• We report the first observation of the magnon-polariton bistability in a cavity magnonics system consisting of cavity photons strongly interacting with the magnons in a small yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere. The bistable behaviors are emerged as sharp frequency switchings of the cavity magnon-polaritons (CMPs) and related to the transition between states with large and small number of polaritons. In our experiment, we align, respectively, the [100] and [110] crystallographic axes of the YIG sphere parallel to the static magnetic field and find very different bistable behaviors (e.g., clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis loops) in these two cases. The experimental results are well fitted and explained as being due to the Kerr nonlinearity with either positive or negative coefficient. Moreover, when the magnetic field is tuned away from the anticrossing point of CMPs, we observe simultaneous bistability of both magnons and cavity photons by applying a drive field on the lower branch.
  • We experimentally demonstrate magnon Kerr effect in a cavity-magnon system, where magnons in a small yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere are strongly but dispersively coupled to the photons in a three-dimensional cavity. When the YIG sphere is pumped to generate considerable magnons, the Kerr effect yields a perceptible shift of the cavity's central frequency and more appreciable shifts of the magnon modes. We derive an analytical relation between the magnon frequency shift and the drive power for the uniformly magnetized YIG sphere and find that it agrees very well with the experimental results of the Kittel mode. Our study paves the way to explore nonlinear effects in the cavity-magnon system.
  • We demonstrate an on-chip device utilizing the concept of artificial cavity magnon-polariton (CMP) coupling between the microwave cavity mode and the dynamics of the artificial magnetism in a split ring resonator. This on-chip device allows the easy tuning of the artificial CMP gap by using a DC voltage signal, which enables tuneable electrodynamically induced transparency. The high tunability of the artificial magnon-polariton system not only enables the study of the characteristic phenomena associated with distinct coupling regimes, but also may open up avenues for designing novel microwave devices and ultra-sensitive sensors.
  • In the absence of any external applied magnetic field, we have found that a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) can produce a significant output direct voltage under microwave radiation at frequencies, which are far from the ferromagnetic resonance condition, and this voltage signal can be increase by at least an order of magnitude by applying a direct current bias. The enhancement of the microwave detection can be explained by the nonlinear resistance/conductance of the MTJs. Our estimation suggests that optimized MTJs should achieve sensitivities for non-resonant broadband microwave detection of about 5,000 mV/mW.
  • We use electrical detection, in combination with microwave transmission, to investigate both resonant and non-resonant magnon-photon coupling at room temperature. Spin pumping in a dynamically coupled magnon-photon system is found to be distinctly different from previous experiments. Characteristic coupling features such as modes anti-crossing, line width evolution, peculiar line shape, and resonance broadening are systematically measured and consistently analyzed by a theoretical model set on the foundation of classical electrodynamic coupling. Our experimental and theoretical approach pave the way for pursuing microwave coherent manipulation of pure spin current via the combination of spin pumping and magnon-photon coupling.
  • The complex permittivity and permeability of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles has been quantified using a circular waveguide assembly with a static magnetic field to align the nanoparticle's magnetization. The high sensitivity of the measurement provides the precise resonant feature of nanoparticles. The complex permeability in the vicinity of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is in agreement with the nanoparticle's measured magnetization via conventional magnetometry. A rigorous and self-consistent measure of complex permittivities and permeabilities of nanoparticles is crucial to ascertain accurately the dielectric behaviour as well as the frequency response of nanoparticle magnetization, necessary ingredients when designing and optimizing magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.
  • Spin rectification in a single crystal Fe/Au/Fe sandwich is electrically detected for collinear and non-collinear magnetization and external magnetic field configurations. The line shape, line width and signal polarity are analysed. The spin rectication theory has been much extended by taking the magneto-crystalline anisotropy and shape anisotropy into account, which explained non-collinear resonances and agrees very well with experimental data. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of spin rectification in ferromagnetic metal was demonstrated in this work.
  • We develop a method for universally resolving the important issue of separating spin pumping (SP) from spin rectification (SR) signals in bilayer spintronics devices. This method is based on the characteristic distinction of SP and SR, as revealed in their different angular and field symmetries. It applies generally for analyzing charge voltages in bilayers induced by the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), independent of FMR line shape. Hence, it solves the outstanding problem that device specific microwave properties restrict the universal quantification of the spin Hall angle in bilayer devices via FMR experiments. Furthermore, it paves the way for directly measuring the nonlinear evolution of spin current generated by spin pumping. The spin Hall angle in a Py/Pt bilayer is thereby directly measured as 0.021$\pm$0.015 up to a large precession cone angle of about 20$^{\circ}$.
  • We report room temperature electrical detection of spin injection from a ferromagnetic insulator (YIG) into a ferromagnetic metal (Permalloy, Py). Non-equilibrium spins with both static and precessional spin polarizations are dynamically generated by the ferromagnetic resonance of YIG magnetization, and electrically detected by Py as dc and ac spin currents, respectively. The dc spin current is electrically detected via the inverse spin Hall effect of Py, while the ac spin current is converted to a dc voltage via the spin rectification effect of Py which is resonantly enhanced by dynamic exchange interaction between the ac spin current and the Py magnetization. Our results reveal a new path for developing insulator spintronics, which is distinct from the prevalent but controversial approach of using Pt as the spin current detector.
  • This work reviews and examines two particular issues related with the new technique of electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). This powerful technique has been broadly applied for studying magnetization and spin dynamics over the past few years. The first issue is the relation and distinction between different mechanisms that give rise to a photovoltage via FMR in composite magnetic structures, and the second is the proper analysis of the FMR line shape, which remains the "Achilles heel" in interpreting experimental results, especially for either studying the spin pumping effect or quantifying the spin Hall angles via the electrically detected FMR.
  • We report on microwave photovoltage and simultaneous magnetotransport measurements in a (Ga,Mn)As film oriented normal to the magnetic field. We detect the ferromagnetic resonance over a broad frequency range of 2 GHz to 18.5 GHz and determine the spectroscopic g-factor and separate the Gilbert from the inhomogeneous contribution to magnetization relaxation. Temperature dependent measurements below the saturation magnetization indicate that the photovoltage signal can serve as a sensitive tool to study the crystal anisotropy. We demonstrate that the combination of spin dynamics with charge transport is a promising tool to study microstructured ferromagnetic semiconductor samples.
  • We investigate the dc electric response induced by ferromagnetic resonance in ferromagnetic Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) microstrips. The resulting magnetization precession alters the angle of the magnetization with respect to both dc and rf current. Consequently the time averaged anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) changes (photoresistance). At the same time the time-dependent AMR oscillation rectifies a part of the rf current and induces a dc voltage (photovoltage). A phenomenological approach to magnetoresistance is used to describe the distinct characteristics of the photoresistance and photovoltage with a consistent formalism, which is found in excellent agreement with experiments performed on in-plane magnetized ferromagnetic microstrips. Application of the microwave photovoltage effect for rf magnetic field sensing is discussed.