• We aim to understand how stellar parameters such as mass and rotation impact the distribution of starspots on the stellar surface. To this purpose, we have used Doppler imaging to reconstruct the surface brightness distributions of three fully convective M dwarfs with similar rotation rates. We secured high cadence spectral time series observations of the 5.5 AU separation binary GJ 65, comprising GJ 65A (M5.5V, Prot = 0.24 d) and GJ 65B (M6V, Prot = 0.23 d). We also present new observations of GJ 791.2A (M4.5V, Prot = 0.31 d). Observations of each star were made on two nights with UVES, covering a wavelength range from 0.64 - 1.03 microns. The time series spectra reveal multiple line distortions, which we interpret as cool starspots and which are persistent on both nights suggesting stability on the timescale of 3 days. Spots are recovered with resolutions down to 8.3 degs at the equator. The global spot distributions for GJ 791.2A are similar to observations made a year earlier. Similar high latitude and circumpolar spot structure is seen on GJ791.2A and GJ 65A. However, they are surprisingly absent on GJ 65B, which instead reveals more extensive, larger, spots concentrated at intermediate latitudes. All three stars show small amplitude latitude-dependent rotation that is consistent with solid body rotation. We compare our measurements of differential rotation with previous Doppler imaging studies and discuss the results in the wider context of other observational estimates and recent theoretical predictions.
  • We measured the chromospheric activity of the four hot Jupiter hosts WASP-43, WASP-51/HAT-P-30, WASP-72 & WASP-103 to search for anomalous values caused by the close-in companions. The Mount Wilson Ca II H&K S-index was calculated for each star using observations taken with the Robert Stobie Spectrograph at the Southern African Large Telescope. The activity level of WASP-43 is anomalously high relative to its age and falls among the highest values of all known main sequence stars. We found marginal evidence that the activity of WASP-103 is also higher than expected from the system age. We suggest that for WASP-43 and WASP-103 star-planet interactions (SPI) may enhance the Ca II H&K core emission. The activity levels of WASP-51/HAT-P-30 and WASP-72 are anomalously low, with the latter falling below the basal envelope for both main sequence and evolved stars. This can be attributed to circumstellar absorption due to planetary mass loss, though absorption in the ISM may contribute. A quarter of known short period planet hosts exhibit anomalously low activity levels, including systems with hot Jupiters and low mass companions. Since SPI can elevate and absorption can suppress the observed chromospheric activity of stars with close-in planets, their Ca II H&K activity levels are an unreliable age indicator. Systems where the activity is depressed by absorption from planetary mass loss are key targets for examining planet compositions through transmission spectroscopy.
  • Accounting for stellar activity is a crucial component of the search for ever-smaller planets orbiting stars of all spectral types. We use Doppler imaging methods to demonstrate that starspot induced radial velocity variability can be effectively reduced for moderately rotating, fully convective stars. Using starspot distributions extrapolated from sunspot observations, we adopt typical M dwarf starspot distributions with low contrast spots to synthesise line profile distortions. The distortions are recovered using maximum entropy regularised fitting and the corresponding stellar radial velocities are measured. The procedure is demonstrated for a late-M star harbouring an orbiting planet in the habitable zone. The technique is effective for stars with vsini = 1-10 km/s, reducing the stellar noise contribution by factors of nearly an order of magnitude. With a carefully chosen observing strategy, the technique can be used to determine the stellar rotation period and is robust to uncertainties such as unknown stellar inclination. While demonstrated for late-type M stars, the procedure is applicable to all spectral types.
