• New massively redundant low frequency arrays allow for a novel investigation of closure relations in interferometry. We employ commissioning data from the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array to investigate closure quantities in this densely packed grid array of 14m antennas operating at 100 MHz to 200 MHz. We investigate techniques that utilize closure phase spectra for redundant triads to estimate departures from redundancy for redundant baseline visibilities. We find a median absolute deviation from redundancy in closure phase across the observed frequency range of about 4.5deg. This value translates into a non-redundancy per visibility phase of about 2.6deg, using prototype electronics. The median absolute deviations from redundancy decrease with longer baselines. We show that closure phase spectra can be used to identify ill-behaved antennas in the array, independent of calibration. We investigate the temporal behavior of closure spectra. The Allan variance increases after a one minute stride time, due to passage of the sky through the primary beam of the transit telescope. However, the closure spectra repeat to well within the noise per measurement at corresponding local sidereal times (LST) from day to day. In future papers in this series we will develop the technique of using closure phase spectra in the search for the HI 21cm signal from cosmic reionization.
  • We consider the capabilities of current and future large facilities operating at 2\,mm to 3\,mm wavelength to detect and image the [CII] 158\,$\mu$m line from galaxies into the cosmic "dark ages" ($z \sim 10$ to 20). The [CII] line may prove to be a powerful tool in determining spectroscopic redshifts, and galaxy dynamics, for the first galaxies. We emphasize that the nature, and even existence, of such extreme redshift galaxies, remains at the frontier of open questions in galaxy formation. In 40\,hr, ALMA has the sensitivity to detect the integrated [CII] line emission from a moderate metallicity, active star-forming galaxy [$Z_A = 0.2\,Z_{\odot}$; star formation rate (SFR) = 5\,$M_\odot$\,yr$^{-1}$], at $z = 10$ at a significance of 6$\sigma$. The next-generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) will detect the integrated [CII] line emission from a Milky-Way like star formation rate galaxy ($Z_{A} = 0.2\,Z_{\odot}$, SFR = 1\,$M_\odot$\,yr$^{-1}$), at $z = 15$ at a significance of 6$\sigma$. Imaging simulations show that the ngVLA can determine rotation dynamics for active star-forming galaxies at $z \sim 15$, if they exist. Based on our very limited knowledge of the extreme redshift Universe, we calculate the count rate in blind, volumetric surveys for [CII] emission at $z \sim 10$ to 20. The detection rates in blind surveys will be slow (of order unity per 40\,hr pointing). However, the observations are well suited to commensal searches. We compare [CII] with the [OIII] 88$\mu$m line, and other ancillary information in high $z$ galaxies that would aid these studies.
  • We present direct estimates of the mean sky brightness temperature in observing bands around 99GHz and 242GHz due to line emission from distant galaxies. These values are calculated from the summed line emission observed in a blind, deep survey for specrtal line emission from high redshift galaxies using ALMA (the 'ASPECS' survey). In the 99 GHz band, the mean brightness will be dominated by rotational transitions of CO from intermediate and high redshift galaxies. In the 242GHz band, the emission could be a combination of higher order CO lines, and possibly [CII] 158$\mu$m line emission from very high redshift galaxies ($z \sim 6$ to 7). The mean line surface brightness is a quantity that is relevant to measurements of spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background, and as a potential tool for studying large-scale structures in the early Universe using intensity mapping. While the cosmic volume and the number of detections are admittedly small, this pilot survey provides a direct measure of the mean line surface brightness, independent of conversion factors, excitation, or other galaxy formation model assumptions. The mean surface brightness in the 99GHZ band is: $T_B = 0.94\pm 0.09$ $\mu$K. In the 242GHz band, the mean brightness is: $T_B = 0.55\pm 0.033$ $\mu$K. These should be interpreted as lower limits on the average sky signal, since we only include lines detected individually in the blind survey, while in a low resolution intensity mapping experiment, there will also be the summed contribution from lower luminosity galaxies that cannot be detected individually in the current blind survey.
