• Exceptional points (EPs) associated with a square-root singularity have been found in many non-Hermitian systems. In most of the studies, the EPs found are isotropic meaning that the same singular behavior is obtained independent of the direction from which they are approached in the parameter space. In this work, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally the existence of an anisotropic EP in an acoustic system that shows different singular behaviors when the anisotropic EP is approached from different directions in the parameter space. Such an anisotropic EP arises from the coalescence of two square-root EPs having the same chirality.
  • We measured the electromagnetic stress-induced local strain distribution on a centimeter-sized parallel-plate metallic resonant unit illuminated with microwave. Using a fiber interferometer, we found that the strain changes sign across the resonant unit, in agreement with theoretical predictions that the attractive electric and repulsive magnetic forces act at different locations. The enhancement of the corresponding maximum local electromagnetic stress is stronger than the enhancement of the net force, reaching a factor of >600 compared to the ordinary radiation pressure.
  • We study the exceptional point (EP) phenomena in a photonic medium with a complex time-periodic permiitivity, i.e., $\epsilon(t)=\epsilon_o+\epsilon_r*sin(\Omega t+\phi)$. We formulate the Maxwell's equations in a form of first-order non-Hermitian Floquet Hamiltonian matrix and solve it analytically for the Floquet band structures. In the case when $\epsilon_r$ is real, to the first order in $\epsilon_r$, the band structures show a phase transition from an exact phase with real quasienergies to a broken phase with complex quasienergies inside a region of wave vector space, the so-called k-gap. We show that the two EPs at the upper and lower edges of the k-gap have opposite chiralities in the stroboscopic sense. Thus, by picking up the mode with a positive imaginary quasienergy, the wave propagation inside the k-gap can grow exponentially. In three dimensions, such pairs of EPs span two concentric spherical surfaces in the $\vec{k}$ space and repeat themselves periodically in the quasienergy space with Omega as the period. However, in the case when $\epsilon_r$ is pure imaginary, the k-gap disappears and gaps in the quasienergy space are opened. Our analytical results agree well with the finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. To the second order in $\epsilon_r$, additional EP pairs are found for both the cases of real and imaginary $\epsilon_r$.
  • The most intriguing properties of non-Hermitian systems are found near the exceptional points (EPs) at which the Hamiltonian matrix becomes defective. Due to the complex topological structure of the energy Riemann surfaces close to an EP and the breakdown of the adiabatic theorem due to non-Hermiticity, the state evolution in non-Hermitian systems is much more complex than that in Hermitian systems. For example, recent experimental work [Doppler et al. Nature 537, 76 (2016)] demonstrated that dynamically encircling an EP can lead to chiral behaviors, i.e., encircling an EP in different directions results in different output states. Here, we propose a coupled ferromagnetic waveguide system that carries two EPs and design an experimental setup in which the trajectory of state evolution can be controlled in situ using a tunable external field, allowing us to dynamically encircle zero, one or even two EPs experimentally. The tunability allows us to control the trajectory of encircling in the parameter space, including the size of the encircling loop and the starting/end point. We discovered that whether or not the dynamics is chiral actually depends on the starting point of the loop. In particular, dynamically encircling an EP with a starting point in the parity-time-broken phase results in non-chiral behaviors such that the output state is the same no matter which direction the encircling takes. The proposed system is a useful platform to explore the topology of energy surfaces and the dynamics of state evolution in non-Hermitian systems and will likely find applications in mode switching controlled with external parameters.
  • Topological characteristics of energy bands, such as Dirac/Weyl nodes, have attracted substantial interest in condensed matter systems as well as in classical wave systems. Among these energy bands, the type-II Dirac point is a nodal degeneracy with tilted conical dispersion, leading to a peculiar crossing dispersion in the constant energy plane. Such nodal points have recently been found in electronic materials. The analogous topological feature in photonic systems remains a theoretical curiosity, with experimental realization expected to be challenging. Here, we experimentally realize the type-II Dirac point using a planar metasurface architecture, where the band degeneracy point is protected by the underlying mirror symmetry of the metasurface. Gapless edge modes are found and measured at the boundary between the different domains of the symmetry-broken metasurface. Our work shows that metasurfaces are simple and practical platforms for realizing electromagnetic type-II Dirac points, and their planar structure is a distinct advantage that facilitates applications in two-dimensional topological photonics.
