• We present a simple set of kinematic criteria that can distinguish between galaxies dominated by ordered rotational motion and those involved in major merger events. Our criteria are based on the dynamics of the warm ionized gas (as traced by H-alpha) within galaxies, making this analysis accessible to high-redshift systems, whose kinematics are primarily traceable through emission features. Using the method of kinemetry (developed by Krajnovic and co-workers), we quantify asymmetries in both the velocity and velocity dispersion maps of the warm gas, and the resulting criteria enable us to empirically differentiate between non-merging and merging systems at high redshift. We apply these criteria to 11 of our best-studied rest-frame UV/optical-selected z~2 galaxies for which we have near infrared integral field spectroscopic data from SINFONI on the VLT. Of these 11 systems, we find that >50% have kinematics consistent with a single rotating disk interpretation, while the remaining systems are more likely undergoing major mergers. This result, combined with the short formation timescales of these systems, provides evidence that rapid, smooth accretion of gas plays a significant role in galaxy formation at high redshift.
  • We describe results of optical and near-IR observations of a large spectroscopic sample of star-forming galaxies photometrically-selected to lie in the redshift range 1.4 < z < 2.5, often called the ``redshift desert'' because of historical difficulty in obtaining spectroscopic redshifts in this range. We show that the former ``redshift desert'' is now very much open to observation.
  • We have used 850$\mu$m maps obtained as part of the Canada-UK Deep Submillimeter Survey (CUDSS) to investigate the sub-mm properties of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). We used three samples of Lyman-break galaxies: two from the Canada-France Deep Fields (CFDF) survey covering CUDSS-14 and CUDSS-3, and one from Steidel and collaborators also covering CUDSS-14. We measure a mean flux from both CFDF LBG samples at a level of $\sim2\sigma$ of 0.414 $\pm$ 0.263 mJy for CUDSS-03 and 0.382 $\pm$ 0.206 mJy for CUDSS-14, but the Steidel et al. sample is consistent with zero flux. From this we place upper limits on the Lyman-break contribution to the $850{\mu}m$ background of $\sim$20%. We have also measured the cross-clustering between the LBGs and SCUBA sources. From this measurement we infer a large clustering amplitude of $r_o$ = 11.5 $\pm$ 3.0 $\pm$ 3.0 $h^{-1}$Mpc for the Steidel et al. sample (where the first error is statistical and the second systematic), $r_o$ = 4.5 $\pm$ 7.0 $\pm$ 5.0 $h^{-1}$Mpc for CFDF-14 and $r_o$ = 7.5 $\pm$ 7.0 $\pm$ 5.0 $h^{-1}$Mpc for CFDF-3. The Steidel et al sample, for which we have most only significant detection of clustering is also the largest of the three samples and has spectroscopically confirmed redshifts.
  • We present new Hubble Space Telescope, high-resolution optical imaging of the submm luminous Lyman-break galaxy, Westphal-MMD11, an interacting starburst at z=2.979. The new imaging data, in conjunction with re-analysis of Keck optical and near-IR spectra, demonstrate MMD11 to be an interacting system of at least three components: a luminous blue source, a fainter blue source, and an extremely red object (ERO) with R-K>6. The separations between components are \~8 kpc (Lambda=0.7, Omega_M=0.3, h=0.65), similar to some of the local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs). The lack of obvious AGN in MMD11, along with the fragmented, early stage merger morphology, suggest a young forming environment. While we cannot unambiguously identify the location of the far-IR emission within the system, analogy to similar ULIGs suggests the ERO as the likely far-IR source. The >10^{12} L_sun bolometric luminosity of MMD11 can be predicted reasonably from its rest frame UV properties once all components are taken into account, however this is not typically the case for local galaxies of similar luminosities. While LBGs as red in g-R and R-K as MMD11 are rare, they can only be found over the restricted 2.7 < z < 3.0 range. Therefore a substantial number of MMD11-like galaxies (~<0.62 arcmin^{-2}) may exist when integrated over the likely redshift range of SCUBA sources (z=1 -5), suggesting that SCUBA sources should not necessarily be seen as completely orthogonal to optically selected galaxies.