  • We investigate the use of closure phase as a method to detect the HI 21cm signal from the neutral IGM during cosmic reionzation. Closure quantities have the unique advantage of being independent of antenna-based calibration terms. We employ realistic, large area sky models from Sims et al. (2016). These include an estimate of the HI 21cm signal generated using 21cm FAST, plus continuum models of both the diffuse Galactic synchrotron emission and the extragalactic point sources. We employ the CASA simulator and adopt the Dillon-Parsons HERA configuration to generate a uv measurement set. We then use AIPS to calculate the closure phases as a function of frequency ('closure spectra'), and python scripts for subsequent analysis. We find that the closure spectra for the HI signal show dramatic structure in frequency, and based on thermal noise alone, the redundant HERA-331 array should detect these fluctuations easily. Comparatively, the frequency structure in the continuum closure spectra is much smoother than that seen in the HI closure spectra. Unfortunately, when the line and continuum signals are combined, the continuum dominates the visibilities at the level of 10^3 to 10^4, and the line signal is lost. We have investigated fitting and removing smooth curves in frequency to the line plus continuum closure spectra, and find that the continuum itself shows enough structure in frequency in the closure spectra to preclude separation of the continuum and line based on such a process. We have also considered the subtraction of the continuum from the visibilities using a sky model, prior to calculation of the closure spectra. TRUNCATED.
  • We summarize the design, capabilities, and some of the priority science goals of a next generation Very Large Array (ngVLA). The ngVLA is an interferometric array with 10x larger effective collecting area and 10x higher spatial resolution than the current VLA and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), optimized for operation in the wavelength range 0.3cm to 3cm. The ngVLA opens a new window on the Universe through ultra-sensitive imaging of thermal line and continuum emission down to milliarcecond resolution, as well as unprecedented broad band continuum polarimetric imaging of non-thermal processes. The continuum resolution will reach 9mas at 1cm, with a brightness temperature sensitivity of 6K in 1 hour. For spectral lines, the array at 1" resolution will reach 0.3K surface brightness sensitivity at 1cm and 10 km/s spectral resolution in 1 hour. These capabilities are the only means with which to answer a broad range of critical scientific questions in modern astronomy, including direct imaging of planet formation in the terrestrial-zone, studies of dust-obscured star formation and the cosmic baryon cycle down to pc-scales out to the Virgo cluster, making a cosmic census of the molecular gas which fuels star formation back to first light and cosmic reionization, and novel techniques for exploring temporal phenomena from milliseconds to years. The ngVLA is optimized for observations at wavelengths between the superb performance of ALMA at submm wavelengths, and the future SKA1 at few centimeter and longer wavelengths. This memo introduces the project. The science capabilities are outlined in a parallel series of white papers. We emphasize that this initial set of science goals are simply a starting point for the project. We invite comment on these programs, as well as new ideas, through our public forum link on the ngVLA web page https://science.nrao.edu/futures/ngvla
  • We present further analysis of the [CII] 158$\mu$m fine structure line and thermal dust continuum emission from the archetype extreme starburst/AGN group of galaxies in the early Universe, BRI 1202-0725 at $z=4.7$, using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. The group is long noted for having a closely separated (26kpc in projection) FIR-hyperluminous quasar host galaxy and an optically obscured submm galaxy (SMG). A short ALMA test observation reveals a rich laboratory for the study of the myriad processes involved in clustered massive galaxy formation in the early Universe. Strong [CII] emission from the SMG and the quasar have been reported earlier by Wagg et al. (2012) based on these observations. In this letter, we examine in more detail the imaging results from the ALMA observations, including velocity channel images, position-velocity plots, and line moment images. We present detections of [CII] emission from two Ly$\alpha$-selected galaxies in the group, demonstrating the relative ease with which ALMA can detect the [CII] emission from lower star formation rate galaxies at high redshift. Imaging of the [CII] emission shows a clear velocity gradient across the SMG, possibly indicating rotation or a more complex dynamical system on a scale $\sim 10$kpc. There is evidence in the quasar spectrum and images for a possible outflow toward the southwest, as well as more extended emission (a 'bridge'), between the quasar and the SMG, although the latter could simply be emission from Ly$\alpha$-1 blending with that of the quasar at the limited spatial resolution of the current observations. These results provide an unprecedented view of a major merger of gas rich galaxies driving extreme starbursts and AGN accretion during the formation of massive galaxies and supermassive black holes within 1.3 Gyr of the Big Bang.