• With electron beam durations down to femtoseconds and sub-femtoseconds achievable in current state-of-the-art accelerators, longitudinal bunch length diagnostics with resolution at the attosecond level are required. In this paper, we present such a novel measurement device which combines a high power laser modulator with an RF deflecting cavity in the orthogonal direction. While the laser applies a strong correlated angular modulation to a beam, the RF deflector ensures the full resolution of this streaking effect across the bunch hence recovering the temporal beam profile with sub-femtosecond resolution. Preliminary measurements to test the key components of this concept were carried out at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory recently, the results of which are presented and discussed here. Moreover, a possible application of the technique for novel accelerator schemes is examined based on simulations with the particle-tracking code elegant and our beam profile reconstruction tool.
  • We present results of an experiment showing the first successful demonstration of a cascaded micro-bunching scheme. Two modulator-chicane pre-bunchers arranged in series and a high power mid-IR laser seed are used to modulate a 52 MeV electron beam into a train of sharp microbunches phase-locked to the external drive laser. This configuration allows to increase the fraction of electrons trapped in a strongly tapered inverse free electron laser (IFEL) undulator to 96\%, with up to 78\% of the particles accelerated to the final design energy yielding a significant improvement compared to the classical single buncher scheme. These results represent a critical advance in laser-based longitudinal phase space manipulations and find application both in high gradient advanced acceleration as well as in high peak and average power coherent radiation sources.
  • Inverse Compton scattering (ICS) is a unique mechanism for producing fast pulses - picosecond and below - of bright X- to gamma-rays. These nominally narrow spectral bandwidth electromagnetic radiation pulses are efficiently produced in the interaction between intense, well-focused electron and laser beams. The spectral characteristics of such sources are affected by many experimental parameters, such as the bandwidth of the laser, and the angles of both the electrons and laser photons at collision. The laser field amplitude induces harmonic generation and importantly, for the present work, nonlinear red shifting, both of which dilute the spectral brightness of the radiation. As the applications enabled by this source often depend sensitively on its spectra, it is critical to resolve the details of the wavelength and angular distribution obtained from ICS collisions. With this motivation, we present here an experimental study that greatly improves on previous spectral measurement methods based on X-ray K-edge filters, by implementing a multi-layer bent-crystal X-ray spectrometer. In tandem with a collimating slit, this method reveals a projection of the double-differential angular-wavelength spectrum of the ICS radiation in a single shot. The measurements enabled by this diagnostic illustrate the combined off-axis and nonlinear-field-induced red shifting in the ICS emission process. They reveal in detail the strength of the normalized laser vector potential, and provide a non-destructive measure of the temporal and spatial electron-laser beam overlap.
  • A method for producing narrow-band THz radiation proposes passing an ultra-relativistic beam through a metallic pipe with small periodic corrugations. We present results of a measurement of such an arrangement at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). Our pipe was copper and was 5 cm long; the aperture was cylindrically symmetric, with a 1 mm (radius) bore and a corrugation depth (peak-to-peak) of 60 um. In the experiment we measured both the effect on the beam of the structure wakefield and the spectral properties of the radiation excited by the beam. We began by injecting a relatively long beam compared to the wavelength of the radiation to excite the structure, and then used a downstream spectrometer to infer the radiation wavelength. This was followed by injecting a shorter bunch, and then using an interferometer (also downstream of the corrugated pipe) to measure the spectrum of the induced THz radiation.
  • A 60 MeV beam at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) was manipulated by a planar tunable de-chirper made out of two 10 cm long dielectric slabs with copper plated backs. While the gap was changed from 5.8 mm to 1 mm, the correlated energy chirp of the low charge electron bunch was reduced from approximately 330 keV/mm to zero. This result is in agreement with simulations. Calculations show that similar devices, properly scaled to account for the expected electron bunch charge and length, can be used to remove residual correlated energy spread at the end of the linacs used for free-electron lasers (FEL). Potentially, this technique could significantly simplify linac design and improve FEL performance.
  • The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM) system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1 m for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.
  • We present the design and preliminary results of a prototype beam-based digital feedback system for the Interaction Point of the International Linear Collider. A custom analogue front-end processor, FPGA-based digital signal processing board, and kicker drive amplifier have been designed, built, and tested on the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The system was measured to have a latency of approximately 140 ns.