• Recent results have suggested that there is tension between the Gaia DR1 TGAS distances and the distances obtained using luminosities determined by eclipsing binaries or asteroseismology on red giant stars. We use the $K_s$-band luminosities of red clump stars, identified and characterized by asteroseismology, to make independent distance estimates. Our results suggest that Gaia TGAS distances contain a systematic error that decreases with increasing distance. We propose a correction to mitigate this offset as a function of parallax that is valid for the Kepler field and values of parallax that are less than ${\sim} 1.6 \rm \, mas$. For parallaxes greater than this we find agreement with previously published values. We note that the TGAS distances to the red clump stars of the open cluster M67 show a high level of disagreement that is difficult to correct for.
  • With the loss of a second reaction wheel, resulting in the inability to point continuously and stably at the same field of view, the NASA Kepler satellite recently entered a new mode of observation known as the K2 mission. The data from this redesigned mission present a specific challenge; the targets systematically drift in position on a ~6 hour time scale, inducing a significant instrumental signal in the photometric time series --- this greatly impacts the ability to detect planetary signals and perform asteroseismic analysis. Here we detail our version of a reduction pipeline for K2 target pixel data, which automatically: defines masks for all targets in a given frame; extracts the target's flux- and position time series; corrects the time series based on the apparent movement on the CCD (either in 1D or 2D) combined with the correction of instrumental and/or planetary signals via the KASOC filter (Handberg & Lund 2014), thus rendering the time series ready for asteroseismic analysis; computes power spectra for all targets, and identifies potential contaminations between targets. From a test of our pipeline on a sample of targets from the K2 campaign 0, the recovery of data for multiple targets increases the amount of potential light curves by a factor ${\geq}10$. Our pipeline could be applied to the upcoming TESS (Ricker et al. 2014) and PLATO 2.0 (Rauer et al. 2013) missions.