• We present a systematic study of core-shell Au/Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles produced by thermal decomposition under mild conditions. The morphology and crystal structure of the nanoparticles revealed the presence of Au core of <d> = (6.9\pm 1.0) nm surrounded by Fe_3O_4 shell with a thickness of ~3.5 nm, epitaxially grown onto the Au core surface. The Au/Fe_3O_4 core-shell structure was demonstrated by high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. The magnetite shell grown on top of the Au nanoparticle displayed a thermal blocking state at temperatures below T_B = 59 K and a relaxed state well above T_B. Remarkably, an exchange bias effect was observed when cooling down the samples below room temperature under an external magnetic field. Moreover, the exchange bias field (H_{EX}) started to appear at T~40 K and its value increased by decreasing the temperature. This effect has been assigned to the interaction of spins located in the magnetically disordered regions (in the inner and outer surface of the Fe_3O_4 shell) and spins located in the ordered region of the Fe_3O_4 shell.
  • Low dimensionality, broken symmetry and easily-modulated carrier concentrations provoke novel electronic phase emergence at oxide interfaces. However, the spatial extent of such reconstructions - i.e. the interfacial "depth" - remains unclear. Examining LaAlO$_3$/SrTiO$_3$ heterostructures at previously unexplored carrier densities $n_{2D}\geq6.9\times10^{14}$ cm$^{-2}$, we observe a Shubnikov-de Haas effect for small in-plane fields, characteristic of an anisotropic 3D Fermi surface with preferential $d_{xz,yz}$ orbital occupancy extending over at least 100~nm perpendicular to the interface. Quantum oscillations from the 3D Fermi surface of bulk doped SrTiO$_3$ emerge simultaneously at higher $n_{2D}$. We distinguish three areas in doped perovskite heterostructures: narrow ($<20$ nm) 2D interfaces housing superconductivity and/or other emergent phases, electronically isotropic regions far ($>120$ nm) from the interface and new intermediate zones where interfacial proximity renormalises the electronic structure relative to the bulk.
  • A hysteretic in-plane magnetoresistance develops below the superconducting transition of LaAlO$_3$/SrTiO$_3$ interfaces for $\left|H_{/\!/}\right|<$ 0.15 T, independently of the carrier density or oxygen annealing. We show that this hysteresis arises from vortex depinning within a thin superconducting layer, in which the vortices are created by discrete ferromagnetic dipoles located solely above the layer. We find no evidence for finite-momentum pairing or bulk magnetism and hence conclude that ferromagnetism is strictly confined to the interface, where it competes with superconductivity.
  • We have studied how the magnetic properties of oxygen-deficient EuO sputtered thin films vary as a function of thickness. The magnetic moment, measured by polarized neutron reflectometry, and the Curie temperature are found to decrease with reducing thickness. Our results indicate that the reduced number of nearest neighbors, band bending and the partial depopulation of the electronic states that carry the spins associated with the 4f orbitals of Eu are all contributing factors in the surface-induced change of the magnetic properties of EuO$_{1-x}$.
  • We consider the effect of classical stochastic noise on control laser pulses used in a scheme for transferring quantum information between atoms, or quantum dots, in separate optical cavities via an optical connection between cavities. We develop a master equation for the dynamics of the system subject to stochastic errors in the laser pulses, and use this to evaluate the sensitivity of the transfer process to stochastic pulse shape errors for a number of different pulse shapes. We show that under certain conditions, the sensitivity of the transfer to the noise depends on the pulse shape, and develop a method for determining a pulse shape that is minimally sensitive to specific errors.
  • We present the first spintronic semiconductor field effect transistor. The injector and collector contacts of this device were made from magnetic permalloy thin films with different coercive fields so that they could be magnetized either parallel or antiparallel to each other in different applied magnetic fields. The conducting medium was a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed in an AlSb/InAs quantum well. Data from this device suggest that its resistance is controlled by two different types of spin-valve effect: the first occurring at the ferromagnet-2DEG interfaces; and the second occuring in direct propagation between contacts.
  • We have measured the low-temperature transport properties of a quantum dot formed in a one-dimensional channel. In zero magnetic field this device shows quantized ballistic conductance plateaus with resonant tunneling peaks in each transition region between plateaus. Studies of this structure as a function of applied perpendicular magnetic field and source-drain bias indicate that resonant structure deriving from tightly bound states is split by Coulomb charging at zero magnetic field.