• We report our detailed data analysis for 39 $\gamma$-ray sources selected from the 992 unassociated sources in the \textit{Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) third source catalog. The selection criteria, which were set for finding candidate millisecond pulsars (MSPs), are non-variables with curved spectra and $>$5$^{\circ}$ Galactic latitudes. From our analysis, 24 sources were found to be point-like sources not contaminated by background or nearby unknown sources. Three of them, J1544.6$-$1125, J1625.1$-$0021, and J1653.6$-$0158, have been previously studied, indicating that they are likely MSPs. The spectra of J0318.1+0252 and J2053.9+2922 do not have properties similar to that of known $\gamma$-ray MSPs, and we thus suggest that they are not MSPs. Analysis of archival X-ray data for most of the 24 sources were also conducted. Four sources were found with X-ray objects in their error circles, and 16 with no detection. The ratios between the $\gamma$-ray fluxes and X-ray fluxes or flux upper limits are generally lower than those of the known $\gamma$-ray MSPs, suggesting that if the $\gamma$-ray sources are MSPs, none of the X-ray objects are the counterparts. Deep X-ray or radio observations of these sources are needed in order to identify their MSP nature.
  • The high-velocity features (HVFs) in optical spectra of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are examined with a large sample including very early-time spectra (e.g., t < -7 days). Multiple Gaussian fits are applied to examine the HVFs and their evolutions, using constraints on expansion velocities for the same species (i.e., SiII 5972 and SiII 6355). We find that strong HVFs tend to appear in SNe Ia with smaller decline rates (e.g., dm15(B)<1.4 mag), clarifying that the finding by Childress et al. (2014) for the Ca-HVFs in near-maximum-light spectra applies both to the Si-HVFs and Ca-HVFs in the earlier phase. The Si-HVFs seem to be more common in fast-expanding SNe Ia, which is different from the earlier result that the Ca-HVFs are associated with SNe Ia having slower SiII 6355 velocities at maximum light (i.e., Vsi). This difference can be due to that the HVFs in fast-expanding SNe Ia usually disappear more rapidly and are easily blended with the photospheric components when approaching the maximum light. Moreover, SNe Ia with both stronger HVFs at early phases and larger Vsi are found to have noticeably redder B-V colors and occur preferentially in the inner regions of their host galaxies, while those with stronger HVFs but smaller Vsi show opposite tendencies, suggesting that these two subclasses have different explosion environments and their HVFs may have different origins. We further examine the relationships between the absorption features of SiII 6355 and CaII IR lines, and find that their photospheric components are well correlated in velocity and strength but the corresponding HVFs show larger scatter. These results cannot be explained with ionization and/or thermal processes alone, and different mechanisms are required for the creation of HVF-forming region in SNe Ia.
  • We report the results of our observations of the S255IR area with the SMA at 1.3 mm in the very extended configuration and at 0.8 mm in the compact configuration as well as with the IRAM-30m at 0.8 mm. The best achieved angular resolution is about 0.4 arcsec. The dust continuum emission and several tens of molecular spectral lines are observed. The majority of the lines is detected only towards the S255IR-SMA1 clump, which represents a rotating structure (probably disk) around the young massive star. The achieved angular resolution is still insufficient for conclusions about Keplerian or non-Keplerian character of the rotation. The temperature of the molecular gas reaches 130-180 K. The size of the clump is about 500 AU. The clump is strongly fragmented as follows from the low beam filling factor. The mass of the hot gas is significantly lower than the mass of the central star. A strong DCN emission near the center of the hot core most probably indicates a presence of a relatively cold ($\lesssim 80$ K) and rather massive clump there. High velocity emission is observed in the CO line as well as in lines of high density tracers HCN, HCO+, CS and other molecules. The outflow morphology obtained from combination of the SMA and IRAM-30m data is significantly different from that derived from the SMA data alone. The CO emission detected with the SMA traces only one boundary of the outflow. The outflow is most probably driven by jet bow shocks created by episodic ejections from the center. We detected a dense high velocity clump associated apparently with one of the bow shocks. The outflow strongly affects the chemical composition of the surrounding medium.
