• We study how the energy and momentum resolution of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) affects the linewidth, Fermi crossing, velocity, and curvature of the measured band structure. Based on the fact that the resolution smooths out the spectra, acting as a low-pass filter, we develop an iterative simulation scheme that compensates for resolution effects and allows the fundamental physical parameters to be accurately extracted. By simulating a parabolic band structure of Fermi-liquid quasiparticles, we show that this method works for an energy resolution up to 100 meV and a momentum resolution equal to twice the energy resolution scaled by the Fermi velocity. Our analysis acquires particular relevance in the hard and soft x-ray regimes, where a degraded resolution limits the accuracy of the extracted physical parameters, making it possible to study how the electronic excitations are modified when the ARPES probing depth increases beyond the surface.
  • We study the manipulation of the photoelectron spin-polarization in Bi$_2$Se$_3$ by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. General rules are established that enable controlling the spin-polarization of photoemitted electrons via light polarization, sample orientation, and photon energy. We demonstrate the $\pm$100% reversal of a single component of the measured spin-polarization vector upon the rotation of light polarization, as well as a full three-dimensional manipulation by varying experimental configuration and photon energy. While a material-specific density-functional theory analysis is needed for the quantitative description, a minimal two-atomic-layer model qualitatively accounts for the spin response based on the interplay of optical selection rules, photoelectron interference, and topological surface-state complex structure. It follows that photoelectron spin-polarization control is generically achievable in systems with a layer-dependent, entangled spin-orbital texture.
  • We study Bi2Se3 by polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and density-functional theory slab calculations. We find that the surface state Dirac fermions are characterized by a layer-dependent entangled spin-orbital texture, which becomes apparent through quantum interference effects. This explains the discrepancy between the spin polarization from spin-resovled ARPES - ranging from 20 to 85% - and the 100% value assumed in phenomenological models. It also suggests a way to probe the intrinsic spin texture of topological insulators, and to continuously manipulate the spin polarization of photoelectrons and photocurrents all the way from 0 to +/-100% by an appropriate choice of photon energy, linear polarization, and angle of incidence.
  • In search of the potential realization of novel normal-state phases on the surface of Sr2RuO4 - those stemming from either topological bulk properties or the interplay between spin-orbit coupling (SO) and the broken symmetry of the surface - we revisit the electronic structure of the top-most layers by ARPES with improved data quality as well as ab-initio LDA slab calculations. We find that the current model of a single surface layer (\surd2x\surd2)R45{\deg} reconstruction does not explain all detected features. The observed depth-dependent signal degradation, together with the close quantitative agreement with LDA+SO slab calculations based on the LEED-determined surface crystal structure, reveal that (at a minimum) the sub-surface layer also undergoes a similar although weaker reconstruction. This points to a surface-to-bulk progression of the electronic states driven by structural instabilities, with no evidence for Dirac and Rashba-type states or surface magnetism.
  • We study Na2IrO3 by ARPES, optics, and band structure calculations in the local-density approximation (LDA). The weak dispersion of the Ir 5d-t2g manifold highlights the importance of structural distortions and spin-orbit coupling (SO) in driving the system closer to a Mott transition. We detect an insulating gap {\Delta}_gap = 340 meV which, at variance with a Slater-type description, is already open at 300 K and does not show significant temperature dependence even across T_N ~ 15 K. An LDA analysis with the inclusion of SO and Coulomb repulsion U reveals that, while the prodromes of an underlying insulating state are already found in LDA+SO, the correct gap magnitude can only be reproduced by LDA+SO+U, with U = 3 eV. This establishes Na2IrO3 as a novel type of Mott-like correlated insulator in which Coulomb and relativistic effects have to be treated on an equal footing.
  • The electronic structure of Bi2Se3 is studied by angle-resolved photoemission and density functional theory. We show that the instability of the surface electronic properties, observed even in ultra-high-vacuum conditions, can be overcome via in-situ potassium deposition. In addition to accurately setting the carrier concentration, new Rashba-like spin-polarized states are induced, with a tunable, reversible, and highly stable spin splitting. Ab-initio slab calculations reveal that these Rashba state are derived from the 5QL quantum-well states. While the K-induced potential gradient enhances the spin splitting, this might be already present for pristine surfaces due to the symmetry breaking of the vacuum-solid interface.
  • We examine multiple techniques for extracting information from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data, and test them against simulated spectral functions for electron-phonon coupling. We find that, in the low-coupling regime, it is possible to extract self-energy and bare-band parameters through a self-consistent Kramers-Kronig bare-band fitting routine. We also show that the effective coupling parameters deduced from the renormalization of quasiparticle mass, velocity, and spectral weight are momentum dependent and, in general, distinct from the true microscopic coupling; the latter is thus not readily accessible in the quasiparticle dispersion revealed by ARPES.