• Single-zone synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton models are widely used to explain broad-band Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of blazars from infrared to gamma-rays. These models bear obvious similarities to the homogeneous synchrotron cloud model which is often applied to explain radio emission from individual components of parsec-scale radio jets. The parsec-scale core, typically the brightest and most compact feature of blazar radio jet, could be the source of high-energy emission. We report on ongoing work to test this hypothesis by deriving the physical properties of parsec-scale radio emitting regions of twenty bright Fermi blazars using dedicated 5-43 GHz VLBA observations and comparing these parameters to results of SED modeling.
  • We discuss acceleration measurements for a large sample of extragalactic radio jets from the MOJAVE program which studies the parsec-scale jet structure and kinematics of a complete, flux-density-limited sample of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Accelerations are measured from the apparent motion of individual jet features or "components" which may represent patterns in the jet flow. We find that significant accelerations are common both parallel and perpendicular to the observed component velocities. Parallel accelerations, representing changes in apparent speed, are generally larger than perpendicular acceleration that represent changes in apparent direction. The trend for larger parallel accelerations indicates that a significant fraction of these changes in apparent speed are due to changes in intrinsic speed of the component rather than changes in direction to the line of sight. We find an overall tendency for components with increasing apparent speed to be closer to the base of their jets than components with decreasing apparent speed. This suggests a link between the observed pattern motions and the underlying flow which, in some cases, may increase in speed close to the base and decrease in speed further out; however, common hydro-dynamical processes for propagating shocks may also play a role. About half of the components show "non-radial" motion, or a misalignment between the component's structural position angle and its velocity direction, and these misalignments generally better align the component motion with the downstream emission. Perpendicular accelerations are closely linked with non-radial motion. When observed together, perpendicular accelerations are usually in the correct direction to have caused the observed misalignment.
  • We have compared the radio emission from a sample of parsec-scale AGN jets as measured by the VLBA at 15 GHz, with their associated gamma-ray properties that are reported in the Fermi LAT 3-month bright source list. We find in our radio-selected sample that the gamma-ray photon flux correlates well with the quasi-simultaneously measured compact radio flux density. The LAT-detected jets in our radio-selected complete sample generally have higher compact radio flux densities, and their parsec-scale cores are brighter (i.e., have higher brightness temperature) than the jets in the LAT non-detected objects. This suggests that the jets of bright gamma-ray AGN have preferentially higher Doppler-boosting factors. In addition, AGN jets tend to be found in a more active radio state within several months from LAT-detection of their strong gamma-ray emission. This result becomes more pronounced for confirmed gamma-ray flaring sources. We identify the parsec-scale radio core as a likely location for both the gamma-ray and radio flares, which appear within typical timescales of up to a few months of each other.
  • The radio loud galaxy NGC 1052 is being studied in an intensive multi-band campaign including X-ray brigthness monitoring and spectroscopic observations, single-dish radio brightness monitoring at centimetre wavelengths, and a high-frequency very-long-baseline interferometry monitoring program. Here we present a progress report on our studies from this program. The final goal of our observations is to relate the findings from the high-resolution radio images with the observed variations in the X-ray regime, to address the accretion processes and their relationship with the radio jet activity.