  • We report our discovery of orbitally modulated $\gamma$-ray emission from the black widow system PSR J1311-3430. We analyze the \textit{Fermi} Large Area Telescope data during the offpulse phase interval of the pulsar, and find the orbital modulation signal at a $\sim$3$\sigma$ confidence level. Further spectral analysis shows no significant differences for the spectra obtained during the bright and faint orbital phase ranges. A simple sinusoid-like function can describe the modulation. Given these properties, we suggest that the intrabinary $\gamma$-ray emission arises from the region close to the companion and the modulation is caused by the occultation of the emitting region by the companion, similar to that is seen in the transitional millisecond pulsar binary (MSP) PSR J1023+0038. Considering the X-ray detection of intrabinary shock emission from eclipsing MSP binaries recently reported, this discovery further suggests the general existence of intrabinary $\gamma$-ray emission from them.
  • In the WISE all-sky source catalogue there are 76 million mid-infrared (MIR) point sources that were detected at the first three WISE bands and have association with only one 2MASS near-IR source within 3 arcsec. We search for their identifications in the SIMBAD database and find 3.2 million identified sources. Based on these known sources, we establish three criteria for selecting candidate AGB stars in the Galaxy, which are three defined occupation zones in a color-color diagram, Galactic latitude |gb|< 20 deg, and "corrected" WISE third-band W3c < 11. Applying these criteria to the WISE+2MASS sources, 1.37 million of them are selected. We analyze the WISE third-band W3 distribution of the selected sources, and further establish that W3 < 8 is required in order to exclude a large fraction of normal stars in them. We therefore find 0.47 million candidate AGB stars in our Galaxy from the WISE source catalogue. Using W3c, we estimate their distances and derive their Galactic distributions. The candidates are generally located around the Galactic center uniformly, with 68% (1-sigma) of them within approximately 8 kpc. We discuss that optical spectroscopy can be used to verify the C-rich AGB stars in our candidates, and they will be good targets for the LAMOST survey that is planned to start from fall of 2012.
  • A "pulsar timing array" (PTA), in which observations of a large sample of pulsars spread across the celestial sphere are combined, allows investigation of "global" phenomena such as a background of gravitational waves or instabilities in atomic timescales that produce correlated timing residuals in the pulsars of the array. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) is an implementation of the PTA concept based on observations with the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. A sample of 20 millisecond pulsars is being observed at three radio-frequency bands, 50cm (~700 MHz), 20cm (~1400 MHz) and 10cm (~3100 MHz), with observations at intervals of 2 - 3 weeks. Regular observations commenced in early 2005. This paper describes the systems used for the PPTA observations and data processing, including calibration and timing analysis. The strategy behind the choice of pulsars, observing parameters and analysis methods is discussed. Results are presented for PPTA data in the three bands taken between 2005 March and 2011 March. For ten of the 20 pulsars, rms timing residuals are less than 1 microsec for the best band after fitting for pulse frequency and its first time derivative. Significant "red" timing noise is detected in about half of the sample. We discuss the implications of these results on future projects including the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) and a PTA based on the Square Kilometre Array. We also present an "extended PPTA" data set that combines PPTA data with earlier Parkes timing data for these pulsars.
  • A "pulsar timing array" (PTA), in which observations of a large sample of pulsars spread across the celestial sphere are combined, allows investigation of "global" phenomena such as a background of gravitational waves or instabilities in atomic timescales that produce correlated timing residuals in the pulsars of the array. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) is an implementation of the PTA concept based on observations with the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. A sample of 20 millisecond pulsars is being observed at three radio-frequency bands, 50cm (~700 MHz), 20cm (~1400 MHz) and 10cm (~3100 MHz), with observations at intervals of 2 - 3 weeks. Regular observations commenced in early 2005. This paper describes the systems used for the PPTA observations and data processing, including calibration and timing analysis. The strategy behind the choice of pulsars, observing parameters and analysis methods is discussed. Results are presented for PPTA data in the three bands taken between 2005 March and 2011 March. For ten of the 20 pulsars, rms timing residuals are less than 1 microsec for the best band after fitting for pulse frequency and its first time derivative. Significant "red" timing noise is detected in about half of the sample. We discuss the implications of these results on future projects including the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) and a PTA based on the Square Kilometre Array. We also present an "extended PPTA" data set that combines PPTA data with earlier Parkes timing data for these pulsars.