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the [CII] 157.7micron fine structure line and thermal dust continuum emission from a pair of gas-rich galaxies at z=4.7, BR1202-0725. This system consists of a luminous quasar host galaxy and a bright submm galaxy (SMG), while a fainter star-forming galaxy is also spatially coincident within a 4" (25 kpc) region. All three galaxies are detected in the submm continuum, indicating FIR luminosities in excess of 10^13 Lsun for the two most luminous objects. The SMG and the quasar host galaxy are both detected in [CII] line emission with luminosities, L([CII]) = (10.0 +/- 1.5)x10^9 Lsun and L([CII]) = (6.5+/-1.0)x10^9 Lsun, respectively. We estimate a luminosity ratio, L([CII])/L(FIR) = (8.3+/-1.2)x10^-4 for the starburst SMG to the North, and L([CII])/L(FIR) = (2.5+/-0.4)x10^-4 for the quasar host galaxy, in agreement with previous high-redshift studies that suggest lower [CII]-to-FIR luminosity ratios in quasars than in starburst galaxies. The third fainter object with a flux density, S(340GHz) = 1.9+/-0.3 mJy, is coincident with a Ly-Alpha emitter and is detected in HST ACS F775W and F814W images but has no clear counterpart in the H-band. Even if this third companion does not lie at a similar redshift to BR1202-0725, the quasar and the SMG represent an overdensity of massive, infrared luminous star-forming galaxies within 1.3 Gyr of the Big Bang.
  • We present high resolution imaging of the low order (J=1 and 2) CO line emission from the z = 3.93 submillimeter galaxy (SMG) MM18423+5938 using the Expanded Very Large Array, and optical and near-IR imaging using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. This SMG with a spectroscopic redshift was thought to be gravitationally lensed given its enormous apparent brightness. We find that the CO emission is consistent with a complete Einstein ring with a major axis diameter of ~ 1.4", indicative of lensing. We have also identified the lens galaxy as a very red elliptical coincident with the geometric center of the ring and estimated its photometric redshift z~1.1. A first estimate of the lens magnification factor is m~12. The luminosity L'_CO(1-0) of the CO(1-0) emission is 2.71+/-0.38 x10^11/m K km s^-1 pc^2, and, adopting the commonly used conversion factor for ULIRGs, the molecular gas mass is M(H_2) = 2.2 x10^11/m M_sol, comparable to unlensed SMGs if corrected by m ~ 12. Our revised estimate of the far-IR luminosity of MM18423+5938 is 2 x10^13/m < L_FIR < 3 x10^14/m L_sol, comparable to that of ULIRGs. Further observations are required to quantify the star formation rate in MM18423+5938 and to constrain the mass model of the lens in more detail.
  • We present observations of the molecular gas in the GN20 proto-cluster of galaxies at $z =4.05$ using the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). This group of galaxies is the ideal laboratory for studying the formation of massive galaxies via luminous, gas-rich starbursts within 1.6 Gyr of the Big Bang. We detect three galaxies in the proto-cluster in CO 2-1 emission, with gas masses (H$_2$) between $10^{10}$ and $10^{11} \times (\alpha/0.8)$ M$_\odot$. The emission from the brightest source, GN20, is resolved with a size $\sim 2"$, and has a clear north-south velocity gradient, possibly indicating ordered rotation. The gas mass in GN20 is comparable to the stellar mass ($1.3\times 10^{11} \times (\alpha/0.8)$ M$_\odot$ and $2.3\times 10^{11}$ M$_\odot$, respectively), and the sum of gas plus stellar mass is comparable to the dynamical mass of the system ($\sim 3.4\times 10^{11} [sin(i)/sin(45^o)]^{-2}$ M$_\odot$), within a 5kpc radius. There is also evidence for a tidal tail extending another $2"$ north of the galaxy with a narrow velocity dispersion. GN20 may be a massive, gas rich disk that is gravitationally disturbed, but not completely disrupted. There is one Lyman-break galaxy (BD29079) in the GN20 proto-cluster with an optical spectroscopic redshift within our search volume, and we set a 3$\sigma$ limit to the molecular gas mass of this galaxy of $1.1\times 10^{10} \times (\alpha/0.8)$ M$_\odot$.
