• Interferometric observations have demonstrated that a significant fraction of single-dish submillimetre (submm) sources are blends of multiple submm galaxies (SMGs), but the nature of this multiplicity, i.e. whether the galaxies are physically associated or chance projections, has not been determined. We performed spectroscopy of 11 SMGs in six multi-component submm sources, obtaining spectroscopic redshifts for nine of them. For an additional two component SMGs, we detected continuum emission but no obvious features. We supplement our observed sources with four sources from the literature. This sample allows us to statistically constrain the physical nature of single-dish submm source multiplicity for the first time. In three [3/7, or 43 (-33/+39) per cent at 95% confidence] of the single-dish sources for which the nature of the blending is unambiguous, the components for which spectroscopic redshifts are available are physically associated, whereas 4/7 [57 (-39/+33) per cent] have at least one unassociated component. When components whose spectra exhibit continuum but no features and for which the photometric redshift is significantly different from the spectroscopic redshift of the other component are also considered, 6/9 [67 (-37/+26) per cent] of the single-dish sources are comprised of at least one unassociated component. The nature of the multiplicity of one single-dish source is ambiguous. We conclude that physically associated systems and chance projections both contribute to the multi-component single-dish submm source population. This result contradicts the conventional wisdom that bright submm sources are solely a result of merger-induced starbursts, as blending of unassociated galaxies is also important.
  • The total star formation budget of galaxies consists of the sum of the unobscured star formation, as observed in the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), together with the obscured component that is absorbed and re-radiated by dust grains in the infrared. We explore how the fraction of obscured star formation depends on stellar mass for mass-complete samples of galaxies at $0<z<2.5$. We combine GALEX and WISE photometry for SDSS-selected galaxies with the 3D-HST treasury program and Spitzer/MIPS 24$\mu$m photometry in the well-studied 5 extragalactic CANDELS fields. We find a strong dependence of the fraction of obscured star formation ($f_{\mathrm{obscured}}$=SFR$_{\mathrm{IR}}$/SFR$_{\mathrm{UV+IR}}$) on stellar mass, with remarkably little evolution in this fraction with redshift out to $z$=2.5. 50\% of star formation is obscured for galaxies with log(M/M$_{\odot}$)=9.4; although unobscured star formation dominates the budget at lower masses, there exists a tail of low mass extremely obscured star-forming galaxies at $z>1$. For log(M/M$_{\odot}$)$>$10.5, $>$90\% of star formation is obscured at all redshifts. We also show that at fixed total SFR, $f_{\mathrm{obscured}}$ is lower at higher redshift. At fixed mass, high-redshift galaxies are observed to have more compact sizes and much higher star formation rates, gas fractions and hence surface densities (implying higher dust obscuration), yet we observe no redshift evolution in $f_{\mathrm{obscured}}$ with stellar mass. This poses a challenge to theoretical models to reproduce, where the observed compact sizes at high redshift seem in tension with lower dust obscuration.
  • Recent literature suggests that there are two modes through which galaxies grow their stellar mass - a normal mode characterized by quasi-steady star formation, and a highly efficient starburst mode possibly triggered by stochastic events such as galaxy mergers. While these differences are established for extreme cases, the population of galaxies in-between these two regimes is poorly studied and it is not clear where the transition between these two modes of star formation occurs. We utilize ALMA observations of the CO J=3-2 line luminosity in a sample of 20 infrared luminous galaxies that lie in the intermediate range between normal and starburst galaxies at z ~ 0.25-0.6 in the COSMOS field to examine the gas content and star formation efficiency of these galaxies. We compare these quantities to the galaxies' deviation from the well-studied "main sequence" correlation between star formation rate and stellar mass (MS) and find that at log($SFR/SFR_{MS}$) < 0.6, a galaxy's distance to the main sequence is mostly driven by increased gas content, and not a more efficient star formation process.
