• We report measurements on yttrium iron garnet (YIG) thin films grown on both gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) and yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) substrates, with and without thin Pt top layers. We provide three principal results: the observation of an interfacial region at the Pt/YIG interface, we place a limit on the induced magnetism of the Pt layer and confirm the existence of an interfacial layer at the GGG/YIG interface. Polarised neutron reflectometry (PNR) was used to give depth dependence of both the structure and magnetism of these structures. We find that a thin film of YIG on GGG is best described by three distinct layers: an interfacial layer near the GGG, around 5 nm thick and non-magnetic, a magnetic bulk phase, and a non-magnetic and compositionally distinct thin layer near the surface. We theorise that the bottom layer, which is independent of the film thickness, is caused by Gd diffusion. The top layer is likely to be extremely important in inverse spin Hall effect measurements, and is most likely Y2O3 or very similar. Magnetic sensitivity in the PNR to any induced moment in the Pt is increased by the existence of the Y2O3 layer; any moment is found to be less than 0.02 uB/atom.
  • Superconducting spintronics has emerged in the last decade as a promising new field that seeks to open a new dimension for nanoelectronics by utilizing the internal spin structure of the superconducting Cooper pair as a new degree of freedom. Its basic building blocks are spin-triplet Cooper pairs with equally aligned spins, which are promoted by proximity of a conventional superconductor to a ferromagnetic material with inhomogeneous macroscopic magnetization. Using low-energy muon spin rotation experiments, we find an entirely unexpected novel effect: the appearance of a magnetization in a thin layer of a non-magnetic metal (gold), separated from a ferromagnetic double layer by a 50 nm thick superconducting layer of Nb. The effect can be controlled by either temperature or by using a magnetic field to control the state of the remote ferromagnetic elements and may act as a basic building block for a new generation of quantum interference devices based on the spin of a Cooper pair.
  • Chemically ordered B2 FeRh exhibits a remarkable antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic phase transition that is first order. It thus shows phase coexistence, usually by proceeding though nucleation at random defect sites followed by propagation of phase boundary domain walls. The transition occurs at a temperature that can be varied by doping other metals onto the Rh site. We have taken advantage of this to yield control over the transition process by preparing an epilayer with oppositely directed doping gradients of Pd and Ir throughout its height, yielding a gradual transition that occurs between 350~K and 500~K. As the sample is heated, a horizontal antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic phase boundary domain wall moves gradually up through the layer, its position controlled by the temperature. This mobile magnetic domain wall affects the magnetisation and resistivity of the layer in a way that can be controlled, and hence exploited, for novel device applications.
  • We have studied how the magnetic properties of oxygen-deficient EuO sputtered thin films vary as a function of thickness. The magnetic moment, measured by polarized neutron reflectometry, and the Curie temperature are found to decrease with reducing thickness. Our results indicate that the reduced number of nearest neighbors, band bending and the partial depopulation of the electronic states that carry the spins associated with the 4f orbitals of Eu are all contributing factors in the surface-induced change of the magnetic properties of EuO$_{1-x}$.