  • Line and continuum studies at centimeter through submillimeter wavelengths address probe deep into the earliest, most active and dust obscured phases of galaxy formation, and reveal the molecular and cool atomic gas. We summarize the techniques of radio astronomy to perform these studies, then review the progress on radio studies of galaxy formation. The dominant work over the last decade has focused on massive, luminous starburst galaxies (submm galaxies and AGN host galaxies). The far infrared luminosities are ~ 1e13 Lsun, implying star formation rates, SFR > 1e3 Msun/year. Molecular gas reservoirs are found with masses: M(H_2) > 1e10 (alpha/0.8}) Msun. The CO excitation in these luminous systems is much higher than in low redshift spiral galaxies. Imaging of the gas distribution and dynamics suggests strongly interacting and merging galaxies, indicating gravitationally induced, short duration (~ 1e7 year) starbursts. These systems correspond to a major star formation episode in massive galaxies in proto-clusters at intermediate to high redshift. Recently, radio observations have probed the more typical star forming galaxy population (SFR ~ 100 Msun/year), during the peak epoch of Universal star formation (z ~ 1.5 to 2.5). These observations reveal massive gas reservoirs without hyper-starbursts, and show that active star formation occurs over a wide range in galaxy stellar mass. The conditions in this gas are comparable to those found in the Milky Way disk. A key result is that the peak epoch of star formation in the Universe also corresponds to an epoch when the baryon content of star forming galaxies was dominated by molecular gas, not stars. We consider the possibility of tracing out the dense gas history of the Universe, and perform initial, admittedly gross, calculations. ABRIDGED
  • I present a simple calculation of the expected mean CO brightness temperature from the large scale distribution of galaxies during cosmic reionization. The calculation is based on the cosmic star formation rate density required to reionize, and keep ionized, the intergalactic medium, and uses standard relationships between star formation rate, IR luminosity, and CO luminosity derived for star forming galaxies over a wide range in redshift. I find that the mean CO brightness temperature resulting from the galaxies that could reionize the Universe at $z = 8$ is $T_B \sim 1.1 (C/5) (f_{esc}/0.1)^{-1} \mu$K, where $f_{esc}$ is the escape fraction of ionizing photons from the first galaxies, and $C$ is the IGM clumping factor. Intensity mapping of the CO emission from the large scale structure of the star forming galaxies during cosmic reionization on scales of order $10^2$ to 10$^3$ deg$^2$, in combination with HI 21cm imaging of the neutral IGM, will provide a comprehensive study of the earliest epoch of galaxy formation.
  • We analyze the size evolution of HII regions around 27 quasars between z=5.7 to 6.4 ('quasar near-zones' or NZ). We include more sources than previous studies, and we use more accurate redshifts for the host galaxies, with 8 CO molecular line redshifts and 9 MgII redshifts. We confirm the trend for an increase in NZ size with decreasing redshift, with the luminosity normalized proper size evolving as: R_{NZ,corrected} = (7.4 \pm 0.3) - (8.0 \pm 1.1) \times (z-6) Mpc. While derivation of the absolute neutral fraction remains difficult with this technique, the evolution of the NZ sizes suggests a decrease in the neutral fraction of intergalactic hydrogen by a factor ~ 9.4 from z=6.4 to 5.7, in its simplest interpretation. Alternatively, recent numerical simulations suggest that this rapid increase in near-zone size from z=6.4 to 5.7 is due to the rapid increase in the background photo-ionization rate at the end of the percolation or overlap phase, when the average mean free path of ionizing photons increases dramatically. In either case, the results are consistent with the idea that z ~ 6 to 7 corresponds to the tail end of cosmic reionization. The scatter in the normalized NZ sizes is larger than expected simply from measurement errors, and likely reflects intrinsic differences in the quasars or their environments. We find that the near-zone sizes increase with quasar UV luminosity, as expected for photo-ionization dominated by quasar radiation.