  • We aim to investigate the relation between the long-term flux density and the position angle (PA) evolution of inner-jet in blazars. We have carried out the elliptic Gaussian model-fit to the `core' of 50 blazars from 15 GHz VLBA data, and analyzed the variability properties of three blazars from the model-fit results. Diverse correlations between the long-term peak flux density and the PA evolution of the major axis of the `core' have been found in $\sim$ 20% of the 50 sources. Of them, three typical blazars have been analyzed, which also show quasi-periodic flux variations of a few years (T). The correlation between the peak flux density and the PA of inner-jet is positive for S5~0716+714, and negative for S4~1807+698. The two sources cannot be explained with the ballistic jet models, the non-ballistic models have been analyzed to explain the two sub-luminal blazars. A correlation between the peak flux density and the PA (with a T/4 time lag) of inner-jet is found in [HB89]~1823+568, this correlation can be explained with a ballistic precession jet model. All the explanations are based mainly on the geometric beaming effect; physical flux density variations from the jet base would be considered for more complicated situations in future, which could account for the no or less significance of the correlation between the peak flux density and the PA of inner-jet in the majority blazars of our sample.
  • The recent Kepler discovery of KOI-152 reveals a system of three hot super-Earth candidates that are in or near a 4:2:1 mean motion resonance. It is unlikely that they formed in situ, the planets probably underwent orbital migration during the formation and evolution process. The small semimajor axes of the three planets suggest that migration stopped at the inner edge of the primordial gas disk. In this paper we focus on the influence of migration halting mechanisms, including migration "dead zones", and inner truncation by the stellar magnetic field. We show that the stellar accretion rate, stellar magnetic field and the speed of migration in the proto-planetary disk are the main factors affecting the final configuration of KOI-152. Our simulations suggest that three planets may be around a star with low star accretion rate or with high magnetic field. On the other hand, slow type I migration, which decreases to one tenth of the linear analysis results, favors forming the configuration of KOI-152. Under such formation scenario, the planets in the system are not massive enough to open gaps in the gas disk. The upper limit of the planetary masses are estimated to be about $15,~19$, and $24 M_\oplus$, respectively. Our results are also indicative of the near Laplacian configurations that are quite common in planetary systems.
  • The Damocloids are a group of unusual asteroids, recently enrolling a new member of 2010 EJ104. The dynamical evolution for the Damocloids may uncover a connection passage from the Main Belt, the Kuiper Belt and the scattered disk beyond. According to our simulations, two regions may be considered as possible origin of the Damocloids: the scattered disk, or a part of Oort cloud which will be perturbed to a transient region locating between 700 AU and 1000 AU. Based on the potential origin, the Damocloids can be classified into two types, with relation to their semi-major axes, and about 65.5% Damocloids is classified into type I which mainly originate from Oort cloud. Whether the Damocloids is inactive nuclei of Halley Family Comets may rely on their origin.
  • In this work, we extensively investigate the terrestrial planetary formation for the inclined planetary systems (considering the OGLE-2006-BLG-109L system as prototype) in the late stage. In the simulations, we show that the occurrence of terrestrial planets is quite common, in the final assembly stage. Moreover, we find that 40% of the runs finally occupy one planet in the habitable zone (HZ). On the other hand, the numerical results also indicate that the inner region of the planetesimal disk, ranging from $\sim 0.1$ to 0.3 AU, plays an important role in building up terrestrial planets. By examining all simulations, we note that the survivals are located either between 0.1$\sim$1.0 AU or beyond 7 AU, or at the 1:1 mean motion resonance of OGLE-2006-BLG-109Lb at $\sim$2.20 AU. The outcomes suggest that it may exist moderate possibility for the inclined systems to harbor terrestrial planets, even planets in the HZs.