  • The concept of gauge field is a cornerstone of modern physics and the synthetic gauge field has emerged as a new way to manipulate neutral particles in many disciplines. In optics, several schemes have been proposed to realize Abelian synthetic gauge fields. Here, we introduce a new platform for realizing synthetic $SU(2)$ non-Abelian gauge fields acting on two-dimensional optical waves in a wide class of anisotropic materials and discover new phenomena. We show that a virtual non-Abelian Lorentz force can arise from the material anisotropy, which can induce wave packets to travel along wavy "Zitterbewegung" trajectories even in homogeneous media. We further propose an interferometry scheme to realize the non-Abelian Aharonov--Bohm effect of light, which highlights the essential non-Abelian nature of the system. We also show that the Wilson loop of an arbitrary closed optical path can be extracted from a series of gauge fixed points in the interference fringes.
  • When a dynamic system undergoes a cyclic evolution, a geometric phase that depends only on the path traversed in parameter space can arise in addition to the normal dynamical phase. These geometric phases have profound impacts in both quantum and classical physics. In addition to the geometric phase associated with band structures in reciprocal space that has led to the discovery of topological insulators, the spin-redirection geometric phase induced by the $SO$(3) rotation of states in real space can also give rise to intriguing phenomena such as the photonic analog of the spin Hall effect. By exploiting the orbital angular momentum of sound vortices, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the spin-redirection geometric phase effects in airborne sound, which is a scalar wave without spin. We show that these effects, associated with the helical transport of sound, can be used to control the flow of sound. This finding opens new possibilities for the manipulation of scalar wave propagation by exploiting spin-redirection geometric phases.
  • Plasmonics has attracted much attention not only because it has useful properties such as strong field enhancement, but also because it reveals the quantum nature of matter. To handle quantum plasmonics effects, ab initio packages or empirical Feibelman d-parameters have been used to explore the quantum correction of plasmonic resonances. However, most of these methods are formulated within the quasi-static framework. The self-consistent hydrodynamics model offers a reliable approach to study quantum plasmonics because it can incorporate the quantum effect of the electron gas into classical electrodynamics in a consistent manner. Instead of the standard scattering method, we formulate the self-consistent hydrodynamics method as an eigenvalue problem to study quantum plasmonics with electrons and photons treated on the same footing. We find that the eigenvalue approach must involve a global operator, which originates from the energy functional of the electron gas. This manifests the intrinsic nonlocality of the response of quantum plasmonic resonances. Our model gives the analytical forms of quantum corrections to plasmonic modes, incorporating quantum electron spill-out effects and electrodynamical retardation. We apply our method to study the quantum surface plasmon polariton for a single flat interface.
  • Recent advances in nanotechnology have created tremendous excitement across different disciplines but in order to fully control and manipulate nano-scale objects, we must understand the forces at work at the nano-scale, which can be very different from those that dominate the macro-scale. We show that there is a new kind of curvature-induced force that acts between nano-corrugated electrically neutral plasmonic surfaces. Absent in flat surfaces, such a force owes its existence entirely to geometric curvature, and originates from the kinetic energy associated with the electron density which tends to make the profile of the electron density smoother than that of the ionic background and hence induces curvature-induced local charges. Such a force cannot be found using standard classical electromagnetic approaches, and we use a self-consistent hydrodynamics model as well as first principles density functional calculations to explore the character of such forces. These two methods give qualitative similar results. We found that the force can be attractive or repulsive, depending on the details of the nano-corrugation, and its magnitude is comparable to light induced forces acting on plasmonic nano-objects.
  • It is commonly believed that Anderson localized states and extended states do not coexist at the same energy. Here we propose a simple mechanism to achieve the coexistence of localized and extended states in a band in a class of disordered quasi-1D and quasi-2D systems. The systems are partially disordered in a way that a band of extended states always exists, not affected by the randomness, whereas the states in all other bands become localized. The extended states can overlap with the localized states both in energy and in space, achieving the aforementioned coexistence. We demonstrate such coexistence in disordered multi-chain and multi-layer systems.
