, which would then dissociate into oxygen and sulphur atoms. Young planets would also eject CO$_2$. Oxygen would therefore be the major component of the torus. If the O{\sc i} column density of the torus exceeds $\approx$10$^{12}$\,cm$^{-2}$, the torus could be revealed by detecting absorption signatures at the position of the strong far-ultraviolet O{\sc i} triplet at about 1304\,\AA. We estimate that this condition is satisfied if the O{\sc i} atoms in the torus escape the system at a velocity smaller than 1--10\,km\,s$^{-1}$. These estimates are valid also for a tidally heated planet.
  • The K2-33 planetary system hosts one transiting ~5 R_E planet orbiting the young M-type host star. The planet's mass is still unknown, with an estimated upper limit of 5.4 M_J. The extreme youth of the system (<20 Myr) gives the unprecedented opportunity to study the earliest phases of planetary evolution, at a stage when the planet is exposed to an extremely high level of high-energy radiation emitted by the host star. We perform a series of 1D hydrodynamic simulations of the planet's upper atmosphere considering a range of possible planetary masses, from 2 to 40 M_E, and equilibrium temperatures, from 850 to 1300 K, to account for internal heating as a result of contraction. We obtain temperature profiles mostly controlled by the planet's mass, while the equilibrium temperature has a secondary effect. For planetary masses below 7-10 M_E, the atmosphere is subject to extremely high escape rates, driven by the planet's weak gravity and high thermal energy, which increase with decreasing mass and/or increasing temperature. For higher masses, the escape is instead driven by the absorption of the high-energy stellar radiation. A rough comparison of the timescales for complete atmospheric escape and age of the system indicates that the planet is more massive than 10 M_E.
  • We investigate the interaction between the magnetized stellar wind plasma and the partially ionized hydrodynamic hydrogen outflow from the escaping upper atmosphere of non- or weakly magnetized hot Jupiters. We use the well-studied hot Jupiter HD 209458b as an example for similar exoplanets, assuming a negligible intrinsic magnetic moment. For this planet, the stellar wind plasma interaction forms an obstacle in the planet's upper atmosphere, in which the position of the magnetopause is determined by the condition of pressure balance between the stellar wind and the expanded atmosphere, heated by the stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. We show that the neutral atmospheric atoms penetrate into the region dominated by the stellar wind, where they are ionized by photo-ionization and charge exchange, and then mixed with the stellar wind flow. Using a 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, we show that an induced magnetic field forms in front of the planetary obstacle, which appears to be much stronger compared to those produced by the solar wind interaction with Venus and Mars. Depending on the stellar wind parameters, because of the induced magnetic field, the planetary obstacle can move up to ~0.5-1 planetary radii closer to the planet. Finally, we discuss how estimations of the intrinsic magnetic moment of hot Jupiters can be inferred by coupling hydrodynamic upper planetary atmosphere and MHD stellar wind interaction models together with UV observations. In particular, we find that HD 209458b should likely have an intrinsic magnetic moment of 10-20% that of Jupiter.
  • Planetary embryos form protoplanets via mutual collisions, which can lead to the development of magma oceans. During their solidification, large amounts of the mantles' volatile contents may be outgassed. The resulting H$_2$O/CO$_2$ dominated steam atmospheres may be lost efficiently via hydrodynamic escape due to the low gravity and the high stellar EUV luminosities. Protoplanets forming later from such degassed building blocks could therefore be drier than previously expected. We model the outgassing and subsequent hydrodynamic escape of steam atmospheres from such embryos. The efficient outflow of H drags along heavier species (O, CO$_2$, noble gases). The full range of possible EUV evolution tracks of a solar-mass star is taken into account to investigate the escape from Mars-sized embryos at different orbital distances. The envelopes are typically lost within a few to a few tens of Myr. Furthermore, we study the influence on protoplanetary evolution, exemplified by Venus. We investigate different early evolution scenarios and constrain realistic cases by comparing modeled noble gas isotope ratios with observations. Starting from solar values, consistent isotope ratios (Ne, Ar) can be found for different solar EUV histories, as well as assumptions about the initial atmosphere (either pure steam or a mixture with accreted H). Our results generally favor an early accretion scenario with a small amount of accreted H and a low-activity Sun, because in other cases too much CO$_2$ is lost during evolution, which is inconsistent with Venus' present atmosphere. Important issues are likely the time at which the initial steam atmosphere is outgassed and/or the amount of CO$_2$ which may still be delivered at later evolutionary stages. A late accretion scenario can only reproduce present isotope ratios for a highly active young Sun, but then very massive steam atmospheres would be required.