  • We carried out targeted ALMA observations of 129 fields in the COSMOS region at 1.25 mm, detecting 152 galaxies at S/N$\geq$5 with an average continuum RMS of 150 $\mu$Jy. These fields represent a S/N-limited sample of AzTEC / ASTE sources with 1.1 mm S/N$\geq$4 over an area of 0.72 square degrees. Given ALMA's fine resolution and the exceptional spectroscopic and multiwavelength photometric data available in COSMOS, this survey allows us unprecedented power in identifying submillimeter galaxy counterparts and determining their redshifts through spectroscopic or photometric means. In addition to 30 sources with prior spectroscopic redshifts, we identified redshifts for 113 galaxies through photometric methods and an additional nine sources with lower limits, which allowed a statistically robust determination of the redshift distribution. We have resolved 33 AzTEC sources into multi-component systems and our redshifts suggest that nine are likely to be physically associated. Our overall redshift distribution peaks at $z\sim$2.0 with a high redshift tail skewing the median redshift to $\tilde{z}$=2.48$\pm$0.05. We find that brighter millimeter sources are preferentially found at higher redshifts. Our faintest sources, with S$_{1.25 \rm mm}$<1.25 mJy, have a median redshift of $\tilde{z}$=2.18$\pm$0.09, while the brightest sources, S$_{1.25 \rm mm}$>1.8 mJy, have a median redshift of $\tilde{z}$=3.08$\pm$0.17. After accounting for spectral energy distribution shape and selection effects these results are consistent with several previous submillimeter galaxy surveys, and moreover, support the conclusion that the submillimeter galaxy redshift distribution is sensitive to survey depth.
  • We examine the rest-frame ultra-violet (UV) properties of 10 [CII]$\lambda158\,{\rm \mu m}$$-$detected galaxies at $z\sim5.5$ in COSMOS using new HST/WFC3 near-infrared imaging. Together with pre-existing $158\,{\rm \mu m}-$continuum and [CII] line measurements by ALMA, we study their dust attenuation properties on the IRX-$\beta$ diagram, which connects the total dust emission ($\propto$ IRX=log($L_{FIR}/L_{1600}$)) to the line-of-sight dust column ($\propto\beta$). We find systematically bluer UV continuum spectral slopes ($\beta$) compared to previous low-resolution ground-based measurements, which relieves some of the tension between models of dust attenuation and observations at high redshifts. While most of the galaxies are consistent with local starburst or Small Magellanic cloud like dust properties, we find galaxies with low IRX values and a large range in $\beta$ that cannot be explained by models of a uniform dust distribution well mixed with stars. A stacking analysis of Keck/DEIMOS optical spectra indicates that these galaxies are metal-poor with young stellar populations which could significantly alter their spatial dust distribution.
  • We determine the physical properties of a sample of SMGs in the COSMOS field that were pre-selected at the observed wavelength of $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.1$ mm, and followed up at $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.3$ mm with ALMA. We used MAGPHYS to fit the panchromatic (ultraviolet to radio) SEDs of 124 of the target SMGs, 19.4% of which are spectroscopically confirmed. The SED analysis was complemented by estimating the gas masses of the SMGs by using the $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.3$ mm emission as a tracer of the molecular gas. The sample median and 16th-84th percentile ranges of the stellar masses, SFRs, dust temperatures, and dust and gas masses were derived to be $\log(M_{\star}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=11.09^{+0.41}_{-0.53}$, ${\rm SFR}=402^{+661}_{-233}$ ${\rm M}_{\odot}~{\rm yr}^{-1}$, $T_{\rm dust}=39.7^{+9.7}_{-7.4}$ K, $\log(M_{\rm dust}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=9.01^{+0.20}_{-0.31}$, and $\log(M_{\rm gas}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=11.34^{+0.20}_{-0.23}$, respectively. The median gas-to-dust ratio and gas fraction were found to be $120^{+73}_{-30}$ and $0.62^{+0.27}_{-0.23}$, respectively. We found that 57.3% of our SMGs populate the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies, while 41.9% of the