  • We present results of a ^{12}CO J = 3-2 survey of 125 nearby galaxies obtained with the 10-m Heinrich-Hertz-Telescope, with the aim to characterize the properties of warm and dense molecular gas in a large variety of environments. With an angular resolution of 22'', ^{12}CO 3-2 emission was detected in 114 targets. Based on 61 galaxies observed with equal beam sizes the ^{12}CO 3-2/1-0 integrated line intensity ratio R_{31} is found to vary from 0.2 to 1.9, with an average value of 0.81. No correlations are found for R_{31} to Hubble type and far infrared luminosity. Possible indications for a correlation with inclination angle and the 60mum/100mum color temperature of the dust are not significant. Higher R_{31} ratios than in ``normal'' galaxies, hinting at enhanced molecular excitation, may be found in galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei. Even higher average values are determined for galaxies with bars or starbursts, the latter being identified by the ratio of infrared luminosity versus isophotal area, log[(L_{FIR}/L_{SUN})/(D_{25}/kpc)^2)] > 7.25. (U)LIRGs are found to have the highest averaged R_{31} value. This may be a consequence of particularly vigorous star formation activity, triggered by galaxy interaction and merger events. The nuclear CO luminosities are slightly sublinearly correlated with the global FIR luminosity in both the ^{12}CO J = 3-2 and the 1-0 lines. The slope of the log-log plots rises with compactness of the respective galaxy subsample, indicating a higher average density and a larger fraction of thermalized gas in distant luminous galaxies. While linear or sublinear correlations for the ^{12}CO J = 3-2 line can be explained, if the bulk of the observed J = 3-2 emission originates from molecular gas with densities below the critical one, the case of the ^{12}CO J = 1-0 line with its small critical density remains a puzzle.
  • In this work, we revisit the all-sky Galactic diffuse $\gamma$-ray emission taking into account the new measurements of cosmic ray electron/positron spectrum by PAMELA, ATIC and Fermi, which show excesses of cosmic electrons/positrons beyond the expected fluxes in the conventional model. Since the origins of the extra electrons/positrons are not clear, we consider three different scenarios to account for the excesses: the astrophysical sources such as the Galactic pulsars, dark matter decay and annihilation. Further, new results from Fermi-LAT of the (extra-)Galactic diffuse $\gamma$-ray are adopted. The background cosmic rays without the new sources give lower diffuse $\gamma$ rays compared to Fermi-LAT observation, which is consistent with previous analysis. The scenario with astrophysical sources predicts diffuse $\gamma$-rays with little difference with the background. The dark matter annihilation models with $\tau^{\pm}$ final state are disfavored by the Fermi diffuse $\gamma$-ray data, while there are only few constraints on the decaying dark matter scenario. Furthermore, these is always a bump at higher energies ($\sim$ TeV) of the diffuse $\gamma$-ray spectra for the dark matter scenarios due to final state radiation. Finally we find that the Fermi-LAT diffuse $\gamma$-ray data can be explained by simply enlarging the normalization of the electron spectrum without introduce any new sources, which may indicate that the current constraints on the dark matter models can be much stronger given a precise background estimate.
  • We investigate the formation of terrestrial planets in the late stage of planetary formation using two-planet model. At that time, the protostar has formed for about 3 Myr and the gas disk has dissipated. In the model, the perturbations from Jupiter and Saturn are considered. We also consider variations of the mass of outer planet, and the initial eccentricities and inclinations of embryos and planetesimals. Our results show that, terrestrial planets are formed in 50 Myr, and the accretion rate is about 60% - 80%. In each simulation, 3 - 4 terrestrial planets are formed inside "Jupiter" with masses of $0.15 - 3.6 M_{\oplus}$. In the 0.5 - 4AU, when the eccentricities of planetesimals are excited, planetesimals are able to accrete material from wide radial direction. The plenty of water material of the terrestrial planet in the Habitable Zone may be transferred from the farther places by this mechanism. Accretion may also happen a few times between two giant planets only if the outer planet has a moderate mass and the small terrestrial planet could survive at some resonances over time scale of $10^8$ yr.