  • We discuss a sample of 29 AGN (16 narrow-lined and 13 broad-lined) discovered in a spectroscopic survey of ~1000 star-forming Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at z~3. Reaching apparent magnitudes of R_{AB}=25.5, the sample includes broad-lined AGN approximately 100 times less UV-luminous than most surveys to date covering similar redshifts, and the first statistical sample of UV/optically-selected narrow-lined AGN at high redshift. The fraction of objects in our survey with clear evidence for AGN activity is ~3%. A substantial fraction, perhaps even most, of these objects would not have been detected in even the deepest existing X-ray surveys. We argue that these AGN are plausibly hosted by the equivalent of LBGs. The UV luminosities of the broad-lined AGN in the sample are compatible with Eddington-limited accretion onto black holes that satisfy the locally determined M_{BH} versus M_{bulge} relation given estimates of the stellar masses of LBGs. The clustering properties of the AGN are compatible with their being hosted by objects similar to LBGs. The implied lifetime of the active AGN phase in LBGs, if it occurs some time during the active star-formation phase, is ~10^7 years.
  • Galaxies at very high redshift (z~3 or greater) are now accessible to wholesale observation, making possible for the first time a robust statistical assessment of their spatial distribution at lookback times approaching ~90% of the age of the Universe. This paper summarizes recent progress in understanding the nature of these early galaxies, concentrating in particular on the clustering properties of photometrically selected ``Lyman break'' galaxies. Direct comparison of the data to predictions and physical insights provided by galaxy and structure formation models is particularly straightforward at these early epochs, and results in critical tests of the ``biased'', hierarchical galaxy formation paradigm.
  • We have measured the counts-in-cells fluctuations of 268 Lyman-break galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in six 9 arcmin by 9 arcmin fields at z~3. The variance of galaxy counts in cubes of comoving side length 7.7, 11.9, 11.4 h^{-1} Mpc is \sigma_{gal}^2 ~ 1.3\pm0.4 for \Omega_M=1, 0.2 open, 0.3 flat, implying a bias on these scales of \sigma_{gal} / \sigma_{mass} = 6.0\pm1.1, 1.9\pm0.4, 4.0\pm0.7. The bias and abundance of Lyman-break galaxies are surprisingly consistent with a simple model of structure formation which assumes only that galaxies form within dark matter halos, that Lyman-break galaxies' rest-UV luminosities are tightly correlated with their dark masses, and that matter fluctuations are Gaussian and have a linear power-spectrum shape at z~3 similar to that determined locally (\Gamma~0.2). This conclusion is largely independent of cosmology or spectral normalization \sigma_8. A measurement of the masses of Lyman-break galaxies would in principle distinguish between different cosmological scenarios.
  • We summarize the status of a ``targeted'' redshift survey aimed at establishing the properties of galaxies and their large scale distribution in the redshift range 2.5 < z < 3.5. At the time of this writing, we have obtained spectra of more than 400 galaxies in this redshift range, all identified using the ``Lyman break'' color-selection technique. We present some of the first results on the general clustering properties of the Lyman break galaxies. The galaxies are very strongly clustered, with co-moving correlation length similar to present-day galaxies, and they are evidently strongly biased relative to the mass distribution at these early epochs, which is consistent with hierarchical galaxy formation models if Lyman break galaxies trace the most massive halos at z ~ 3. Prospects for large surveys for galaxies beyond z ~ 4 are discussed.
  • We report the discovery of a highly significant concentration of galaxies at a redshift of <z>=3.090. The structure is evident in a redshift histogram of photometrically selected ``Lyman break'' objects in a 9' by 18' field in which we have obtained 78 spectroscopic redshifts in the range 2.0 < z <3.4. The dimensions of the structure projected on the plane of the sky are at least 11'by 8', or 14h_{70}^{-1} by 10h_{70}^{-1} Mpc (comoving; \Omega_M=1). The concentration contains 15 galaxies and one faint (R=21.7) QSO. We consider the structure in the context of a number of cosmological models and argue that Lyman-break galaxies must be very biased tracers of mass, with an effective bias on mass scale M~10^{15}M_{\sun} ranging from b~2 for \Omega_M=0.2 to b >~6 for \Omega_M=1. In a Cold Dark Matter scenario the large bias values suggest that individual Lyman-break galaxies are associated with dark halos of mass M~10^{12} M_{\sun}, reinforcing the interpretation of these objects as the progenitors of massive galaxies at the present epoch. Preliminary results of spectroscopy in additional fields suggest that such large structures are common at z~3, with about one similar structure per survey field. The implied space density is consistent with the possibility that we are observing moderately rich clusters of galaxies in their early non-linear evolution. Finally, the spectrum of one of the QSOs discovered in our survey (z_{em} = 3.356) exhibits metal line absorption systems within the 3 redshift bins having the largest number of galaxies in field, z = 2.93, 3.09, and 3.28. These results are the first from an ongoing ``targeted'' redshift survey designed to explore the nature and distribution of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 2.7 <~ z <~ 3.4.