  • White dwarfs are compact stars, similar in size to Earth but ~200,000 times more massive. Isolated white dwarfs emit most of their power from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths, but when in close orbits with less dense stars, white dwarfs can strip material from their companions, and the resulting mass transfer can generate atomic line and X-ray emission, as well as near- and mid-infrared radiation if the white dwarf is magnetic. However, even in binaries, white dwarfs are rarely detected at far-infrared or radio frequencies. Here we report the discovery of a white dwarf / cool star binary that emits from X-ray to radio wavelengths. The star, AR Scorpii (henceforth AR Sco), was classified in the early 1970s as a delta-Scuti star, a common variety of periodic variable star. Our observations reveal instead a 3.56 hr period close binary, pulsing in brightness on a period of 1.97 min. The pulses are so intense that AR Sco's optical flux can increase by a factor of four within 30 s, and they are detectable at radio frequencies, the first such detection for any white dwarf system. They reflect the spin of a magnetic white dwarf which we find to be slowing down on a 10^7 yr timescale. The spin-down power is an order of magnitude larger than that seen in electromagnetic radiation, which, together with an absence of obvious signs of accretion, suggests that AR Sco is primarily spin-powered. Although the pulsations are driven by the white dwarf's spin, they originate in large part from the cool star. AR Sco's broad-band spectrum is characteristic of synchrotron radiation, requiring relativistic electrons. These must either originate from near the white dwarf or be generated in situ at the M star through direct interaction with the white dwarf's magnetosphere.
  • We have detected excess absorption in the emission cores of Ca II H & K during transits of HD 189733b for the first time. Using observations of three transits we investigate the origin of the absorption, which is also seen in H{\alpha} and the Na I D lines. Applying differential spectrophotometry methods to the Ca II H and Ca II K lines combined, using respective passband widths of $\Delta\lambda$ = 0.4 & 0.6 \AA\ yields excess absorption of t$_d$ = 0.0074 $\pm$ 0.0044 (1.7$\sigma$; Transit 1) and 0.0214 +/- 0.0022 (9.8$\sigma$; Transit 2). Similarly, we detect excess H{\alpha} absorption in a passband of width $\Delta\lambda$ = 0.7 \AA, with t$_d$ = 0.0084 $\pm$ 0.0016 (5.2$\sigma$) and 0.0121 $\pm$ 0.0012 (9.9$\sigma$). For both lines, Transit 2 is thus significantly deeper. Combining all three transits for the Na I D lines yields excess absorption of t$_d$ = 0.0041 $\pm$ 0.0006 (6.5$\sigma$). By considering the time series observations of each line, we find that the excess apparent absorption is best recovered in the stellar reference frame. These findings lead us to postulate that the main contribution to the excess transit absorption in the differential light curves arises because the normalising continuum bands form in the photosphere, whereas the line cores contain a chromospheric component. We can not rule out that part of the excess absorption signature arises from the planetary atmosphere, but we present evidence which casts doubt on recent claims to have detected wind motions in the planet's atmosphere in these data.
  • The results of a search for eclipsing Am star binaries using photometry from the SuperWASP survey are presented. The light curves of 1742 Am stars fainter than V = 8.0 were analysed for the presences of eclipses. A total of 70 stars were found to exhibit eclipses, with 66 having sufficient observations to enable orbital periods to be determined and 28 of which are newly identified eclipsing systems. Also presented are spectroscopic orbits for 5 of the systems. The number of systems and the period distribution is found to be consistent with that identified in previous radial velocity surveys of `classical' Am stars.
  • We have studied over 1600 Am stars at a photometric precision of 1 mmag with SuperWASP photometric data. Contrary to previous belief, we find that around 200 Am stars are pulsating delta Sct and gamma Dor stars, with low amplitudes that have been missed in previous, less extensive studies. While the amplitudes are generally low, the presence of pulsation in Am stars places a strong constraint on atmospheric convection, and may require the pulsation to be laminar. While some pulsating Am stars have been previously found to be delta Sct stars, the vast majority of Am stars known to pulsate are presented in this paper. They will form the basis of future statistical studies of pulsation in the presence of atomic diffusion.