  • A diversity of resonance configurations may be formed under different migration of two giant planets. And the researchers show that the HD 128311 and HD 73526 planetary systems are involved in a 2:1 mean motion resonance but not in apsidal corotation, because one of the resonance argument circulates over the dynamical evolution. In this paper, we investigate potential mechanisms to form the 2:1 librating-circulating resonance configuration. In the late stage of planetary formation, scattering or colliding among planetesimals and planetary embryos can frequently occur. Hence, in our model, we consider a planetary configuration of two giants together with few terrestrial planets. We find that both colliding or scattering events at very early stage of dynamical evolution can influence the configurations trapped into resonance. A planet-planet scattering of a moderate terrestrial planet, or multiple scattering of smaller planets in a crowded planetary system can change the resonant configuration. In addition, collision or merging can alter the masses and location of the giant planets, which also play an important role in shaping the resonant configuration during the dynamical evolution. In this sense, the librating-circulating resonance configuration is more likely to form by a hybrid mechanism of scattering and collision.
  • Double-peaked [O III]5007, profiles in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) may provide evidence for the existence of dual AGNs, but a good diagnostic for selecting them is currently lacking. Starting from $\sim$ 7000 active galaxies in SDSS DR7, we assemble a sample of 87 type 2 AGNs with double-peaked [O III]5007, profiles. The nuclear obscuration in the type 2 AGNs allows us to determine redshifts of host galaxies through stellar absorption lines. We typically find that one peak is redshifted and another is blueshifted relative to the host galaxy. We find a strong correlation between the ratios of the shifts and the double peak fluxes. The correlation can be naturally explained by the Keplerian relation predicted by models of co-rotating dual AGNs. The current sample statistically favors that most of the [O III] double-peaked sources are dual AGNs and disfavors other explanations, such as rotating disk and outflows. These dual AGNs have a separation distance at $\sim 1$ kpc scale, showing an intermediate phase of merging systems. The appearance of dual AGNs is about $\sim 10^{-2}$, impacting on the current observational deficit of binary supermassive black holes with a probability of $\sim 10^{-4}$ (Boroson & Lauer).
  • The fast variability of energetic TeV photons from the center of M87 has been detected, offering a new clue to estimate spins of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We extend the study of Wang et al. (2008) by including all of general relativistic effects. We numerically solve the full set of relativistic hydrodynamical equations of the radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs) and then obtain the radiation fields around the black hole. The optical depth of the radiation fields to TeV photons due to pair productions are calculated in the Kerr metric. We find that the optical depth strongly depends on: (1) accretion rates as $\tautev\propto \dot{M}^{2.5-5.0}$; (2) black hole spins; and (3) location of the TeV source. Jointly considering the optical depth and the spectral energy distribution radiated from the RIAFs, the strong degeneration of the spin with the other free parameters in the RIAF model can be largely relaxed. We apply the present model to M87, wherein the RIAFs are expected to be at work, and find that the minimum specific angular momentum of the hole is $a\sim0.8$. The present methodology is applicable to M87-like sources with future detection of TeV emissions to constrain the spins of SMBHs.
  • The fast variability of energetic TeV photons from the center of M87 has been detected, offering a new clue to estimate spins of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We extend the study of Wang et al. (2008) by including all of general relativistic effects. We numerically solve the full set of relativistic hydrodynamical equations of the radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs) and then obtain the radiation fields around the black hole. The optical depth of the radiation fields to TeV photons due to pair productions are calculated in the Kerr metric. We find that the optical depth strongly depends on: (1) accretion rates as $\tautev\propto \dot{M}^{2.5-5.0}$; (2) black hole spins; and (3) location of the TeV source. Jointly considering the optical depth and the spectral energy distribution radiated from the RIAFs, the strong degeneration of the spin with the other free parameters in the RIAF model can be largely relaxed. We apply the present model to M87, wherein the RIAFs are expected to be at work, and find that the minimum specific angular momentum of the hole is $a\sim0.8$. The present methodology is applicable to M87-like sources with future detection of TeV emissions to constrain the spins of SMBHs.
