• We present a detailed analysis of the specific star formation rate -- stellar mass ($\mathrm{sSFR}-M_*$) of $z\le 0.13$ disk central galaxies using a morphologically selected mass-complete sample ($M_* \ge 10^{9.5} M_{\odot}$). Considering samples of grouped and ungrouped galaxies, we find the $\mathrm{sSFR}-M_*$ relations of disk-dominated central galaxies to have no detectable dependence on host dark-matter halo (DMH) mass, even where weak-lensing measurements indicate a difference in halo mass of a factor $\gtrsim5$. We further detect a gradual evolution of the $\mathrm{sSFR}-M_*$ relation of non-grouped (field) central disk galaxies with redshift, even over a $\Delta z \approx 0.04$ ($\approx5\cdot10^{8}\mathrm{yr}$) interval, while the scatter remains constant. This evolution is consistent with extrapolation of the "main-sequence-of-star-forming-galaxies" from previous literature that uses larger redshift baselines and coarser sampling. Taken together, our results present new constraints on the paradigm under which the SFR of galaxies is determined by a self-regulated balance between gas inflows and outflows, and consumption of gas by star-formation in disks, with the inflow being determined by the product of the cosmological accretion rate and a fuelling-efficiency -- $\dot{M}_{\mathrm{b,halo}}\zeta$. In particular, maintaining the paradigm requires $\dot{M}_{\mathrm{b,halo}}\zeta$ to be independent of the mass $M_{\mathrm{halo}}$ of the host DMH. Furthermore, it requires the fuelling-efficiency $\zeta$ to have a strong redshift dependence ($\propto (1+z)^{2.7}$ for $M_*=10^{10.3} M_{\odot}$ over $z=0 - 0.13$), even though no morphological transformation to spheroids can be invoked to explain this in our disk-dominated sample. The physical mechanisms capable of giving rise to such dependencies of $\zeta$ on $M_{\mathrm{halo}}$ and $z$ for disks are unclear.
  • We present an analysis of the mid-infrared WISE sources seen within the equatorial GAMA G12 field, located in the North Galactic Cap. Our motivation is to study and characterize the behavior of WISE source populations in anticipation of the deep multi-wavelength surveys that will define the next decade, with the principal science goal of mapping the 3D large scale structures and determining the global physical attributes of the host galaxies. In combination with cosmological redshifts, we identify galaxies from their WISE W1 3.4um resolved emission, and by performing a star-galaxy separation using apparent magnitude, colors and statistical modeling of star-counts. The resultant galaxy catalog has ~590,000 sources in 60 deg^2, reaching a W1 5-sigma depth of 31 uJy. At the faint end, where redshifts are not available, we employ a luminosity function analysis to show that approximately 27% of all WISE extragalactic sources to a limit of 17.5 mag (31 uJy) are at high redshift, z > 1. The spatial distribution is investigated using two-point correlation functions and a 3D source density characterization at 5 Mpc and 20 Mpc scales. For angular distributions, we find brighter and more massive sources are strongly clustered relative to fainter and lower mass source; likewise, based on WISE colors, spheroidal galaxies have the strongest clustering, while late-type disk galaxies have the lowest clustering amplitudes. Along the radial direction, the strongest clustering is in the largest redshift shell, while the weakest is in the nearest redshift shell, consistent with the stellar mass and morphological type dependency results. In three dimensions, we find a number of distinct groupings, often bridged by filaments and super-structures. Using special visualization tools, we map these structures, exploring how clustering may play a role with stellar mass and galaxy type.
  • Abridged - We quantify the effect of the galaxy group environment (for 12.5 < log(M_group/Msun) < 14.0) on the star formation rates of the (morphologically-selected) population of disk-dominated local Universe spiral galaxies (z < 0.13) with stellar masses log(M*/Msun) > 9.5. Within this population, we find that, while a small minority of group satellites are strongly quenched, the group centrals, and the large majority of satellites exhibit levels of SFR indistinguishable from ungrouped "field" galaxies of the same M*, albeit with a higher scatter, and for all M*. Modelling these results, we deduce that disk-dominated satellites continue to be characterized by a rapid cycling of gas into and out of their ISM at rates similar to those operating prior to infall, with the on-going fuelling likely sourced from the group intrahalo medium (IHM) on Mpc scales, rather than from the circum-galactic medium on 100kpc scales. Consequently, the color-density relation of the galaxy population as a whole would appear to be primarily due to a change in the mix of disk- and spheroid-dominated morphologies in the denser group environment compared to the field, rather than to a reduced propensity of the IHM in higher mass structures to cool and accrete onto galaxies. We also suggest that the inferred substantial accretion of IHM gas by satellite disk-dominated galaxies will lead to a progressive reduction in their specific angular momentum, thereby representing an efficient secular mechanism to transform morphology from star-forming disk-dominated types to more passive spheroid-dominated types.