  • We present detailed parameter determinations of two chemically normal late A-type stars, HD 32115 and HD 37594, to uncover the reasons behind large discrepancies between two previous analyses of these stars performed with a semi-automatic procedure and a "classical" analysis. Our study is based on high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra obtained at the McDonald Observatory. Our method is based on the simultaneous use of all available observables: multicolor photometry, pressure-sensitive magnesium lines, metallic lines and Balmer line profiles. Our final set of fundamental parameters fits, within the error bars, all available observables. It differs from the published results obtained with a semi-automatic procedure. A direct comparison between our new observational material and the spectra previously used by other authors shows that the quality of the data is not the origin of the discrepancies. As the two stars require a substantial macroturbulence velocity to fit the line profiles, we concluded that neglecting this additional broadening in the semi-automatic analysis is one origin of discrepancy. The use of FeI excitation equilibrium and of the Fe ionisation equilibrium, to derive effective temperature and surface gravity, respectively, neglecting all other indicators leads to a systematically erroneously high effective temperature. We deduce that the results obtained using only one parameter indicator might be biased and that those results need to be cautiously taken when performing further detailed analyses, such as modelling of the asteroseismic frequencies or characterising transiting exoplanets.
  • We present light curves and periods of 53 candidates for short period eclipsing binary stars identified by SuperWASP. These include 48 newly identified objects with periods <2x10^4 seconds (~0.23d), as well as the shortest period binary known with main sequence components (GSC2314-0530 = 1SWASP J022050.85+332047.6) and four other previously known W UMa stars (although the previously reported periods for two of these four are shown to be incorrect). The period distribution of main sequence contact binaries shows a sharp cut-off at a lower limit of around 0.22d, but until now, very few systems were known close to this limit. These new candidates will therefore be important for understanding the evolution of low mass stars and to allow investigation of the cause of the period cut-off.
  • We report the discovery of WASP-21b, a new transiting exoplanet discovered by the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) Consortium and established and characterized with the FIES, SOPHIE, CORALIE and HARPS fiber-fed echelle spectrographs. A 4.3-d period, 1.1% transit depth and 3.4-h duration are derived for WASP-21b using SuperWASP-North and high precision photometric observations at the Liverpool Telescope. Simultaneous fitting to the photometric and radial velocity data with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure leads to a planet in the mass regime of Saturn. With a radius of 1.07 R_Jup and mass of 0.30 M_Jup, WASP-21b has a density close to 0.24 rho_Jup corresponding to the distribution peak at low density of transiting gaseous giant planets. With a host star metallicity [Fe/H] of -0.46, WASP-21b strengthens the correlation between planetary density and host star metallicity for the five known Saturn-like transiting planets. Furthermore there are clear indications that WASP-21b is the first transiting planet belonging to the thick disc.
  • We report on the discovery of a new extremely short period transiting extrasolar planet, WASP-19b. The planet has mass Mpl = 1.15 \pm 0.08 MJ, radius Rpl = 1.31 \pm 0.06 RJ, and orbital period P = 0.7888399 \pm 0.0000008 days. Through spectroscopic analysis, we determine the host star to be a slightly super-solar metallicity ([M/H] = 0.1 \pm 0.1 dex) G-dwarf with Teff = 5500 \pm 100 K. In addition, we detect periodic, sinusoidal flux variations in the light curve which are used to derive a rotation period for the star of Prot = 10.5 \pm 0.2 days. The relatively short stellar rotation period suggests that either WASP-19 is somewhat young (~ 600 Myr old) or tidal interactions between the two bodies have caused the planet to spiral inward over its lifetime resulting in the spin-up of the star. Due to the detection of the rotation period, this system has the potential to place strong constraints on the stellar tidal quality factor, Q's, if a more precise age is determined.