  • We present a high resolution (down to 0.18"), multi-transition imaging study of the molecular gas in the z = 4.05 submillimeter galaxy GN20. GN20 is one of the most luminous starburst galaxy known at z > 4, and is a member of a rich proto-cluster of galaxies at z = 4.05 in GOODS-North. We have observed the CO 1-0 and 2-1 emission with the VLA, the CO 6-5 emission with the PdBI Interferometer, and the 5-4 emission with CARMA. The H_2 mass derived from the CO 1-0 emission is 1.3 \times 10^{11} (\alpha/0.8) Mo. High resolution imaging of CO 2-1 shows emission distributed over a large area, appearing as partial ring, or disk, of ~ 10kpc diameter. The integrated CO excitation is higher than found in the inner disk of the Milky Way, but lower than that seen in high redshift quasar host galaxies and low redshift starburst nuclei. The VLA CO 2-1 image at 0.2" resolution shows resolved, clumpy structure, with a few brighter clumps with intrinsic sizes ~ 2 kpc. The velocity field determined from the CO 6-5 emission is consistent with a rotating disk with a rotation velocity of ~ 570 km s^{-1} (using an inclination angle of 45^o), from which we derive a dynamical mass of 3 \times 10^{11} \msun within about 4 kpc radius. The star formation distribution, as derived from imaging of the radio synchrotron and dust continuum, is on a similar scale as the molecular gas distribution. The molecular gas and star formation are offset by ~ 1" from the HST I-band emission, implying that the regions of most intense star formation are highly dust-obscured on a scale of ~ 10 kpc. The large spatial extent and ordered rotation of this object suggests that this is not a major merger, but rather a clumpy disk accreting gas rapidly in minor mergers or smoothly from the proto-intracluster medium. ABSTRACT TRUNCATED
  • We present evidence for Milky-Way-like, low-excitation molecular gas reservoirs in near-IR selected massive galaxies at z~1.5, based on IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer CO[3-2] and NRAO Very Large Array CO[1-0] line observations for two galaxies that had been previously detected in CO[2-1] emission. The CO[3-2] flux of BzK-21000 at z=1.522 is comparable within the errors to its CO[2-1] flux, implying that the CO[3-2] transition is significantly sub-thermally excited. The combined CO[1-0] observations of the two sources result in a detection at the 3 sigma level that is consistent with a higher CO[1-0] luminosity than that of CO[2-1]. Contrary to what is observed in submillimeter galaxies and QSOs, in which the CO transitions are thermally excited up to J>=3, these galaxies have low-excitation molecular gas, similar to that in the Milky Way and local spirals. This is the first time that such conditions have been observed at high redshift. A Large Velocity Gradient analysis suggests that molecular clouds with density and kinetic temperature comparable to local spirals can reproduce our observations. The similarity in the CO excitation properties suggests that a high, Milky-Way-like, CO to H_2 conversion factor could be appropriate for these systems. If such low-excitation properties are representative of ordinary galaxies at high redshift, centimeter telescopes such as the Expanded Very Large Array and the longest wavelength Atacama Large Millimeter Array bands will be the best tools for studying the molecular gas content in these systems through the observations of CO emission lines.
  • When, and how, did the first galaxies and supermassive black holes (SMBH) form, and how did they reionization the Universe? First galaxy formation and cosmic reionization are among the last frontiers in studies of cosmic structure formation. We delineate the detailed astrophysical probes of early galaxy and SMBH formation afforded by observations at centimeter through submillimeter wavelengths. These observations include studies of the molecular gas (= the fuel for star formation in galaxies), atomic fine structure lines (= the dominant ISM gas coolant), thermal dust continuum emission (= an ideal star formation rate estimator), and radio continuum emission from star formation and relativistic jets. High resolution spectroscopic imaging can be used to study galaxy dynamics and star formation on sub-kpc scales. These cm and mm observations are the necessary compliment to near-IR observations, which probe the stars and ionized gas, and X-ray observations, which reveal the AGN. Together, a suite of revolutionary observatories planned for the next decade from centimeter to X-ray wavelengths will provide the requisite panchromatic view of the complex processes involved in the formation of the first generation of galaxies and SMBHs, and cosmic reionization.