  • Weyl fermions have not been found in nature as elementary particles, but they emerge as nodal points in the band structure of electronic and classical wave crystals. Novel phenomena such as Fermi arcs and chiral anomaly have fueled the interest in these topological points which are frequently perceived as monopoles in momentum space. Here we report the experimental observation of generalized optical Weyl points inside the parameter space of a photonic crystal with a specially designed four-layer unit cell. The reflection at the surface of a truncated photonic crystal exhibits phase vortexes due to the synthetic Weyl points, which in turn guarantees the existence of interface states between photonic crystals and any reflecting substrates. The reflection phase vortexes have been confirmed for the first time in our experiments which serve as an experimental signature of the generalized Weyl points. The existence of these interface states is protected by the topological properties of the Weyl points and the trajectories of these states in the parameter space resembles those of Weyl semimetal "Fermi arcs surface states" in momentum space. Tracing the origin of interface states to the topological character of the parameter space paves the way for a rational design of strongly localized states with enhanced local field.
  • The calculation of optical force density distribution within a material is challenging at the nanoscale, where quantum and non-local effects emerge and macroscopic parameters such as permittivity become ill-defined. We demonstrate that the microscopic optical force density of nanoplasmonic systems can be defined and calculated using a self-consistent hydrodynamics model that includes quantum, non-local and retardation effects. We demonstrate this technique by calculating the microscopic optical force density distributions and the optical binding force induced by external light on nanoplasmonic dimers. We discover that an uneven distribution of optical force density can lead to a spinning torque acting on individual particles.
  • Plasmonic resonances of nanoparticles have drawn lots of attentions due to their interesting and useful properties such as strong field enhancements. These systems are typically studied using either classical electrodynamics or fully quantum theory. Each approach can handle some aspects of plasmonic systems accurately and efficiently, while having its own limitation. The self-consistent hydrodynamics model has the advantage that it can incorporate the quantum effect of the electron gas into classical electrodynamics in a consistent way. We use the method to study the plasmonic response of polygonal particles under the influence of an external electromagnetic wave, and we pay particular attention to the size and shape of the particle and the effect of charging. We find that the particles support edge modes, face modes and hybrid modes. The charges induced by the external field in the edge (face) modes mainly localize at the edges (faces), while the induced charges in the hybrid modes are distributed nearly evenly in both the edges and faces. The edge modes are less sensitive to particle size than the face modes, but are sensitive to the corner angles of the edges. When the number of sides of regular polygons increases, the edge and face modes gradually change into the classical dipole plasmonic mode of a cylinder. The hybrid modes are found to be the precursor of the Bennett mode, which cannot be found in classical electrodynamics.
  • Exceptional points are degeneracies in non-Hermitian systems. A two-state system with parity-time (PT) symmetry usually has only one exceptional point beyond which the eigenmodes are PT-symmetry broken. The so-called symmetry recovery, i.e., eigenmodes become PT-symmetric again, typically occurs in multi-state systems. Here we show that a two-state ferromagnetic waveguide system can have an exceptional point and a subsequent symmetry recovery due to the presence of accidental degeneracy points when the system is lossless. By introducing a parameter space where both exceptional points reside, we designed a system in which the trajectory in the parameter space can be controlled in situ using an adiabatically tunable external field, allowing us to explore the topological and chiral character of the system by encircling zero, one or two exceptional points. We performed microwave experiments to demonstrate the presence of the exceptional point, symmetry recovery, and the effects arising from their dynamical encircling.
  • The geometric phase and topological property for one-dimensional hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystals consisting of a simple lattice of graphene sheets are investigated systematically. For transverse magnetic waves, both plasmonic and photonic modes exist in the momentum space. The accidental degeneracy point of these two kinds of modes is identified to be a diabolic point accompanied with a topological phase transition. For a closed loop around this degeneracy point, the Berry phase is Pi as a consequence of the discontinuous jump of the geometric Zak phase. The wave impedance is calculated analytically for the semi-infinite system, and the corresponding topological interface states either start from or terminate at the degeneracy point. This type of localized interface states may find potential applications in photonics and plasmonics.