  • The interaction of escaping upper atmosphere of a hydrogen rich non-magnetized analog of HD209458b with a stellar wind of its host G-type star at different orbital distances is simulated with a 2D axisymmetric multi-fluid hydrodynamic model. A realistic sun-like spectrum of XUV radiation which ionizes and heats the planetary atmosphere, hydrogen photo-chemistry, as well as stellar-planetary tidal interaction are taken into account to generate self-consistently an atmospheric hydrodynamic outflow. Two different regimes of the planetary and stellar winds interaction have been modelled. These are: 1) the "captured by the star" regime, when the tidal force and pressure gradient drive the planetary material beyond the Roche lobe towards the star, and 2) the "blown by the wind" regime, when sufficiently strong stellar wind confines the escaping planetary atmosphere and channels it into the tail. The model simulates in details the hydrodynamic interaction between the planetary atoms, protons and the stellar wind, as well as the production of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) around the planet due to charge-exchange between planetary atoms and stellar protons. The revealed location and shape of the ENA cloud either as a paraboloid shell between ionopause and bowshock (for the "blown by the wind" regime), or a turbulent layer at the contact boundary between the planetary stream and stellar wind (for the "captured by the star" regime) are of importance for the interpretation of Ly{\alpha} absorption features in exoplanetary transit spectra and characterization of the plasma environments.
  • Aims: We study the acceleration of the stellar winds of rapidly rotating low mass stars and the transition between the slow magnetic rotator and fast magnetic rotator regimes. We aim to understand the properties of stellar winds in the fast magnetic rotator regime and the effects of magneto-centrifugal forces on wind speeds and mass loss rates. Methods: We extend the solar wind model of Johnstone et al. (2015b) to 1D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the winds of rotating stars. We test two assumptions for how to scale the wind temperature to other stars and assume the mass loss rate scales as Mdot ~ Rstar^2 OmegaStar^1.33 Mstar^-3.36, in the unsaturated regime, as estimated by Johnstone et al. (2015a). Results: For 1.0 Msun stars, the winds can be accelerated to several thousand km/s, and the effects of magneto-centrifugal forces are much weaker for lower mass stars. We find that the different assumptions for how to scale the wind temperature to other stars lead to significantly different mass loss rates for the rapid rotators. If we assume a constant temperature, the mass loss rates of solar mass stars do not saturate at rapid rotation, which we show to be inconsistent with observed rotational evolution. If we assume the wind temperatures scale positively with rotation, the mass loss rates are only influenced significantly at rotation rates above 75 OmegaSun. We suggest that models with increasing wind speed for more rapid rotators are preferable to those that assume a constant wind speed. If this conclusion is confirmed by more sophisticated wind modelling. it might provide an interesting observational constraint on the properties of stellar winds.
  • For the hot exoplanets CoRoT-24b and CoRoT-24c, observations have provided transit radii R$_{\rm T}$ of 3.7$\pm$0.4 R$_{\oplus}$ and 4.9$\pm$0.5 R$_{\oplus}$, and masses of $\le$5.7 M$_{\oplus}$ and 28$\pm$11 M$_{\oplus}$, respectively. We study their upper atmosphere structure and escape applying an hydrodynamic model. Assuming R$_{\rm T} \approx$ R$_{\rm PL}$, where R$_{\rm PL}$ is the planetary radius at the pressure of 100 mbar, we obtained for CoRoT-24b unrealistically high thermally-driven hydrodynamic escape rates. This is due to the planet's high temperature and low gravity, independent of the stellar EUV flux. Such high escape rates could last only for $<$100 Myr, while R$_{\rm PL}$ shrinks till the escape rate becomes less than or equal to the maximum possible EUV-driven escape rate. For CoRoT-24b, R$_{\rm PL}$ must be therefore located at $\approx 1.9-2.2$ R$_{\oplus}$ and high altitude hazes/clouds possibly extinct the light at R$_{\rm T}$. Our analysis constraints also the planet's mass to be 5$-$5.7 M$_{\oplus}$. For CoRoT-24c, R$_{\rm PL}$ and R$_{\rm T}$ lie too close together to be distinguished in the same way. Similar differences between R$_{\rm PL}$ and R$_{\rm T}$ may be present also for other hot, low-density sub-Neptunes.