sources lie above the MS by a factor of >3 (one source lies below the MS). The largest 3 GHz radio sizes are found among the MS sources. Those SMGs that appear irregular in the rest-frame UV are predominantly starbursts, while the MS SMGs are mostly disk-like. The larger radio-emitting sizes of the MS SMGs compared to starbursts is a likely indication of their more widespread, less intense star formation. The irregular UV morphologies of the starburst SMGs are likely to echo their merger nature. Our results suggest that the transition from high-$z$ SMGs to local ellipticals via compact, quiescent galaxies (cQGs) at $z \sim 2$ might not be universal, and the latter population might also descend from the so-called blue nuggets.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870um observations of 29 bright Herschel sources near high-redshift QSOs. The observations confirm that 20 of the Herschel sources are submillimeter-bright galaxies (SMGs) and identify 16 new SMG-QSO pairs that are useful to studies of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of SMGs. Eight out of the 20 SMGs are blends of multiple 870um sources. The angular separations for six of the Herschel-QSO pairs are less than 10", comparable to the sizes of the Herschel beam and the ALMA primary beam. We find that four of these six "pairs" are actually QSOs hosted by SMGs. No additional submillimeter companions are detected around these QSOs and the rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of the QSOs show no evidence of significant reddening. Black hole accretion and star formation contribute almost equally in bolometric luminosity in these galaxies. The SMGs hosting QSOs show similar source sizes, dust surface densities, and SFR surface densities as other SMGs in the sample. We find that the black holes are growing $\sim$3$\times$ faster than the galaxies when compared to the present-day black-hole-galaxy mass ratio, suggesting a QSO duty cycle of $\lesssim$30% in SMGs at z ~ 3. The remaining two Herschel-detected QSOs are undetected at 870um but each has an SMG "companion" only 9" and 12" away (71 and 95 kpc at z = 3). They could be either merging or projected pairs. If the former, they would represent a rare class of "wet-dry" mergers. If the latter, the QSOs would, for the first time, probe the CGM of SMGs at impact parameters below 100 kpc.
  • We determine the radio size distribution of a large sample of 152 SMGs in COSMOS that were detected with ALMA at 1.3 mm. For this purpose, we used the observations taken by the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project. One hundred and fifteen of the 152 target SMGs were found to have a 3 GHz counterpart. The median value of the major axis FWHM at 3 GHz is derived to be $4.6\pm0.4$ kpc. The radio sizes show no evolutionary trend with redshift, or difference between different galaxy morphologies. We also derived the spectral indices between 1.4 and 3 GHz, and 3 GHz brightness temperatures for the sources, and the median values were found to be $\alpha=-0.67$ and $T_{\rm B}=12.6\pm2$ K. Three of the target SMGs, which are also detected with the VLBA, show clearly higher brightness temperatures than the typical values. Although the observed radio emission appears to be predominantly powered by star formation and supernova activity, our results provide a strong indication of the presence of an AGN in the VLBA and X-ray-detected SMG AzTEC/C61. The median radio-emitting size we have derived is 1.5-3 times larger than the typical FIR dust-emitting sizes of SMGs, but similar to that of the SMGs' molecular gas component traced through mid-$J$ line emission of CO. The physical conditions of SMGs probably render the diffusion of cosmic-ray electrons inefficient, and hence an unlikely process to lead to the observed extended radio sizes. Instead, our results point towards a scenario where SMGs are driven by galaxy interactions and mergers. Besides triggering vigorous starbursts, galaxy collisions can also pull out the magnetised fluids from the interacting disks, and give rise to a taffy-like synchrotron-emitting bridge. This provides an explanation for the spatially extended radio emission of SMGs, and can also cause a deviation from the well-known IR-radio correlation.