  • We report the discovery of WASP-13b, a low-mass $ M_p = 0.46 ^{+ 0.06}_{- 0.05} M_J$ transiting exoplanet with an orbital period of $4.35298 \pm 0.00004$ days. The transit has a depth of 9 mmag, and although our follow-up photometry does not allow us to constrain the impact parameter well ($0 < b < 0.46$), with radius in the range $R_p \sim 1.06 - 1.21 R_J$ the location of WASP-13b in the mass-radius plane is nevertheless consistent with H/He-dominated, irradiated, low core mass and core-free theoretical models. The G1V host star is similar to the Sun in mass (M$_{*} = 1.03^{+0.11}_ {- 0.09} M_{\odot}$) and metallicity ([M/H]=$0.0\pm0.2$), but is possibly older ($8.5^{+ 5.5}_{- 4.9}$ Gyr).
  • We report the discovery of WASP-10b, a new transiting extrasolar planet (ESP) discovered by the WASP Consortium and confirmed using NOT FIES and SOPHIE radial velocity data. A 3.09 day period, 29 mmag transit depth, and 2.36 hour duration are derived for WASP-10b using WASP and high precision photometric observations. Simultaneous fitting to the photometric and radial velocity data using a Markov-chain Monte Carlo procedure leads to a planet radius of 1.28R_J, a mass of 2.96M_J and eccentricity of ~0.06. WASP-10b is one of the more massive transiting ESPs, and we compare its characteristics to the current sample of transiting ESP, where there is currently little information for masses greater than ~2M_J and non-zero eccentricities. WASP-10's host star, GSC 2752-00114 (USNO-B1.0 1214-0586164) is among the fainter stars in the WASP sample, with V=12.7 and a spectral type of K5. This result shows promise for future late-type dwarf star surveys.
  • We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey and the brightest transiting-exoplanet system in the Southern hemisphere. WASP-7b is among the densest of the known Jupiter-mass planets, suggesting that it has a massive core. The planet mass is 0.96 M_Jup, the radius 0.915 R_Jup, and the density 1.26 rho_Jup.
  • We report the discovery of WASP-4b, a large transiting gas-giant planet with an orbital period of 1.34 days. This is the first planet to be discovered by the SuperWASP-South observatory and CORALIE collaboration and the first planet orbiting a star brighter than 16th magnitude to be discovered in the Southern hemisphere. A simultaneous fit to high-quality lightcurves and precision radial-velocity measurements leads to a planetary mass of 1.22 +/- 0.1 MJup and a planetary radius of 1.42 +/- 0.08 RJup. The host star is USNO-B1.0 0479-0948995, a G7V star of visual magnitude 12.5. As a result of the short orbital period, the predicted surface temperature of the planet is 1776 K, making it an ideal candidate for detections of the secondary eclipse at infrared wavelengths.
  • The Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) survey currently operates two installations, designated SuperWASP-N and SuperWASP-S, located in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. These installations are designed to provide high time-resolution photometry for the purpose of detecting transiting extra-solar planets, asteroids, and transient events. Here we present results from a transit-hunting observing campaign using SuperWASP-N covering a right ascension range of 06hr < RA < 16hr. This paper represents the fifth and final in the series of transit candidates released from the 2004 observing season. In total, 729,335 stars from 33 fields were monitored with 130,566 having sufficient precision to be scanned for transit signatures. Using a robust transit detection algorithm and selection criteria, 6 stars were found to have events consistent with the signature of a transiting extra-solar planet based upon the photometry, including the known transiting planet XO-1b. These transit candidates are presented here along with discussion of follow-up observations and the expected number of candidates in relation to the overall observing strategy.
