• Radio and X-ray emission from brown dwarfs suggest that an ionised gas and a magnetic field with a sufficient flux density must be present. We perform a reference study for late M-dwarfs, brown dwarfs and giant gas planet to identify which ultra-cool objects are most susceptible to plasma and magnetic processes. Only thermal ionisation is considered. We utilise the {\sc Drift-Phoenix} model grid where the local atmospheric structure is determined by the global parameters T$_{\rm eff}$, $\log(g)$ and [M/H]. Our results show that it is not unreasonable to expect H$_{\alpha}$ or radio emission to origin from Brown Dwarf atmospheres as in particular the rarefied upper parts of the atmospheres can be magnetically coupled despite having low degrees of thermal gas ionisation. Such ultra-cool atmospheres could therefore drive auroral emission without the need for a companion's wind or an outgassing moon. The minimum threshold for the magnetic flux density required for electrons and ions to be magnetised is well above typical values of the global magnetic field of a brown dwarf and a giant gas planet. Na$^{+}$, K$^{+}$ and Ca$^{+}$ are the dominating electron donors in low-density atmospheres (low log(g), solar metallicity) independent of T$_{\rm eff}$. Mg$^{+}$ and Fe$^{+}$ dominate the thermal ionisation in the inner parts of M-dwarf atmospheres. Molecules remain unimportant for thermal ionisation. Chemical processes (e.g. cloud formation) affecting the most abundant electron donors, Mg and Fe, will have a direct impact on the state of ionisation in ultra-cool atmospheres.
  • We present a novel description of how energetic electrons may be ejected from the pulsar interior into the atmosphere, based on the collective electrostatic oscillations of interior electrons confined to move parallel to the magnetic field. The size of the interior magnetic field influences the interior plasma frequency, via the associated matter density compression. The plasma oscillations occur close to the regions of maximum magnetic field curvature, that is, close to the magnetic poles where the majority of magnetic flux emerges. Given that these oscillations have a density-dependent maximum amplitude before wave-breaking occurs, such waves can eject energetic electrons using only the self-field of the electron population in the interior. Moreover, photons emitted by electrons in the bulk of the oscillation can escape along the field lines by virtue of the lower opacity there (and the fact that they are emitted predominantly in this direction), leading to features in the spectra of pulsars.
  • Electrostatic oscillations in cold electron-positron plasmas can be coupled to a propagating electromagnetic mode if the background magnetic field is inhomogeneous. Previous work considered this coupling in the quasi-linear regime, successfully simulating the electromagnetic mode. Here we present a stability analysis of the non-linear problem, perturbed from dynamical equilibrium, in order to gain some insight into the modes present in the system.