  • The fast variability of energetic TeV photons from the center of M87 has been detected, offering a new clue to estimate spins of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We extend the study of Wang et al. (2008) by including all of general relativistic effects. We numerically solve the full set of relativistic hydrodynamical equations of the radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs) and then obtain the radiation fields around the black hole. The optical depth of the radiation fields to TeV photons due to pair productions are calculated in the Kerr metric. We find that the optical depth strongly depends on: (1) accretion rates as $\tautev\propto \dot{M}^{2.5-5.0}$; (2) black hole spins; and (3) location of the TeV source. Jointly considering the optical depth and the spectral energy distribution radiated from the RIAFs, the strong degeneration of the spin with the other free parameters in the RIAF model can be largely relaxed. We apply the present model to M87, wherein the RIAFs are expected to be at work, and find that the minimum specific angular momentum of the hole is $a\sim0.8$. The present methodology is applicable to M87-like sources with future detection of TeV emissions to constrain the spins of SMBHs.
  • In fully general relativity, we calculate the images of the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) surrounding a Kerr black hole with arbitrary spins, inclination angles, and observational wavelengths. For the same initial conditions, such as the fixed accretion rate, it is found that the intrinsic size and radiation intensity of the images become larger, but the images become more compact in the inner region, while the size of the black hole shadow decreases with the increase of the black hole spin. With the increase of the inclination angles, the shapes of the black hole shadows change and become smaller, even disappear at all due to the obscuration by the thick disks. For median inclination angles, the radial velocity observed at infinity is larger because of both the rotation and radial motion of the fluid in the disk, which results in the luminous part of the images is much brighter. For larger inclination angles, such as the disk is edge on, the emission becomes dimmer at longer observational wavelengths (such as at 7.0mm and 3.5mm wavelengths), or brighter at shorter observational wavelengths (such as at 1.3 mm wavelength) than that of the face on case, except for the high spin and high inclination images. These complex behaviors are due to the combination of the Lorentz boosting effect and the radiative absorption in the disk. We hope our results are helpful to determine the spin parameter of the black hole in low luminosity sources, such as the Galactic center. A primary analysis by comparison with the observed sizes of Sgr A* at millimeters strongly suggests that the disk around the central black hole at Sgr A* is highly inclined or the central black hole is rotating fast.
  • In fully general relativity, we calculate the images of the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) surrounding a Kerr black hole with arbitrary spins, inclination angles, and observational wavelengths. For the same initial conditions, such as the fixed accretion rate, it is found that the intrinsic size and radiation intensity of the images become larger, but the images become more compact in the inner region, while the size of the black hole shadow decreases with the increase of the black hole spin. With the increase of the inclination angles, the shapes of the black hole shadows change and become smaller, even disappear at all due to the obscuration by the thick disks. For median inclination angles, the radial velocity observed at infinity is larger because of both the rotation and radial motion of the fluid in the disk, which results in the luminous part of the images is much brighter. For larger inclination angles, such as the disk is edge on, the emission becomes dimmer at longer observational wavelengths (such as at 7.0mm and 3.5mm wavelengths), or brighter at shorter observational wavelengths (such as at 1.3 mm wavelength) than that of the face on case, except for the high spin and high inclination images. These complex behaviors are due to the combination of the Lorentz boosting effect and the radiative absorption in the disk. We hope our results are helpful to determine the spin parameter of the black hole in low luminosity sources, such as the Galactic center. A primary analysis by comparison with the observed sizes of Sgr A* at millimeters strongly suggests that the disk around the central black hole at Sgr A* is highly inclined or the central black hole is rotating fast.