  • We investigate the loss rates of the hydrogen atmospheres of terrestrial planets with a range of masses and orbital distances by assuming a stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) luminosity that is 100 times stronger than that of the current Sun. We apply a 1D upper atmosphere radiation absorption and hydrodynamic escape model that takes into account ionization, dissociation and recombination to calculate hydrogen mass loss rates. We study the effects of the ionization, dissociation and recombination on the thermal mass loss rates of hydrogen-dominated super-Earths and compare the results to those obtained by the energy-limited escape formula which is widely used for mass loss evolution studies. Our results indicate that the energy-limited formula can to a great extent over- or underestimate the hydrogen mass loss rates by amounts that depend on the stellar EUV flux and planetary parameters such as mass, size, effective temperature, and EUV absorption radius.
  • Terrestrial planets formed within gaseous protoplanetary disks can accumulate significant hydrogen envelopes. The evolution of such an atmosphere due to XUV driven evaporation depends on the activity evolution of the host star, which itself depends sensitively on its rotational evolution, and therefore on its initial rotation rate. In this letter, we derive an easily applicable method for calculating planetary atmosphere evaporation that combines models for a hydrostatic lower atmosphere and a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere. We show that the initial rotation rate of the central star is of critical importance for the evolution of planetary atmospheres and can determine if a planet keeps or loses its primordial hydrogen envelope. Our results highlight the need for a detailed treatment of stellar activity evolution when studying the evolution of planetary atmospheres.
  • Stellar magnetism, explorable via polarimetry, is a crucial driver of activity, ionization, photodissociation, chemistry and winds in stellar environments. Thus it has an important impact on the atmospheres and magnetospheres of surrounding planets. Modeling of stellar magnetic fields and their winds is extremely challenging, both from the observational and the theoretical points of view, and only recent ground breaking advances in observational instrumentation - as were discussed during this Symposium - and a deeper theoretical understanding of magnetohydrodynamic processes in stars enable us to model stellar magnetic fields and winds and the resulting influence on surrounding planets in more and more detail. We have initiated a national and international research network (NFN): 'Pathways to Habitability - From Disks to Active Stars, Planets to Life', to address questions on the formation and habitability of environments in young, active stellar/planetary systems. In this contribution we discuss the work we are carrying out within this project and focus on how stellar magnetic fields, their winds and the relation to stellar rotation can be assessed observationally with relevant techniques such as Zeeman Doppler Imaging (ZDI), field extrapolation and wind simulations.
  • Aims: We study the evolution of stellar rotation and wind properties for low-mass main-sequence stars. Our aim is to use rotational evolution models to constrain the mass loss rates in stellar winds and to predict how their properties evolve with time on the main-sequence. Methods: We construct a rotational evolution model that is driven by observed rotational distributions of young stellar clusters. Fitting the free parameters in our model allows us to predict how wind mass loss rate depends on stellar mass, radius, and rotation. We couple the results to the wind model developed in Paper I of this series to predict how wind properties evolve on the main-sequence. Results: We estimate that wind mass loss rate scales with stellar parameters as $\dot{M}_\star \propto R_\star^2 \Omega_\star^{1.33} M_\star^{-3.36}$. We estimate that at young ages, the solar wind likely had a mass loss rate that is an order of magnitude higher than that of the current solar wind. This leads to the wind having a higher density at younger ages; however, the magnitude of this change depends strongly on how we scale wind temperature. Due to the spread in rotation rates, young stars show a large range of wind properties at a given age. This spread in wind properties disappears as the stars age. Conclusions: There is a large uncertainty in our knowledge of the evolution of stellar winds on the main-sequence, due both to our lack of knowledge of stellar winds and the large spread in rotation rates at young ages. Given the sensitivity of planetary atmospheres to stellar wind and radiation conditions, these uncertainties can be significant for our understanding of the evolution of planetary environments.