  • The Universe's largest galaxy clusters likely built the majority of their massive $>10^{11} M_\odot$ galaxies in simultaneous, short-lived bursts of activity well before virialization. This conclusion is reached from emerging datasets on $z>2$ proto-clusters and the characteristics of their member galaxies, in particular, rare starbursts and ultraluminous active galactic nuclei (AGN). The most challenging observational hurdle in identifying such structures is their very large volumes, $\sim10^{4}$ comoving Mpc$^3$ at $z>2$, subtending areas $\sim$half a degree on the sky. Thus the contrast afforded by an overabundance of very rare galaxies in comparison to the background can more easily distinguish overdense structures from the surrounding, normal density field. Five $2<z<3$ proto-clusters from the literature are discussed in detail and are found to contain up to 12 dusty starbursts or luminous AGN galaxies each, a phenomenon that is unlikely to occur by chance even in overdense environments. Measurements of gas depletion times suggest that they are indeed short-lived on $\sim$100 Myr timescales, and the probability of finding a structure containing more than 8 such systems is $\sim$0.2\%, unless their `triggering' is correlated on very large spatial scales, $\sim$10 Mpc across. The volume density of starburst-rich proto-clusters is found to be comparable to all $>10^{15} M_\odot$ galaxy clusters in the nearby Universe, a factor of five larger than expected in some simulations. Some tension yet exists between measurements of their volume density of starburst-rich proto-clusters and the expectation that they are generated via short-lived episodes. However, improved observations of proto-clusters over large regions of sky will certainly shed more light on the assembly of galaxy clusters, and whether or not they build their galaxies through episodic bursts as suggested here. [abridged]
  • The Next-Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) will be critical for understanding how galaxies are built and evolve at the earliest epochs. The sensitivity and frequency coverage will allow for the detection of cold gas and dust in `normal' distant galaxies, including the low-J transitions of molecular gas tracers such as CO, HNC, and HCO+; synchrotron and free-free continuum emission; and even the exciting possibility of thermal dust emission at the highest (z~7) redshifts. In particular, by enabling the total molecular gas reservoirs to be traced to unprecedented sensitivities across a huge range of epochs simultaneously -- something no other radio or submillimeter facility will be capable of -- the detection of the crucial low-J transitions of CO in a diverse body of galaxies will be the cornerstone of ngVLA's contribution to high-redshift galaxy evolution science. The ultra-wide bandwidths will allow a complete sampling of radio SEDs, as well as the detection of emission lines necessary for spectroscopic confirmation of elusive dusty starbursts. The ngVLA will also deliver unique contributions to our understanding of cosmic magnetism and to science accessible through microwave polarimetry. Finally, the superb angular resolution will move the field beyond detection experiments and allow detailed studies of the morphology and dynamics of these systems, including dynamical modeling of disks/mergers, determining the properties of outflows, measuring black hole masses from gas disks, and resolving multiple AGN nuclei. We explore the contribution of a ngVLA to these areas and more, as well as synergies with current and upcoming facilities including ALMA, SKA, large single-dish submillimeter observatories, GMT/TMT, and JWST.
  • The relationship between galaxy star formation rates (SFR) and stellar masses ($M_\ast$) is re-examined using a mass-selected sample of $\sim$62,000 star-forming galaxies at $z \le 1.3$ in the COSMOS 2-deg$^2$ field. Using new far-infrared photometry from $Herschel$-PACS and SPIRE and $Spitzer$-MIPS 24 $\mu$m, along with derived infrared luminosities from the NRK method based on galaxies' locations in the restframe color-color diagram $(NUV - r)$ vs. $(r - K)$, we are able to more accurately determine total SFRs for our complete sample. At all redshifts, the relationship between median $SFR$ and $M_\ast$ follows a power-law at low stellar masses, and flattens to nearly constant SFR at high stellar masses. We describe a new parameterization that provides the best fit to the main sequence and characterizes the low mass power-law slope, turnover mass, and overall scaling. The turnover in the main sequence occurs at a characteristic mass of about $M_{0} \sim 10^{10} M_{\odot}$ at all redshifts. The low mass power-law slope ranges from 0.9-1.3 and the overall scaling rises in SFR as a function of $(1+z)^{4.12 \pm 0.10}$. A broken power-law fit below and above the turnover mass gives relationships of $SFR \propto M_{*}^{0.88 \pm 0.06}$ below the turnover mass and $SFR \propto M_{*}^{0.27 \pm 0.04}$ above the turnover mass. Galaxies more massive than $M_\ast \gtrsim 10^{10}\ M_{\rm \odot}$ have on average, a much lower specific star formation rate (sSFR) than would be expected by simply extrapolating the traditional linear fit to the main sequence found for less massive galaxies.