  • We report the detection of CO molecular line emission in the z=4.5 millimeter-detected galaxy COSMOS_J100054+023436 (hereafter: J100+0234) using the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) and NRAO's Very Large Array (VLA). The CO(4-3) line as observed with PdBI has a full line width of ~1000 km/s, an integrated line flux of 0.66 Jy km/s, and a CO luminosity of 3.2e10 L_sun. Comparison to the 3.3sigma detection of the CO(2-1) line emission with the VLA suggests that the molecular gas is likely thermalized to the J=4-3 transition level. The corresponding molecular gas mass is 2.6e10 M_sun assuming an ULIRG-like conversion factor. From the spatial offset of the red- and blue-shifted line peaks and the line width a dynamical mass of 1.1e11 M_sun is estimated assuming a merging scenario. The molecular gas distribution coincides with the rest-frame optical and radio position of the object while being offset by 0.5'' from the previously detected Ly$\alpha$ emission. J1000+0234 exhibits very typical properties for lower redshift (z~2) sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) and thus is very likely one of the long sought after high redshift (z>4) objects of this population. The large CO(4-3) line width taken together with its highly disturbed rest-frame UV geometry suggest an ongoing major merger about a billion years after the Big Bang. Given its large star formation rate (SFR) of >1000 M_sun/yr and molecular gas content this object could be the precursor of a 'red-and-dead' elliptical observed at a redshift of z=2.
  • We present an analysis of the radio properties of large samples of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at $z \sim 3$, 4, and 5 from the COSMOS field. The median stacking analysis yields a statistical detection of the $z \sim 3$ LBGs (U-band drop-outs), with a 1.4 GHz flux density of $0.90 \pm 0.21 \mu$Jy. The stacked emission is unresolved, with a size $< 1"$, or a physical size $< 8$kpc. The total star formation rate implied by this radio luminosity is $31\pm 7$ $M_\odot$ year$^{-1}$, based on the radio-FIR correlation in low redshift star forming galaxies. The star formation rate derived from a similar analysis of the UV luminosities is 17 $M_\odot$ year$^{-1}$, without any correction for UV dust attenuation. The simplest conclusion is that the dust attenuation factor is 1.8 at UV wavelengths. However, this factor is considerably smaller than the standard attenuation factor $\sim 5$, normally assumed for LBGs. We discuss potential reasons for this discrepancy, including the possibility that the dust attenuation factor at $z \ge 3$ is smaller than at lower redshifts. Conversely, the radio luminosity for a given star formation rate may be systematically lower at very high redshift. Two possible causes for a suppressed radio luminosity are: (i) increased inverse Compton cooling of the relativistic electron population due to scattering off the increasing CMB at high redshift, or (ii) cosmic ray diffusion from systematically smaller galaxies. The radio detections of individual sources are consistent with a radio-loud AGN fraction of 0.3%. One source is identified as a very dusty, extreme starburst galaxy (a 'submm galaxy').
  • I update the SKA key science program (KSP) on first light and cosmic reionization. The KSP has two themes: (i) Using the 21cm line of neutral hydrogen as the most direct probe into the evolution of the neutral intergalactic medium during cosmic reionization. Such HI 21cm studies are potentially the most important new window on cosmology since the discovery of the CMB. (ii) Observing the gas, dust, star formation, and dynamics, of the first galaxies and AGN. Observations at cm and mm wavelengths, provide an unobscured view of galaxy formation within 1 Gyr of the Big Bang, and are an ideal complement to the study of stars, ionized gas, and AGN done using near-IR telescopes. I summarize HI 21cm signals, challenges, and telescopes under construction. I also discuss the prospects for studying the pre-galactic medium, prior to first light, using a low frequency telescope on the Moon. I then review the current status of mm and cm observations of the most known distant galaxies (z > 6). I make the simple argument that even a 10% SKA-high demonstrator will have a profound impact on the study of the first galaxies. In particular, extending the SKA to the 'natural' atmospheric limit (set by the O_2 line) of 45 GHz, increases the effective sensitivity to thermal emission by another factor four.