  • We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalisation, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric dataset from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the datasets. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR dataset. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey furnishes a deep redshift catalog that, when combined with the Wide-field Infrared Explorer ($WISE$), allows us to explore for the first time the mid-infrared properties of $> 110, 000$ galaxies over 120 deg$^2$ to $z\simeq 0.5$. In this paper we detail the procedure for producing the matched GAMA-$WISE$ catalog for the G12 and G15 fields, in particular characterising and measuring resolved sources; the complete catalogs for all three GAMA equatorial fields will be made available through the GAMA public releases. The wealth of multiwavelength photometry and optical spectroscopy allows us to explore empirical relations between optically determined stellar mass (derived from synthetic stellar population models) and 3.4micron and 4.6micron WISE measurements. Similarly dust-corrected Halpha-derived star formation rates can be compared to 12micron and 22micron luminosities to quantify correlations that can be applied to large samples to $z<0.5$. To illustrate the applications of these relations, we use the 12micron star formation prescription to investigate the behavior of specific star formation within the GAMA-WISE sample and underscore the ability of WISE to detect star-forming systems at $z\sim0.5$. Within galaxy groups (determined by a sophisticated friends-of-friends scheme), results suggest that galaxies with a neighbor within 100$\,h^{-1} $kpc have, on average, lower specific star formation rates than typical GAMA galaxies with the same stellar mass.
  • We provide and describe a library of diffuse stellar radiation fields in spiral galaxies derived using calculations of the transfer of stellar radiation from the main morphological components - disks, thin disks, and bulges - through the dusty interstellar medium. These radiation fields are self-consistent with the solutions for the integrated panchromatic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) previously presented using the same model. Because of this, observables calculated from the radiation fields, such as gamma-ray or radio emission, can be self-consistently combined with the solutions for the ultraviolet/optical/submillimeter SEDs, thus expanding the range of applicability of the radiation transfer model to a broader range of wavelengths and physical quantities. We also give analytic solutions for radiation fields in optically thin stellar disks, in stellar disks with one dust disk and in stellar disks with two dust disks. The analytic solutions for the direct light are exact and can be used as benchmarks. The analytic solutions with scattering are only approximate, becoming exact only in the extreme optically thick limit. We find strongly contrasting solutions for the spatial distribution of the radiation fields for disks, thin disks and bulges. For bulges we find a strong dependence of the radiation fields on Sersic index.
  • We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, \tau^f_B, and the stellar mass surface density, \mu_{*}, of nearby (z < 0.13) spiral galaxies: log(\tau^f_B) = 1.12(+-0.11)log(\mu_{*}/M_sol kpc^2)-8.6(+-0.8). This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey and detected in the FIR/submm in the Herschel-ATLAS survey. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to \mu_{*} we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and S'ersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships between stellar mass, metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the \tau^f_B-\mu_{*} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the ISM. We use the \tau^f_B-\mu_{*} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu & Tuffs (2011) to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (sSFR), stellar mass, and \mu_{*}, in which the attenuation of the UV light used to measure the SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which is demonstrably due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar radiation field.
  • We investigate the properties of satellite galaxies that surround isolated hosts within the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.15, using data taken as part of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. Making use of isolation and satellite criteria that take into account stellar mass estimates, we find 3514 isolated galaxies of which 1426 host a total of 2998 satellites. Separating the red and blue populations of satellites and hosts, using colour-mass diagrams, we investigate the radial distribution of satellite galaxies and determine how the red fraction of satellites varies as a function of satellite mass, host mass and the projected distance from their host. Comparing the red fraction of satellites to a control sample of small neighbours at greater projected radii, we show that the increase in red fraction is primarily a function of host mass. The satellite red fraction is about 0.2 higher than the control sample for hosts with 11.0 < log M_* < 11.5, while the red fractions show no difference for hosts with 10.0 < log M_* < 10.5. For the satellites of more massive hosts the red fraction also increases as a function of decreasing projected distance. Our results suggest that the likely main mechanism for the quenching of star formation in satellites hosted by isolated galaxies is strangulation.
  • We investigate the ultraviolet and optical properties and environment of low redshift galaxies detected in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) science demonstration data. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey seventh release and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly database to select galaxies with r_Petro < 19.0 mag in the redshift range 0.02 < z < 0.2 and look for their submillimeter counterparts in H-ATLAS. Our results show that at low redshift, H-ATLAS detects mainly blue/star-forming galaxies with a minor contribution from red systems which are highly obscured by dust. In addition we find that the colour of a galaxy rather than the local density of its environment determines whether it is detectable by H-ATLAS. The average dust temperature of galaxies that are simultaneously detected by both PACS and SPIRE is 25K \pm 4K, independent of environment. This analysis provides a glimpse of the potential of the H-ATLAS data to investigate the submillimeter properties of galaxies in the local universe.