  • We present stringent constraints on the average mid-, far-infrared and radio emissions of $\sim$14200 quiescent galaxies (QGs), identified out to $z=3$ in the COSMOS field via their rest-frame NUV$-$r and r$-$J colors, and with stellar masses $M_{\star}=10^{9.8-12.2} \,M_{\odot} $. Stacking in deep Spitzer (MIPS $24\,\mu$m), Herschel (PACS and SPIRE), and VLA (1.4 GHz) maps reveals extremely low dust-obscured star formation rates for QGs (SFR $<0.1-3\,M_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$ at $z \leqslant 2$ and $<6-18\,M_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$ at $z > 2$), consistent with the low unobscured SFRs ($<0.01-1.2\,M_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$) inferred from modeling their ultraviolet-to-near-infrared photometry. The average SFRs of QGs are $>10\times$ below those of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) within the $M_{\star}$- and $z$-ranges considered. The stacked 1.4 GHz signals (S/N $> 5$) are, if attributed solely to star formation, in excess of the total (obscured plus unobscured) SFR limits, suggestive of a widespread presence of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN) among QGs. Our results reaffirm the existence of a significant population QGs out to $z = 3$, thus corroborating the need for powerful quenching mechanism(s) to terminate star formation in galaxies at earlier epochs.
  • Far-infrared and submillimeter wavelength surveys have now established the important role of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) in the assembly of stellar mass and the evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. The brightest of these galaxies have infrared luminosities in excess of 10$^{13}$ L$_{\odot}$ with implied star-formation rates of thousands of solar masses per year. They represent the most intense starbursts in the Universe, yet many are completely optically obscured. Their easy detection at submm wavelengths is due to dust heated by ultraviolet radiation of newly forming stars. When summed up, all of the dusty, star-forming galaxies in the Universe produce an infrared radiation field that has an equal energy density as the direct starlight emission from all galaxies visible at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths. The bulk of this infrared extragalactic background light emanates from galaxies as diverse as gas-rich disks to mergers of intense starbursting galaxies. Major advances in far-infrared instrumentation in recent years, both space-based and ground-based, has led to the detection of nearly a million DSFGs, yet our understanding of the underlying astrophysics that govern the start and end of the dusty starburst phase is still in nascent stage. This review is aimed at summarizing the current status of DSFG studies, focusing especially on the detailed characterization of the best-understood subset (submillimeter galaxies, who were summarized in the last review of this field over a decade ago, Blain et al., 2002), but also the selection and characterization of more recently discovered DSFG populations. We review DSFG population statistics, their physical properties including dust, gas and stellar contents, their environments, and current theoretical models related to the formation and evolution of these galaxies.
  • We investigate the claim that all dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) reside within halos that share a common, universal mass profile as has been derived for dSphs of the Galaxy. By folding in kinematic information for 25 Andromeda dSphs, more than doubling the previous sample size, we find that a singular mass profile can not be found to fit all the observations well. Further, the best-fit dark matter density profile measured for solely the Milky Way dSphs is marginally discrepant (at just beyond the 1 sigma level) with that of the Andromeda dSphs, where a profile with lower maximum circular velocity, and hence mass, is preferred. The agreement is significantly better when three extreme Andromeda outliers, And XIX, XXI and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (>600pc) and low velocity dispersions (sigma_v < 5km/s) are omitted from the sample. We argue that the unusual properties of these outliers are likely caused by tidal interactions with the host galaxy.