  • Casimir forces are of fundamental interest because they originate from quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Apart from controlling the Casimir force via the optical properties of the materials, a number of novel geometries have been proposed to generate repulsive and/or non-monotonic Casimir forces between bodies separated by vacuum gaps. Experimental realization of these geometries, however, is hindered by the difficulties in alignment when the bodies are brought into close proximity. Here, using an on-chip platform with integrated force sensors and actuators, we circumvent the alignment problem and measure the Casimir force between two surfaces with nanoscale protrusions. We demonstrate that the Casimir force depends non-monotonically on the displacement. At some displacements, the Casimir force leads to an effective stiffening of the nanomechanical spring. Our findings pave the way for exploiting the Casimir force in nanomechanical systems using structures of complex and non-conventional shapes.
  • We discovered novel Anderson localization behaviors of pseudospin systems in a 1D disordered potential. For a pseudospin-1 system, due to the absence of backscattering under normal incidence and the presence of a conical band structure, the wave localization behaviors are entirely different from those of normal disordered systems. We show both numerically and analytically that there exists a critical strength of random potential ($W_c$), which is equal to the incident energy ($E$), below which the localization length $\xi$ decreases with the random strength $W$ for a fixed incident angle $\theta$. But the localization length drops abruptly to a minimum at $W=W_c$ and rises immediately afterwards, which has never been observed in ordinary materials. The incidence angle dependence of the localization length has different asymptotic behaviors in two regions of random strength, with $\xi \propto \sin^{-4}\theta$ when $W<W_c$ and $\xi \propto \sin^{-2}\theta$ when $W>W_c$. Experimentally, for a given disordered sample with a fixed randomness strength $W$, the incident wave with incident energy $E$ will experience two different types of localization, depending on whether $E>W$ or $E<W$. The existence of a sharp transition at $E=W$ is due to the emergence of evanescent waves in the systems when $E<W$. Such localization behavior is unique to pseudospin-1 systems. For pseudospin-1/2 systems, there is a minimum localization length as randomness increases, but the transition from decreasing to increasing localization length at the minimum is smooth rather than abrupt. In both decreasing and increasing regions, the $\theta$ -dependence of the localization length has the same asymptotic behavior $\xi \propto \sin^{-2}\theta$.
  • We propose and investigate a new type of metamaterial structure composing of several interpenetrating wire meshes. Calculated band structures show that they exhibit index ellipsoids locating at nonzero k-point in long wavelength limit. We can comprehend these quasistatic modes by Poison's equation and find these modes do not rely on the detailed geometry of the wires but the connectivities of the wires. We can engineer the locations of index ellipsoid by designing the connectivities of the wire meshes.
  • Weyl fermions1 do not appear in nature as elementary particles, but they are now found to exist as nodal points in the band structure of electronic and classical wave crystals. Novel phenomena such as Fermi arcs and chiral anomaly have fueled the interest of these topological points which are frequently perceived as monopoles in momentum space. Here, we demonstrate that generalized Weyl points can exist in a parameter space and we report the first observation of such nodal points in one-dimensional photonic crystals in the optical range. The reflection phase inside the band gap of a truncated photonic crystal exhibits vortexes in the parameter space where the Weyl points are defined and they share the same topological charges as the Weyl points. These vortexes guarantee the existence of interface states, the trajectory of which can be understood as "Fermi arcs" emerging from the Weyl nodes.