  • We report the discovery of WASP-3b, the third transiting exoplanet to be discovered by the WASP and SOPHIE collaboration. WASP-3b transits its host star USNO-B1.0 1256-0285133 every 1.846834+-0.000002 days. Our high precision radial-velocity measurements present a variation with amplitude characteristic of a planetary-mass companion and in-phase with the light-curve. Adaptive optics imaging shows no evidence for nearby stellar companions, and line-bisector analysis excludes faint, unresolved binarity and stellar activity as the cause of the radial-velocity variations. We make a preliminary spectroscopic analysis of the host star finding it to have Teff = 6400+-100 K and log g = 4.25+-0.05 which suggests it is most likely an unevolved main sequence star of spectral type F7-8V. Our simultaneous modelling of the transit photometry and reflex motion of the host leads us to derive a mass of 1.76 +0.08 -0.14 M_J and radius 1.31 +0.07-0.14 R_J for WASP-3b. The proximity and relative temperature of the host star suggests that WASP-3b is one of the hottest exoplanets known, and thus has the potential to place stringent constraints on exoplanet atmospheric models.
  • Transiting extrasolar planets constitute only a small fraction of the range of stellar systems found to display periodic, shallow dimmings in wide-field surveys employing small-aperture camera arrays. Here we present an efficient selection strategy for follow-up observations, derived from analysis of the light curves of a sample of 67 SuperWASP targets that passed the selection tests we used in earlier papers, but which have subsequently been identified either as planet hosts or as astrophysical false positives. We determine the system parameters using Markov-chain Monte Carlo analysis of the SuperWASP light curves. We use a constrained optimisation of chi-squared combined with a Bayesian prior based on the main-sequence mass and radius expected from the 2MASS J-H colour. The Bayesian nature of the analysis allows us to quantify both the departure of the host star from the main-sequence mass-radius relation and the probability that the companion radius is less than 1.5 Jupiter radii. When augmented by direct light curve analyses that detect binaries with unequal primary and secondary eclipses, and objects with aperture blends that are resolved by SuperWASP, we find that only 13 of the original 67 stars, including the three known planets in the sample, would qualify for follow-up. This suggests that planet discovery "hit rates" better than one-in-five should be achievable. In addition, the stellar binaries that qualify are likely to have astrophysically interesting stellar or sub-stellar secondaries.
  • We present XMM observations of the black hole X-ray nova V404 Cygni in quiescence. Its quiescent spectrum can be best fitted by a simple power-law with slope 2. The spectra are consistent with that expected for the advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF). V404 Cyg was roughly equal in luminosity compared to the previous observation of Chandra. We see variability of a factor of 4 during the observation. We find no evidence for the presence of fluorescent or H-like/He-like iron emission, with upper limits of 52 eV and 110 eV respectively. The limit on the fluorescent emission is improved by a factor of 15 over the previous estimate, and the restriction on H-like/He-like emission is lower than predicted from models by a factor of roughly 2.
  • The SuperWASP-I instrument observed 6.7 million stars between 8-15 mag from La Palma during the 2004 May-September season. Our transit-hunting algorithm selected 11,626 objects from the 184,442 stars within the range RA 18hr-21hr. We describe our thorough selection procedure whereby catalogue information is exploited along with careful study of the SuperWASP data to filter out, as far as possible, transit mimics. We have identified 35 candidates which we recommend for follow-up observations.
  • We present optical lightcurves of 428 periodic variable stars coincident with ROSAT X-ray sources, detected using the first run of the SuperWASP photometric survey. Only 68 of these were previously recognised as periodic variables. A further 30 of these objects are previously known pre-main sequence stars, for which we detect a modulation period for the first time. Amongst the newly identified periodic variables, many appear to be close eclipsing binaries, their X-ray emission is presumably the result of RS CVn type behaviour. Others are probably BY Dra stars, pre-main sequence stars and other rapid rotators displaying enhanced coronal activity. A number of previously catalogued pulsating variables (RR Lyr stars and Cepheids) coincident with X-ray sources are also seen, but we show that these are likely to be misclassifications. We identify four objects which are probable low mass eclipsing binary stars, based on their very red colour and light curve morphology.