  • We present very deep WFPC2 images and FOS spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) together with numerous supporting ground-based observations of the field of the quasar 3C 336 ($z_{em}=0.927$). The observations are designed to investigate the nature of galaxies producing metal line absorption systems in the spectrum of the QSO. Along a single line of sight, we find at least 6 metal line absorption systems (of which 3 are newly discovered) ranging in redshift from 0.317 to 0.892. Through an extensive program of optical and IR imaging, QSO spectroscopy, and faint galaxy spectroscopy, we have identified 5 of the 6 metal line absorption systems with luminous (L_K > 0.1 L*_K) galaxies. These have morphologies ranging from very late-type spiral to S0, and exhibit a wide range of inclination and position angles with respect to the QSO sightline. The only unidentified absorber, despite our intensive search, is a damped Lyman $\alpha$ system at $z_{abs}=0.656$. Analysis of the absorption spectrum suggests that the metal abundances ([Fe/H]$=-1.2$) in this system are similar to those in damped systems at $z \sim 2$, and to the two other damped systems for which abundances have been determined at $z <1$. We have found no examples of intrinsically faint galaxies ($L < 0.1 L^{\ast}$) at small impact parameters that might have been missed as absorber candidates in our previous ground-based imaging and spectroscopic programs on MgII absorbing galaxies. There are no bright galaxies (L > 0.1 L_K) within 50h^{-1} kpc which do not produce detectable metal lines (of Mg II 2796, 2803 and/or C IV 1548, 1550) in the QSO spectrum. All of these results generally support the inferences which we have previously reached from a larger survey for absorption-selected galaxies at $z\simlt 1$.
  • We report the discovery of a substantial population of star--forming galaxies at $3.0 \simlt z \simlt 3.5$. These galaxies have been selected using color criteria sensitive to the presence of a Lyman continuum break superposed on an otherwise very blue far-UV continuum, and then confirmed with deep spectroscopy on the W. M. Keck telescope. The surface density of galaxies brighter than R=25 with 3 < z < 3.5 is $0.4\pm0.07$ galaxies arcmin$^{-2}$, approximately 1.3\% of the deep counts at these magnitudes; this value applies both to ``random'' fields and to fields centered on known QSOs. The corresponding co-moving space density is approximately half that of luminous ($L \simgt L^{\ast}$) present--day galaxies. Our sample of $z > 3$ galaxies is large enough that we can begin to detail the spectroscopic characteristics of the population as a whole. The spectra of the $z>3$ galaxies are remarkably similar to those of nearby star-forming galaxies, the dominant features being strong low--ionization interstellar absorption lines and high--ionization stellar lines, often with P-Cygni profiles characteristic of Wolf-Rayet and O--star winds. Lyman $\alpha$ emission is generally weak ($< 20$ \AA\ rest equivalent width) and is absent for >50% of the galaxies. The star formation rates, measured directly from the far-UV continua, lie in the range 4-25 $h_{50}^{-2}$ M$\sun$ yr$^{-1}$ for $q_0=0.5$. Together with the morphological properties of the $z>3$ galaxy population, which we discuss in a companion paper (Giavalisco \et 1996), all of these findings strongly suggest that we have identified the high-redshift counterparts of the spheroid component of present--day luminous galaxies. In any case, it is clear that massive galaxy formation was already well underway by $z \sim 3.5$. (shortened abstract). arch-ive/yymmnnn
  • We present results of surveys for high redshift galaxies selected by their having produced detectable Mg~II and Lyman limit absorption in the spectra of background QSOs. We discuss the properties of the absorbing galaxies, the connection between galaxy properties and absorption line signatures, and how a combination of QSO absorption line and conventional faint galaxy techniques can be used to study field galaxy evolution to very large redshifts.