  • In this paper, we investigate the band properties of 2D honeycomb plasmonic lattices consisting of metallic nanoparticles. By means of the coupled dipole method and quasi-static approximation, we theoretically analyze the band structures stemming from near-field interaction of localized surface plasmon polaritons for both the infinite lattice and ribbons. Naturally, the interaction of point dipoles decouples into independent out-of-plane and in-plane polarizations. For the out-of-plane modes, both the bulk spectrum and the range of the momentum $k_{\parallel}$ where edge states exist in ribbons are similar to the electronic bands in graphene. Nevertheless, the in-plane polarized modes show significant differences, which do not only possess additional non-flat edge states in ribbons, but also have different distributions of the flat edge states in reciprocal space. For in-plane polarized modes, we derived the bulk-edge correspondence, namely, the relation between the number of flat edge states at a fixed $k_\parallel$, Zak phases of the bulk bands and the winding number associated with the bulk hamiltonian, and verified it through four typical ribbon boundaries, i.e. zigzag, bearded zigzag, armchair, and bearded armchair. Our approach gives a new topological understanding of edge states in such plasmonic systems, and may also apply to other 2D "vector wave" systems.
  • Interface states in photonic crystals usually require defects or surface/interface decorations. We show here that one can control interface states in 1D photonic crystals through the engineering of geometrical phase such that interface states can be guaranteed in even or odd, or in all photonic bandgaps. We verify experimentally the designed interface states in 1D multilayered photonic crystals fabricated by electron beam vapor deposition. We also obtain the geometrical phases by measuring the reflection phases at the bandgaps of the PCs and achieve good agreement with the theory. Our approach could provide a platform for the design of using interface states in photonic crystals for nonlinear optic, sensing, and lasing applications
  • We show that Weyl points with topological charges 1 and 2 can be found in very simple chiral woodpile photonic crystals, which can be fabricated using current techniques down to the nano-scale. The sign of the topological charges can be tuned by changing the material parameters of the crystal, keeping the structure and the symmetry unchanged. The underlying physics can be understood using a tight binding model, which shows that the sign of the charge depends on the hopping range. Gapless surface states and their back-scattering immune properties are also demonstrated in these systems.
  • A slab with relative permittivity $\epsilon = - 1 + i\delta$ and permeability $\mu = - 1 + i\delta $ has a critical distance away from the slab where a small particle will either be cloaked or imaged depending on whether it is located inside or outside that critical distance. We find that the optical force acting on a small cylinder under plane wave illumination reaches a maximum value at this critical distance. Contrary to the usual observation that superlens systems should be highly loss-sensitive, this maximum optical force remains a constant when loss is changed within a certain range. For a fixed particle-slab distance, increasing loss can even amplify the optical force acting on the small cylinder, contrary to the usual belief that loss compromises the response of supenlens.
  • It is well known that a closed loop of magnetic dipoles can give rise to the rather elusive toroidal moment. However, artificial structures required to generate the necessary magnetic moments are typically optically large, complex to make and easily compromised by the kinetic inductance at high frequencies. Instead of using magnetic dipoles, we propose a minimal model based on just three aligned discrete electric dipoles in which the occurrence of resonant toroidal modes is guaranteed by symmetry. The advantage of this model is its simplicity and the same model supports toroidal moments from the microwave regime up to optical frequencies as exemplified by a three-antenna array and a system consisting of three nano-sized plasmonic particles. Both the microwave and high-frequency configurations exhibit non-radiating "anapoles". Experiments in the microwave regime confirm the theoretical predictions.
  • It is well known that inversion symmetry in one-dimensional (1D) systems leads to the quantization of the geometric Zak phase to values of either 0 or {\pi}. When the system has particle-hole symmetry, this topological property ensures the existence of zero-energy interface states at the interface of two bulk systems carrying different Zak phases. In the absence of inversion symmetry, the Zak phase can take any value and the existence of interface states is not ensured. We show here that the situation is different when the unit cell contains multiple degrees of freedom and a hidden inversion symmetry exists in a subspace of the system. As an example, we consider a system of two Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) chains coupled by a coupler chain. Although the introduction of coupler chain breaks the inversion symmetry of the system, a certain hidden inversion symmetry ensures the existence of a decoupled $2\times2$ SSH Hamiltonian in the subspace of the entire system and the two bands associated with this subspace have quantized Zak phases. These "quantized" bands in turn can provide topological boundary or interface states in such systems. Since the entire system has no inversion symmetry, the bulk-boundary correspondence may not hold exactly. The above is also true when next-nearest-neighbor hoppings are included. Our systems can be realized straightforwardly in systems such as coupled single-mode optical waveguides or coupled acoustic cavities.