  • We have detected low-amplitude radial-velocity variations in two stars, USNO-B1.0 1219-0005465 (GSC 02265-00107 = WASP-1) and USNO-B1.0 0964-0543604 (GSC 00522-01199 = WASP-2). Both stars were identified as being likely host stars of transiting exoplanets in the 2004 SuperWASP wide-field transit survey. Using the newly-commissioned radial-velocity spectrograph SOPHIE at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, we found that both objects exhibit reflex orbital radial-velocity variations with amplitudes characteristic of planetary-mass companions and in-phase with the photometric orbits. Line-bisector studies rule out faint blended binaries as the cause of either the radial-velocity variations or the transits. We perform preliminary spectral analyses of the host stars, which together with their radial-velocity variations and fits to the transit light curves, yield estimates of the planetary masses and radii. WASP-1b and WASP-2b have orbital periods of 2.52 and 2.15 days respectively. Given mass estimates for their F7V and K1V primaries we derive planet masses 0.80 to 0.98 and 0.81 to 0.95 times that of Jupiter respectively. WASP-1b appears to have an inflated radius of at least 1.33 R_Jup, whereas WASP-2b has a radius in the range 0.65 to 1.26 R_Jup.
  • The SuperWASP Cameras are wide-field imaging systems sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands, and the Sutherland Station of the South African Astronomical Observatory. Each instrument has a field of view of some ~482 square degrees with an angular scale of 13.7 arcsec per pixel, and is capable of delivering photometry with accuracy better than 1% for objects having V ~ 7.0 - 11.5. Lower quality data for objects brighter than V ~15.0 are stored in the project archive. The systems, while designed to monitor fields with high cadence, are capable of surveying the entire visible sky every 40 minutes. Depending on the observational strategy, the data rate can be up to 100GB per night. We have produced a robust, largely automatic reduction pipeline and advanced archive which are used to serve the data products to the consortium members. The main science aim of these systems is to search for bright transiting exo-planets systems suitable for spectroscopic followup observations. The first 6 month season of SuperWASP-North observations produced lightcurves of ~6.7 million objects with 12.9 billion data points.
  • Photometric transit surveys promise to complement the currently known sample of extra-solar planets by providing additional information on the planets and especially their radii. Here we present extra-solar planet (ESP) candidates from one such survey called, the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) obtained with the SuperWASP wide-field imaging system. Observations were taken with SuperWASP-North located in La Palma during the April to October 2004 observing season. The data cover fields between 23hr and 03hr in RA at declinations above +12. This amounts to over $\approx$400,000 stars with V magnitudes 8 to 13.5. For the stars brighter than 12.5, we achieve better than 1 percent photometric precision. Here we present 41 sources with low amplitude variability between $\approx$ 1 and 10 mmag, from which we select 12 with periods between 1.2 and 4.4 days as the most promising extrasolar planet candidates. We discuss the properties of these ESP candidates, the expected fraction of transits recovered for our sample, and implications for the frequency and detection of hot-Jupiters.
  • The low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) associated with the M31 globular cluster Bo 158 is known to exhibit intensity dips on a ~2.78 hr period. This is due to obscuration of the X-ray source on the orbital period by material on the outer edge of the accretion disc. However, the depth of dipping varied from <10% to \~83% in three archival XMM-Newton observations of Bo 158. Previous work suggested that the dip depth was anticorrelated with the X-ray luminosity. However, we present results from three new XMM-Newton observations that suggest that the evolution of dipping is instead due to precession of the accretion disc. Such precession is expected in neutron star LMXBs with mass ratios <0.3 (i.e. with orbital periods <4 hr), such as the Galactic dipping LMXB 4U 1916-053. We simulated the accretion disc of Bo 158 using cutting-edge 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), and using the observed parameters. Our results show disc variability on two time-scales. The disc precesses in a prograde direction on a period of 81+/-3 hr. Also, a radiatively-driven disc warp is present in the inner disc, which undergoes retrograde precesson on a \~31 hr period. From the system geometry, we conclude that the dipping evolution is driven by the disc precession. Hence we predict that the dipping behaviour repeats on a ~81 hr cycle.