  • Using the complete GAMA-I survey covering ~142 sq. deg. to r=19.4, of which ~47 sq. deg. is to r=19.8, we create the GAMA-I galaxy group catalogue (G3Cv1), generated using a friends-of-friends (FoF) based grouping algorithm. Our algorithm has been tested extensively on one family of mock GAMA lightcones, constructed from Lambda-CDM N-body simulations populated with semi-analytic galaxies. Recovered group properties are robust to the effects of interlopers and are median unbiased in the most important respects. G3Cv1 contains 14,388 galaxy groups (with multiplicity >= 2$), including 44,186 galaxies out of a possible 110,192 galaxies, implying ~40% of all galaxies are assigned to a group. The similarities of the mock group catalogues and G3Cv1 are multiple: global characteristics are in general well recovered. However, we do find a noticeable deficit in the number of high multiplicity groups in GAMA compared to the mocks. Additionally, despite exceptionally good local spatial completeness, G3Cv1 contains significantly fewer compact groups with 5 or more members, this effect becoming most evident for high multiplicity systems. These two differences are most likely due to limitations in the physics included of the current GAMA lightcone mock. Further studies using a variety of galaxy formation models are required to confirm their exact origin.
  • We present an analysis of the properties of the lowest Halpha-luminosity galaxies (L_Halpha<4x10^32 W; SFR<0.02 Msun/yr) in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These galaxies make up the the rise above a Schechter function in the number density of systems seen at the faint end of the Halpha luminosity function. Above our flux limit we find that these galaxies are principally composed of intrinsically low stellar mass systems (median stellar mass =2.5x10^8 Msun) with only 5/90 having stellar masses M>10^10 Msun. The low SFR systems are found to exist predominantly in the lowest density environments (median density ~0.02 galaxy Mpc^-2 with none in environments more dense than ~1.5 galaxy Mpc^-2). Their current specific star formation rates (SSFR; -8.5 < log(SSFR[yr^-1])<-12.) are consistent with their having had a variety of star formation histories. The low density environments of these galaxies demonstrates that such low-mass, star-forming systems can only remain as low-mass and forming stars if they reside sufficiently far from other galaxies to avoid being accreted, dispersed through tidal effects or having their gas reservoirs rendered ineffective through external processes.
  • A heuristic greedy algorithm is developed for efficiently tiling spatially dense redshift surveys. In its first application to the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) redshift survey we find it rapidly improves the spatial uniformity of our data, and naturally corrects for any spatial bias introduced by the 2dF multi object spectrograph. We make conservative predictions for the final state of the GAMA redshift survey after our final allocation of time, and can be confident that even if worse than typical weather affects our observations, all of our main survey requirements will be met.
  • Recent far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) observations of the nearby galaxy NGC4625 made by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) show the presence of an extended UV disk reaching 4 times the optical radius of the galaxy. The UV-to-optical colors suggest that the bulk of the stars in the disk of NGC4625 are currently being formed, providing a unique opportunity to study today the physics of star formation under conditions similar to those when the normal disks of spiral galaxies like the Milky Way first formed. In the case of NGC4625, the star formation in the extended disk is likely to be triggered by interaction with NGC4618 and possibly also with the newly discovered galaxy NGC4625A. The positions of the FUV complexes in the extended disk coincide with peaks in the H I distribution. The masses of these complexes are in the range 10^3-10^4 Msun with their Halpha emission (when present) being dominated by ionization from single stars.
  • The total ultraviolet (UV) flux (from 1412 to 2718 AA) of M 101 is compared on a pixel-to-pixel basis with the total far-infrared (FIR) flux (from 60 to 170 micron), using the maps of the galaxy taken by GALEX in the near-UV and far-UV and by ISOPHOT at 60, 100 and 170 micron. The main result of this investigation is the discovery of a tight dependence of the FIR/UV ratio on radius, with values monotonically decreasing from around 4 in the nuclear region to nearly zero towards the edge of the optical disk. Although the tightness of this dependence is in part attributable to resolution effects, the result is consistent with the presence of a large-scale distribution of diffuse dust having a face-on optical depth which decreases with radius and which dominates over the more localized variations in opacity between the arm and interarm regions. We also find a trend for the FIR/UV ratio to take on higher values in the regions of diffuse interarm emission than in the spiral-arm regions, at a given radius. This is interpreted quantitatively in terms of the escape probability of UV photons from spiral arms and their subsequent scattering in the interarm regions, and in terms of the larger relative contribution of optical photons to the heating of the dust in the interarm regions.
  • Using tools previously described and applied to the prototype galaxy NGC 891, we model the optical to far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SED) of four additional edge-on spiral galaxies, namely NGC 5907, NGC 4013, UGC 1082 and UGC 2048. Comparing the model predictions with IRAS and, where available, sub-millimeter and millimeter observations, we determine the respective roles of the old and young stellar populations in grain heating. In all cases, the young population dominates, with the contribution of the old stellar population being at most 40%, as previously found for NGC 891. After normalization to the disk area, the massive star-formation rate (SFR) derived using our SED modeling technique, which is primarily sensitive to the non-ionizing ultraviolet output from the young stellar population, lies in the range 7e-4 - 2e-2 M_sun * yr^-1 * kpc^-2. This is consistent with normalized SFRs derived for face-on galaxies of comparable surface gas densities from H_alpha observations. Though the most active star-forming galaxy of the five in absolute terms, NGC 891 is not an exceptional system in terms of its surface density in SFR.