  • Aims: We develop a method for estimating the properties of stellar winds for low-mass main-sequence stars between masses of 0.4 and 1.1 solar masses at a range of distances from the star. Methods: We use 1D thermal pressure driven hydrodynamic wind models run using the Versatile Advection Code. Using in situ measurements of the solar wind, we produce models for the slow and fast components of the solar wind. We consider two radically different methods for scaling the base temperature of the wind to other stars: in Model A, we assume that wind temperatures are fundamentally linked to coronal temperatures, and in Model B, we assume that the sound speed at the base of the wind is a fixed fraction of the escape velocity. In Paper II of this series, we use observationally constrained rotational evolution models to derive wind mass loss rates. Results: Our model for the solar wind provides an excellent description of the real solar wind far from the solar surface, but is unrealistic within the solar corona. We run a grid of 1200 wind models to derive relations for the wind properties as a function of stellar mass, radius, and wind temperature. Using these results, we explore how wind properties depend on stellar mass and rotation. Conclusions: Based on our two assumptions about the scaling of the wind temperature, we argue that there is still significant uncertainty in how these properties should be determined. Resolution of this uncertainty will probably require both the application of solar wind physics to other stars and detailed observational constraints on the properties of stellar winds. In the final section of this paper, we give step by step instructions for how to apply our results to calculate the stellar wind conditions far from the stellar surface.
  • Context. In binary star systems, the winds from the two components impact each other, leading to strong shocks and regions of enhanced density and temperature. Potentially habitable circumbinary planets must continually be exposed to these interactions regions. Aims. We study, for the first time, the interactions between winds from low-mass stars in a binary system, to show the wind conditions seen by potentially habitable circumbinary planets. Methods. We use the advanced 3D numerical hydrodynamic code Nurgush to model the wind interactions of two identical winds from two solar mass stars with circular orbits and a binary separation of 0.5 AU. As input into this model, we use a 1D hydrodynamic simulation of the solar wind, run using the Versatile Advection Code. We derive the locations of stable and habitable orbits in this system to explore what wind conditions potentially habitable planets will be exposed to during their orbits. Results. Our wind interaction simulations result in the formation of two strong shock waves separated by a region of enhanced density and temperature. The wind-wind interaction region has a spiral shape due to Coriolis forces generated by the orbital motions of the two stars. The stable and habitable zone in this system extends from approximately 1.4 AU to 2.4 AU. (TRUNCATED)
  • The magnetic fields of young stars set their coronal properties and control their spin evolution via the star-disc interaction and outflows. Using 14 magnetic maps of 10 classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) we investigate their closed X-ray emitting coronae, their open wind-bearing magnetic fields, and the geometry of magnetospheric accretion flows. The magnetic fields of all the CTTSs are multipolar. Stars with simpler (more dipolar) large-scale magnetic fields have stronger fields, are slower rotators, and have larger X-ray emitting coronae compared to stars with more complex large-scale magnetic fields. The field complexity controls the distribution of open and closed field regions across the stellar surface, and strongly influences the location and shapes of accretion hot spots. However, the higher order field components are of secondary importance in determining the total unsigned open magnetic flux, which depends mainly on the strength of the dipole component and the stellar surface area. Likewise, the dipole component alone provides an adequate approximation of the disc truncation radius. For some stars, the pressure of the hot coronal plasma dominates the stellar magnetic pressure and forces open the closed field inside the disc truncation radius. This is significant as accretion models generally assume that the magnetic field has a closed geometry out to the inner disc edge.
  • Most stellar flares' soft X-ray lightcurves possess a `typical' morphology, which consists of a rapid rise followed by a slow exponential decay. However, a study of 216 of the brightest flares on 161 pre-main sequence stars, observed during the Chandra Orion-Ultradeep Project (COUP), showed that many flare lightcurves depart from this typical morphology. While this can be attributed to the superposition of multiple typical flares, we explore the possibility that the time-variable eclipsing of flares by their host stars may also be an important factor. We assume each flare is contained within a single, uniform plasma density magnetic loop and specify the intrinsic variation of the flare's emission measure with time. We consider rotational eclipse by the star itself, but also by circumstellar discs and flare-associated prominences. Based on this simple model, we generate a set of flares similar to those observed in the COUP database. Many eclipses simply reduce the flare's maximum emission measure or decay time. We conclude therefore that eclipses often pass undetected, but usually have only a modest influence on the flare emission measure profile and hence the derived loop lengths. We show that eclipsing can easily reproduce the observed atypical flare morphologies. The number of atypical modelled flare morphologies is however much less than that found in the COUP sample. The large number of observed atypical flare morphologies, therefore, must be attributed to other processes such as multiple flaring loops.