• We present a pre-survey study of using Pan-STARRS high sampling rate video mode guide star images to search for TNOs. With suitable selection of the guide stars within the Pan-STARRS 7 deg^{2} field of view, the lightcurves of these guide stars can also be used to search for occultations by TNOs. The best target stars for this purpose are stars with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and small angular size.In order to do this, we compiled a catalog using the SNR calculated from stars with m_V <13 mag in the Tycho2 catalog then cross matched these stars with the 2MASS catalog and estimated their angular sizes from (V-K) color. We also outlined a new detection method based on matched filter that is optimized to search for diffraction patterns in the lightcurves due to occultation by sub-kilometer TNOs. A detection threshold is set to compromise between real detections and false positives. Depending on the theoretical size distribution model used, we expect to find up to a hundred events during the three-year life time of the Pan-STARRS-1 project. We have tested the detection algorithm and the pipeline on a set of engineering data (taken at 10Hz in stead of 30Hz). No events were found within the engineering data, which is consistent with the small size of the data set and the theoretical models. Meanwhile, with a total of ~ 22 star-hours video mode data (|\beta| < 10^{\circ}), we are able to set an upper limit of N(>0.5 km) ~ 2.47x10^10 deg^-2 at 95% confidence limit.
  • Observational astronomy has changed drastically in the last decade: manually driven target-by-target instruments have been replaced by fully automated robotic telescopes. Data acquisition methods have advanced to the point that terabytes of data are flowing in and being stored on a daily basis. At the same time, the vast majority of analysis tools in stellar astrophysics still rely on manual expert interaction. To bridge this gap, we foresee that the next decade will witness a fundamental shift in the approaches to data analysis: case-by-case methods will be replaced by fully automated pipelines that will process the data from their reduction stage, through analysis, to storage. While major effort has been invested in data reduction automation, automated data analysis has mostly been neglected despite the urgent need. Scientific data mining will face serious challenges to identify, understand and eliminate the sources of systematic errors that will arise from this automation. As a special case, we present an artificial intelligence (AI) driven pipeline that is prototyped in the domain of stellar astrophysics (eclipsing binaries in particular), current results and the challenges still ahead.