  • We report results based on the monitoring of the BL Lac object Mrk 501 in the optical (B, V and R) passbands from March to May 2000. Observations spread over 12 nights were carried out using 1.2 meter Mount Abu Telescope, India and 61 cm Telescope at Sobaeksan Astronomy Observatory, South Korea. The aim is to study the intra-day variability (IDV), short term variability and color variability in the low state of the source. We have detected flux variation of 0.05 mag in the R-band in time scale of 15 min in one night. In the B and V passbands, we have less data points and it is difficult to infer any IDVs. Short term flux variations are also observed in the V and R bands during the observing run. No significant variation in color (B$-$R) has been detected but (V$-$R) shows variation during the present observing run. Assuming the shortest observed time scale of variability (15 min) to represent the disk instability or pulsation at a distance of 5 Schwarschild radii from the black hole (BH), mass of the central BH is estimated $\sim$ 1.20 $\times$ 10$^{8} M_{\odot}$.
  • We selected a sample of a dozen blazars which are the prime candidates for simultaneous multi-wavelength observing campaigns in their outburst phase. We searched for optical outbursts, intra-day variability and short term variability in these blazars. We carried out optical photometric monitoring of nine of these blazars in 13 observing nights during our observing run October 27, 2006 - March 20, 2007 by using the 1.02 meter optical telescope. From our observations, our data favor the hypothesis that three blazars were in the outburst state; one blazar was in the post outburst state; three blazars were in the pre/post outburst state; one blazar was in the low-state; and the state of one blazar was not known because there is not much optical data available for the blazar to compare with our observations. Out of three nights of observations of AO 0235+164, intra-day variability was detected in two nights. Out of five nights of observations of S5 0716+714, intra-day variability was detected in two nights. In one night of observations of PKS 0735+178, intra-day variability was detected. Out of six nights of observations of 3C 454.3, intra-day variability was detected in three nights. No intra-day variability was detected in S2 0109+224, OJ 287, ON 231, 3C 279 and 1ES 2344+514 in their 1, 4, 1, 2 and 1 nights of observations respectively. AO 0235+164, S5 0716+714, OJ 287, 3C 279 and 3C 454.3 were observed in more than one night and short term variations in all these blazars were also noticed. From our observations and the available data, we found that the predicted optical outburst with the time interval of ~ 8 years in AO 0235+164 and ~ 3 years in S5 0716+714 have possibly occurred.
  • We investigate the secular resonances for massless small bodies and Earth-like planets in several planetary systems. We further compare the results with those of Solar System. For example, in the GJ 876 planetary system, we show that the secular resonances $\nu_1$ and $\nu_2$ (respectively, resulting from the inner and outer giant planets) can excite the eccentricities of the Earth-like planets with orbits 0.21 AU $\leq a <$ 0.50 AU and eject them out of the system in a short timescale. However, in a dynamical sense, the potential zones for the existence of Earth-like planets are in the area 0.50 AU $\leq a \leq$ 1.00 AU, and there exist all stable orbits last up to $10^5$ yr with low eccentricities. For other systems, e.g., 47 UMa, we also show that the Habitable Zones for Earth-like planets are related to both secular resonances and mean motion resonances in the systems.
  • It is argued that there is a linear correlation between star formation rate (SFR) and accretion rate for normal bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs). However, it is still unclear whether this correlation holds for LINERs, of which the accretion rates are relatively lower than those of normal bright AGNs. The radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs) are believed to be present in these LINERs. In this work, we derive accretion rates for a sample of LINERs from their hard X-ray luminosities based on spectral calculations for RIAFs. We find that LINERs follow the same correlation between star formation rate and accretion rate defined by normal bright AGNs, when reasonable parameters are adopted for RIAFs. It means that the gases feed the black hole and star formation in these low-luminosity LINERs may follow the same way as that in normal bright AGNs, which is roughly consistent with recent numerical simulations on quasar evolution.