  • We present observations with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer of three QSOs at z>5 aimed at detecting molecular gas in their host galaxies as traced by CO transitions. CO (5-4) is detected in SDSSJ033829.31+002156.3 at z=5.0267, placing it amongst the most distant sources detected in CO. The CO emission is unresolved with a beam size of ~1", implying that the molecular gas is contained within a compact region, less than ~3kpc in radius. We infer an upper limit on the dynamical mass of the CO emitting region of ~3x10^10 Msun/sin(i)^2. The comparison with the Black Hole mass inferred from near-IR data suggests that the BH-to-bulge mass ratio in this galaxy is significantly higher than in local galaxies. From the CO luminosity we infer a mass reservoir of molecular gas as high as M(H2)=2.4x10^10 Msun, implying that the molecular gas accounts for a significant fraction of the dynamical mass. When compared to the star formation rate derived from the far-IR luminosity, we infer a very short gas exhaustion timescale (~10^7 yrs), comparable to the dynamical timescale. CO is not detected in the other two QSOs (SDSSJ083643.85+005453.3 and SDSSJ163033.90+401209.6) and upper limits are given for their molecular gas content. When combined with CO observations of other type 1 AGNs, spanning a wide redshift range (0<z<6.4), we find that the host galaxy CO luminosity (hence molecular gas content) and the AGN optical luminosity (hence BH accretion rate) are correlated, but the relation is not linear: L(CO) ~ [lambda*L_lambda(4400A)]^0.72. Moreover, at high redshifts (and especially at z>5) the CO luminosity appears to saturate. We discuss the implications of these findings in terms of black hole-galaxy co-evolution.
  • The gravitational lens toward B0218+357 offers the unique possibility to study cool moderately dense gas with high sensitivity and angular resolution in a cloud that existed half a Hubble time ago. Observations of the radio continuum and six formaldehyde (H2CO) lines were carried out with the VLA, the Plateau de Bure interferometer, and the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. Three radio continuum maps indicate a flux density ratio between the two main images, A and B, of ~ 3.4 +/- 0.2. Within the errors the ratio is the same at 8.6, 14.1, and 43 GHz. The 1_{01}-0_{00} line of para-H2CO is shown to absorb the continuum of image A. Large Velocity Gradient radiative transfer calculations are performed to reproduce the optical depths of the observed two cm-wave "K-doublet" and four mm-wave rotational lines. These calculations also account for a likely frequency-dependent continuum cloud coverage. Confirming the diffuse nature of the cloud, an n(H2) density of < 1000 cm^{-3} is derived, with the best fit suggesting n(H2) ~ 200 cm^{-3}. The H2CO column density of the main velocity component is ~5 * 10^{13} cm^{-2}, to which about 7.5 * 10^{12} cm^{-2} has to be added to also account for a weaker feature on the blue side, 13 km/s apart. N(H2CO)/N(NH3) ~ 0.6, which is four times less than the average ratio obtained from a small number of local diffuse (galactic) clouds seen in absorption. The ortho-to-para H2CO abundance ratio is 2.0 - 3.0, which is consistent with the kinetic temperature of the molecular gas associated with the lens of B0218+357. With the gas kinetic temperature and density known, it is found that optically thin transitions of CS, HCN, HNC, HCO+, and N2H+ (but not CO) will provide excellent probes of the cosmic microwave background at redshift z=0.68.
  • We have searched for HI 21cm absorption toward the two brightest radio AGN at high redshift, J0924--2201 at $z = 5.20$, and J0913+5919 at $z=5.11$, using the Giant Meter Wave Radio Telescope (GMRT). These data set a 3$\sigma$ upper limit to absorption of $< 30%$ at 40 km s$^{-1}$ resolution for the 30 mJy source J0913+5919, and $< 3%$ for the 0.55 Jy source J0924--2201 at 20 km s$^{-1}$ resolution. For J0924--2201, limits to broader lines at the few percent level are set by residual spectral baseline structure. For J0924--2201 the column density limit per 20 km s $^{-1}$ channel is: N(HI) $< 2.2\times 10^{18} \rm T_s$ cm$^{-2}$ over a velocity range of -700 km s$^{-1}$ to $+1180$ km s$^{-1}$ centered on the galaxy redshift determined through CO emission, assuming a covering factor of one. For J0913+5919 the column density limit per 40 km s$^{-1}$ channel is: N(HI) $< 2.2\times 10^{19} \rm T_s$ cm$^{-2}$ within $\pm 2400$ km s$^{-1}$ of the optical redshift. These data rule out any cool, high column density HI clouds within roughly $\pm 1000$ km s$^{-1}$ of the galaxies, as are often seen in Compact Steep Spectrum radio AGN, or clouds that might correspond to residual gas left over from cosmic reionization.