  • We combine Herschel PACS and SPIRE maps of the full 2 deg^2 COSMOS field with existing multi-wavelength data to obtain template and model-independent optical-to-far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 4,218 Herschel-selected sources with log(L_IR/L_sun) = 9.4-13.6 and z = 0.02-3.54. Median SEDs are created by binning the optical to far-infrared (FIR) bands available in COSMOS as a function of infrared luminosity. Herschel probes rest-frame wavelengths where the bulk of the infrared radiation is emitted, allowing us to more accurately determine fundamental dust properties of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies. We find that the SED peak wavelength (lambda_peak) decreases and the dust mass (M_dust) increases with increasing total infrared luminosity (L_IR). In the lowest infrared luminosity galaxies (log(L_IR/L_sun) = 10.0-11.5), we see evidence of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) features (lambda=7-9 um), while in the highest infrared luminosity galaxies (L_IR > 10^12 L_sun) we see an increasing contribution of hot dust and/or power-law emission, consistent with the presence of heating from an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We study the relationship between stellar mass and star formation rate of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies and find no evidence that Herschel-selected galaxies follow the SFR/M_* "main sequence" as previously determined from studies of optically selected, star-forming galaxies. Finally, we compare the mid-infrared (MIR) to FIR properties of our infrared luminous galaxies using the previously defined diagnostic, IR8 = L_IR / L_8, and find that galaxies with L_IR > 10^11.3 L_sun tend to systematically lie above (~3-5) the IR8 "infrared main sequence", suggesting either suppressed PAH emission or an increasing contribution from AGN heating.
  • We present deep 450um and 850um observations of a large, uniformly covered 394arcmin^2 area in the COSMOS field obtained with the SCUBA-2 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). We achieve root-mean-square noise values of 4.13mJy at 450um and 0.80mJy at 850um. The differential and cumulative number counts are presented and compared to similar previous works. Individual point sources are identified at >3.6sigma significance, a threshold corresponding to a 3-5% sample contamination rate. We identify 78 sources at 450um and 99 at 850um, with flux densities S450=13-37mJy and S850=2-16mJy. Only 62-76% of 450um sources are 850um detected and 61-81% of 850um sources are 450um detected. The positional uncertainties at 450um are small (1-2.5") and therefore allow a precise identification of multiwavelength counterparts without reliance on detection at 24um or radio wavelengths; we find that only 44% of 450um-selected galaxies and 60% of 850um-sources have 24um or radio counterparts. 450um-selected galaxies peak at <z>=1.95+-0.19 and 850um=selected galaxies peak at <z>=2.16+-0.11. The two samples occupy similar parameter space in redshift and luminosity, while their median SED peak wavelengths differ by ~10-50um (translating to deltaTdust =8-12K, where 450um-selected galaxies are warmer). The similarities of the 450um and 850um populations, yet lack of direct overlap between them, suggests that submillimeter surveys conducted at any single far-infrared wavelength will be significantly incomplete (~>30%) at censusing infrared-luminous star formation at high-z.