  • We present the results of deep Lyman limit imaging in four new fields as part of a continuing search for galaxies at $3.0 \le z \le 3.5$. The technique uses a custom broad--band filter set ($U_n G {\cal R}$) designed to isolate objects having Lyman continuum breaks superposed on otherwise flat--spectrum ultraviolet continua. The observations are specifically aimed at detecting known galaxies producing optically thick QSO metal line absorption systems, but are equally sensitive to more generally distributed objects at the redshifts of interest. Together with previously published results of the survey, we have now detected in two out of six cases objects with the expected properties of star--forming galaxies at $z \simgt 3$ within 3~arcsec of the QSO sight lines; the two candidate absorbers have similar luminosities, $M_B \simeq -22$ ($q_0=0.5$, $H_0=50$ \kms Mpc$^{-1}$), and impact parameters, $R \sim 10~h^{-1}$~kpc. The average surface density of robust Lyman break objects is $\sim 0.5$ galaxies per square arcminute to a magnitude limit ${\cal R} = 25.0$. A simple, ``no evolution'' model based on the properties of normal galaxies at $z \simlt 1$ predicts a density of Lyman break objects only a few times larger than observed. We conclude that there is a substantial population of star--forming galaxies, of relatively normal luminosity, already in place at $z = 3 - 3.5$.
  • We present {\it Hubble Space Telescope} and ground--based data on the $z_{abs}=0.8596$ metal line absorption system along the line of sight to PKS 0454+0356. The system is a moderate redshift damped Lyman alpha system, with ${\rm N(HI)}=(5.7\pm0.3)\times10^{20}$~cm$^{-2}$ as measured from the {\it Faint Object Spectrograph} spectrum. We also present ground--based images which we use to identify the galaxy which most probably gives rise to the damped system; the most likely candidate is relatively underluminous by QSO absorber standards ($M_B \sim -19.0$ for $q_0=0.5$ and $H_0=50$ \kms Mpc$^{-1}$), and lies $\sim 8.5h^{-1}$ kpc in projection from the QSO sightline. Ground--based measurements of Zn~II, Cr~II, and Fe~II absorption lines from this system allow us to infer abundances of [Zn/H]=$-1.1$, [Cr/H]=$-1.2$, and [Fe/H]=$-1.2$, indicating overall metallicity similar to damped systems at $z >2$, and that the depletion of Cr and Fe onto dust grains may be even {\it less} important than in many of the high redshift systems of comparable metallicity. Limits previously placed on the 21-cm optical depth in the $z=0.8596$ system, together with our new N(H~I) measurement, suggest a very high spin temperature for the H~I, $T_S >> 580$ K.
  • We present some of the results of a large survey aimed at establishing the properties of galaxies selected by their having produced detectable Mg~II $\lambda\lambda 2796$, 2803 absorption in the spectra of background QSOs. The present sample covers the redshift range $0.2 \le z \le 1.0 $, with $\langle z \rangle = 0.65$. From an extensive program of optical and near-IR imaging and optical spectroscopy, we find that the galaxies appear to be similar to normal galaxies at the present epoch, ranging from late--type spiral galaxies to those whose spectra and colors resemble present--day ellipticals. Contrary to some faint field galaxy samples selected using different criteria, over the redshift range observed we find no evidence for significant evolution in rest--frame $B-K$ color, space density, or (rest--frame $B$ or $K$) luminosity. The ``average'' Mg~II absorbing galaxy appears to be consistent with a normal 0.7$L_B^{\ast}$ Sb galaxy having a roughly constant star formation rate since $z \sim 1$, although galaxies spanning a range of a factor of $\sim 70$ in luminosity are found in the absorber sample. The diffuse gas cross-section selection imposed by studies of this kind appears to be biased {\it against} the relatively underluminous, blue galaxies which apparently dominate the number counts at faint magnitudes. However, essentially all ``normal'' field galaxies, independent of spectroscopic type, appear to be potential QSO absorbers.
  • We present results of surveys for high redshift field galaxies selected by their having produced detectable absorption in the spectra of background QSOs. Such surveys, in essence selected by gas cross-section rather than by flux density, are almost completely independent of the conventional magnitude--limited redshift survey, and allow one to follow objects of normal luminosity well beyond $z\sim 1$, the redshift at which many of the standard techniques break down. We summarize the principal results for our completed survey at $z \le 1$, and give the preliminary results of a second survey designed to extend the sample to $z=1.6$. A general conclusion is that normal field galaxies exhibit strikingly little evolution in their space density, luminosity, and optical/IR colors to redshifts as high as $z\sim 1.5$. We discuss both the techniques involved and the implications of the results.