• $Aims.$ We study the relation between the jet and the outflow in the IRAS 04166+2706 protostar. This Taurus protostar drives a molecular jet that contains multiple emission peaks symmetrically located from the central source. The protostar also drives a wide-angle outflow consisting of two conical shells. $Methods.$ We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) interferometer to observe two fields along the IRAS 04166+2706 jet. The fields were centered on a pair of emission peaks that correspond to the same ejection event, and were observed in CO(2-1), SiO(5-4), and SO(65-54). $ Results.$ Both ALMA fields present spatial distributions that are approximately elliptical and have their minor axes aligned with the jet direction. As the velocity increases, the emission in each field moves gradually across the elliptical region. This systematic pattern indicates that the emitting gas in each field lies in a disk-like structure that is perpendicular to the jet axis and is expanding away from the jet. A small degree of curvature in the first-moment maps indicates that the disks are slightly curved in the manner expected for bow shocks moving away from the IRAS source. A simple geometrical model confirms that this scenario fits the main emission features. $Conclusions.$ The emission peaks in the IRAS 04166+2706 jet likely represent internal bow shocks where material is being ejected laterally away from the jet axis. While the linear momentum of the ejected gas is dominated by the component in the jet direction, the sideways component is not negligible, and can potentially affect the distribution of gas in the surrounding outflow and core.
  • To investigate the disk formation and jet launch in protostars is crucial to comprehend the earliest stages of star and planet formation. We aim to constrain the properties of the molecular jet and the disk of the HH 212 protostellar system at unprecedented angular scales through ALMA observations of sulfur-bearing molecules, SO 9(8)-8(7), SO 10(11)-10(10), SO2 8(2,6)-7(1,7). SO 9(8)-8(7) and SO2 8(2,6)-7(1,7) show broad velocity profiles. At systemic velocity they probe the circumstellar gas and the cavity walls. Going from low to high blue-/red-shifted velocities the emission traces the wide-angle outflow and the fast (~100-200 km/s) and collimated (~90 AU) molecular jet revealing the inner knots with timescales <50 years. The jet transports a mass loss rate >0.2-2e-6 Msun/yr, implying high ejection efficiency (>0.03-0.3). The SO and SO2 abundances in the jet are ~1e-7-1e-6. SO 10(11)-10(10) emission is compact and shows small-scale velocity gradients indicating that it originates partly from the rotating disk previously seen in HCO+ and C17O, and partly from the base of the jet. The disk mass is >0.002-0.013 Msun, and the SO abundance in the disk is ~1e-8-1e-7. SO and SO2 are effective tracers of the molecular jet in the inner few hundreds AU from the protostar. Their abundances indicate that 1% - 40% of sulfur is in SO and SO2 due to shocks in the jet/outflow and/or to ambipolar diffusion at the wind base. The SO abundance in the disk is 3-4 orders of magnitude larger than in evolved protoplanetary disks. This may be due to an SO enhancement in the accretion shock at the envelope-disk interface or in spiral shocks if the disk is partly gravitationally unstable.
  • Context. The previously identified source SSTB213 J041757 is a proto brown dwarf candidate in Taurus, which has two possible components A and B. It was found that component B is probably a class 0/I proto brown dwarf associated with an extended envelope. Aims. Studying molecular outflows from young brown dwarfs provides important insight into brown dwarf formation mechanisms, particularly brown dwarfs at the earliest stages such as class 0, I. We therefore conducted a search for molecular outflows from SSTB213 J041757. Methods. We observed SSTB213 J041757 with the Submillimeter Array to search for CO molecular outflow emission from the source. Results. Our CO maps do not show any outflow emission from the proto brown dwarf candidate. Conclusions. The non-detection implies that the molecular outflows from the source are weak; deeper observations are therefore needed to probe the outflows from the source.
  • Submillimeter Array 1.3mm line and continuum observations toward the young massive star-forming region IRAS18182-1433 are presented. The data are complemented with short-spacing CO(2-1) observations and SiO(1-0) data from the VLA. Multiple massive outflows emanate from the mm continuum peak. The CO(2-1) data reveal a quadrupolar outflow system consisting of two outflows inclined by \~90 degrees. One outflow exhibits a cone-like red-shifted morphology with a jet-like blue-shifted counterpart where a blue counter-cone can only be tentatively identified. The SiO(1-0) data suggest the presence of a third outflow. Analyzing the 12CO/13CO line ratios indicates decreasing CO line opacities with increasing velocities. The other seven detected molecular species - also high-density tracers like CH3CN, CH3OH, HCOOCH3 - are all ~1-2'' offset from the mm continuum peak, but spatially associated with a strong molecular outflow peak and a cm emission feature indicative of a thermal jet. This spatial displacement between the molecular lines and the mm continuum emission could be either due to an unresolved sub-source at the position of the cm feature, or the outflow/jet itself alters the chemistry of the core enhancing the molecular abundances toward that region. A temperature estimate based on the CH3CN(12_k-11_k) lines suggests temperatures of the order 150K. A velocity analysis of the high-density tracing molecules reveals that at the given spatial resolution none of them shows any coherent velocity structure which would be consistent with a rotating disk. We discuss this lack of rotation signatures and attribute it to intrinsic difficulties to observationally isolate massive accretion disks from the surrounding dense gas envelopes and the molecular outflows.
  • We observed the HH 211 jet in the submillimeter continuum and the CO(3-2) and SiO(8-7) transitions with the Submillimeter Array. The continuum source detected at the center of the outflow shows an elongated morphology, perpendicular to the direction of the outflow axis. The high-velocity emission of both molecules shows a knotty and highly collimated structure. The SiO(8-7) emission at the base of the outflow, close to the driving source, spans a wide range of velocities, from -20 up to 40 km s^{-1}. This suggests that a wide-angle wind may be the driving mechanism of the HH 211 outflow. For distances greater than 5" (1500 AU) from the driving source, emission from both transitions follows a Hubble-law behavior, with SiO(8-7) reaching higher velocities than CO(3-2), and being located upstream of the CO(3-2) knots. This indicates that the SiO(8-7) emission is likely tracing entrained gas very close to the primary jet, while the CO(3-2) is tracing less dense entrained gas. From the SiO(5-4) data of Hirano et al. we find that the SiO(8-7)/SiO(5-4) brightness temperature ratio along the jet decreases for knots far from the driving source. This is consistent with the density decreasing along the jet, from (3-10)x10^6 cm^{-3} at 500 AU to (0.8-4)x10^6 cm^{-3} at 5000 AU from the driving source.