  • We discuss observations of the first galaxies, within cosmic reionization, at centimeter and millimeter wavelengths. We present a summary of current observations of the host galaxies of the most distant QSOs ($z \sim 6$). These observations reveal the gas, dust, and star formation in the host galaxies on kpc-scales. These data imply an enriched ISM in the QSO host galaxies within 1 Gyr of the big bang, and are consistent with models of coeval supermassive black hole and spheroidal galaxy formation in major mergers at high redshift. Current instruments are limited to studying truly pathologic objects at these redshifts, meaning hyper-luminous infrared galaxies ($L_{FIR} \sim 10^{13}$ L$_\odot$). ALMA will provide the one to two orders of magnitude improvement in millimeter astronomy required to study normal star forming galaxies (ie. Ly-$\alpha$ emitters) at $z \sim 6$. ALMA will reveal, at sub-kpc spatial resolution, the thermal gas and dust -- the fundamental fuel for star formation -- in galaxies into cosmic reionization.
  • In this paper we report detection of multiple component structures in a Chandra X-ray image obtained in March 2001 of the nearby symbiotic interacting binary system CH Cyg. These components include a compact central source, an arc-like structure or a loop extending to 1.5'' (400 AU) from the central source associated with the 1997 jet activity, and possibly a newly formed jet extending to about 150 AU from the central source. The structures are also visible in VLA and HST images obtained close in time to the Chandra observations. The emission from the loop is consistent with optically thin thermal X-ray emission originating from a shock resulting from interaction of the jet ejecta with the dense circumbinary material. The emission from the central source originates within less then 50 AU region, and is likely associated with the accretion disk around the white dwarf. CH Cyg is only the second symbiotic system with jet activity detected at X-ray wavelengths, and the Chandra high-angular resolution image, combined with the VLA and HST images, provides the closest view of the region of jet formation and interaction with the circumbinary material in a symbiotic binary.
  • We present observations at 1.4 and 250 GHz of the $z\sim 5.7$ Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAE) in the COSMOS field found by Murayama et al.. At 1.4 GHz there are 99 LAEs in the lower noise regions of the radio field. We do not detect any individual source down to 3$\sigma$ limits of $\sim 30\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ at 1.4 GHz, nor do we detect a source in a stacking analysis, to a 2$\sigma$ limit of $2.5\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$. At 250 GHz we do not detect any of the 10 LAEs that are located within the central regions of the COSMOS field covered by MAMBO ($20' \times 20'$) to a typical 2$\sigma$ limit of $S_{250} < 2$mJy. The radio data imply that there are no low luminosity radio AGN with $L_{1.4} > 6\times 10^{24}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ in the LAE sample. The radio and millimeter observations also rule out any highly obscured, extreme starbursts in the sample, ie. any galaxies with massive star formation rates $> 1500$ M$_\odot$ year$^{-1}$ in the full sample (based on the radio data), or 500 M$_\odot$ year$^{-1}$ for the 10% of the LAE sample that fall in the central MAMBO field. The stacking analysis implies an upper limit to the mean massive star formation rate of $\sim 100$ M$_\odot$ year$^{-1}$.
  • I review the potential for observing cosmic reionization using the HI 21cm line of neutral hydrogren. Studies include observations of the evolution of large scale structure of the IGM (density, excitation temperature, and neutral fraction), through HI 21cm emission, as well as observations of small to intermediate scale structure through absorption toward the first discrete radio sources. I summarize predictions for the HI signals, then consider capabilities of facilities being built, or planned, to detect these signals. I also discuss the significant observational challenges.