• We study the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) in InAs/ GaSb and InAs quantum wells. We show through temperature- and gate-dependent magnetotransport measurements of weak antilocalization that the dominant spin-orbit relaxation mechanism in our low-mobility heterostructures is Elliott-Yafet and not Dyakonov-Perel in the form of the Rashba or Dresselhaus SOI as previously suggested. We compare our findings with recent work on this material system and show that the SOI length lies within the same range. The SOI length may be controlled using an electrostatic gate, opening up prospects for developing spintronic applications.
  • Chemically ordered B2 FeRh exhibits a remarkable antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic phase transition that is first order. It thus shows phase coexistence, usually by proceeding though nucleation at random defect sites followed by propagation of phase boundary domain walls. The transition occurs at a temperature that can be varied by doping other metals onto the Rh site. We have taken advantage of this to yield control over the transition process by preparing an epilayer with oppositely directed doping gradients of Pd and Ir throughout its height, yielding a gradual transition that occurs between 350~K and 500~K. As the sample is heated, a horizontal antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic phase boundary domain wall moves gradually up through the layer, its position controlled by the temperature. This mobile magnetic domain wall affects the magnetisation and resistivity of the layer in a way that can be controlled, and hence exploited, for novel device applications.
  • The field of spin electronics (spintronics) was initiated by the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) for which Fert[1] and Grunberg[2] were awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physics. GMR arises from differential scattering of the majority and minority spin electrons by a ferromagnet (FM) so that the resistance when the FM layers separated by non-magnetic (NM) spacers are aligned by an applied field is different to when they are antiparallel. In 1996 Slonczewski[3] and Berger[4] predicted that a large spin-polarised current could transfer spin-angular momentum and so exert a spin transfer torque (STT) sufficient to switch thin FM layers between stable magnetisation states[5] and, for even higher current densities, drive continuous precession which emits microwaves[6]. Thus, while GMR is a purely passive phenomenon which ultimately depends on the intrinsic band structure of the FM, STT adds an active element to spintronics by which the direction of the magnetisation may be manipulated. Here we show that highly non-equilibrium spin injection can modify the scattering asymmetry and, by extension, the intrinsic magnetism of a FM. This phenomenon is completely different to STT and provides a third ingredient which should further expand the range of opportunities for the application of spintronics.
  • We report on the structural, magnetic, and electron transport properties of a L1o-ordered epitaxial iron-platinum alloy layer fabricated by magnetron-sputtering on a MgO(001) substrate. The film studied displayed a long range chemical order parameter of S~0.90, and hence has a very strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. In the diffusive electron transport regime, for temperatures ranging from 2 K to 258 K, we found hysteresis in the magnetoresistance mainly due to electron scattering from magnetic domain walls. At 2 K, we observed an overall domain wall magnetoresistance of about 0.5 %. By evaluating the spin current asymmetry alpha = sigma_up / sigma_down, we were able to estimate the diffusive spin current polarization. At all temperatures ranging from 2 K to 258 K, we found a diffusive spin current polarization of > 80%. To study the ballistic transport regime, we have performed point-contact Andreev-reflection measurements at 4.2 K. We obtained a value for the ballistic current spin polarization of ~42% (which compares very well with that of a polycrystalline thin film of elemental Fe). We attribute the discrepancy to a difference in the characteristic scattering times for oppositely spin-polarized electrons, such scattering times influencing the diffusive but not the ballistic current spin polarization.
  • The properties of the archetypal Co/Cu giant magnetoresistance (GMR) spin-valve structure have been modified by the insertion of very thin (sub-monolayer) $\delta$-layers of various elements at different points within the Co layers, and at the Co/Cu interface. Different effects are observed depending on the nature of the impurity, its position within the periodic table, and its location within the spin-valve. The GMR can be strongly enhanced or suppressed for various specific combinations of these parameters, giving insight into the microscopic mechanisms giving rise to the GMR.
  • We use nanometer-sized point contacts to a Co/Cu spin valve to study the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) of only a few Co domains. The measured data show strong device-to-device differences of the GMR curve, which we attribute to the absence of averaging over many domains. The GMR ratio decreases with increasing bias current. For one particular device, this is accompanied by the development of two distinct GMR plateaus, the plateau level depending on bias polarity and sweep direction of the magnetic field. We attribute the observed behavior to current-induced changes of the magnetization, involving spin transfer due to incoherent emission of magnons and self-field effects.
  • The in-plane correlation lengths and magnetic disorder of magnetic domains in a transition metal multilayer have been studied using neutron scattering techniques. A new theoretical framework is presented connecting the observed scattering to the in-plane correlation length and the dispersion of the local magnetization vector about the mean macroscopic direction. The results unambiguously show the highly correlated nature of the antiferromagnetically coupled domain structure vertically throughout the multilayer. We are easily able to relate the neutron determined magnetic dispersion and domain correlations to magnetization and magnetotransport experiments.