  • We present the results from a large 850 micron survey of the sigma Orionis cluster using the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The 0.5-degree diameter circular region we surveyed contains 297 young stellar objects with an age estimated at about 3Myr. We detect 9 of these objects, 8 of which have infrared excesses from an inner disc. We also serendipitously detect 3 non-stellar sources at > 5sigma that are likely background submillimetre galaxies. The 9 detected stars have inferred disc masses ranging from 5 to about 17MJup, assuming similar dust properties as Taurus discs and an ISM gas-to-dust ratio of 100. There is a net positive signal toward the positions of the individually undetected infrared excess sources indicating a mean disc mass of 0.5 MJup . Stacking the emission toward those stars without infrared excesses constrains their mean disc mass to less than 0.3MJup, or an equivalent Earth mass in dust. The submillimetre luminosity distribution is significantly different from that in the younger Taurus region, indicating disc mass evolution as star forming regions age and the infrared excess fraction decreases. Submillimeter Array observations reveal CO emission toward 4 sources demonstrating that some, but probably not much, molecular gas remains in these relatively evolved discs. These observations provide new constraints on the dust and gas mass of protoplanetary discs during the giant planet building phase and provide a reference level for future studies of disc evolution.
  • We present a homogeneous kinematic analysis of red giant branch stars within 18 of the 28 Andromeda dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, obtained using the Keck I LRIS and Keck II DEIMOS spectrographs. Based on their g-i colors (taken with the CFHT MegaCam imager), physical positions on the sky, and radial velocities, we assign probabilities of dSph membership to each observed star. Using this information, the velocity dispersions, central masses and central densities of the dark matter halos are calculated for these objects, and compared with the properties of the Milky Way dSph population. We also measure the average metallicity ([Fe/H]) from the co-added spectra of member stars for each M31 dSph and find that they are consistent with the trend of decreasing [Fe/H] with luminosity observed in the Milky Way population. We find that three of our studied M31 dSphs appear as significant outliers in terms of their central velocity dispersion, And XIX, XXI and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (>700 pc) and low velocity dispersions (sigma_v<5 km/s). In addition, And XXV has a mass-to-light ratio within its half-light radius of just [M/L]_{half}=10.3^{+7.0}_{-6.7}, making it consistent with a simple stellar system with no appreciable dark matter component within its 1 sigma uncertainties. We suggest that the structure of the dark matter halos of these outliers have been significantly altered by tides.
  • We present the first analysis of the all-sky Swift BAT ultra hard X-ray (14-195 keV) data for a targeted list of objects. We find the BAT data can be studied at 3x fainter limits than in previous blind detection catalogs based on prior knowledge of source positions and using smaller energy ranges for source detection. We determine the AGN fraction in 134 nearby (z<0.05) luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGS) from the GOALS sample. We find that LIRGs have a higher detection frequency than galaxies matched in stellar mass and redshift at 14-195 keV and 24-35 keV. In agreement with work at other wavelengths, the AGN detection fraction increases strongly at high IR luminosity with half of high luminosity LIRGs (50%, 6/12, log L_IR/L_sun>11.8) detected. The BAT AGN classification shows 97% (37/38) agreement with Chandra and XMM AGN classification using hardness ratios or detection of a iron K-alpha line. This confirms our statistical analysis and supports the use of the Swift BAT all-sky survey to study fainter populations of any category of sources in the ultra hard X-ray band. BAT AGN in LIRGs tend to show higher column densities with 40\pm9% showing 14-195 keV/2-10 keV hardness flux ratios suggestive of high or Compton-thick column densities (log N_H>24 cm^-2), compared to only 12\pm5% of non-LIRG BAT AGN. We also find that using specific energy ranges of the BAT detector can yield additional sources over total band detections with 24% (5/21) of detections in LIRGs at 24-35 keV not detected at 14-195 keV.
  • We present the results of SCUBA2 observations at 450 micron and 850 micron of the field lensed by the massive cluster A370. With a total survey area > 100 arcmin2 and 1 sigma sensitivities of 3.92 and 0.82 mJy/beam at 450 and 850 micron respectively, we find a secure sample of 20 sources at 450 micron and 26 sources at 850 micron with a signal-to-noise ratio > 4. Using the latest lensing model of A370 and Monte Carlo simulations, we derive the number counts at both wavelengths. The 450 micron number counts probe a factor of four deeper than the counts recently obtained from the Herschel Space Telescope at similar wavelengths, and we estimate that ~47-61% of the 450 micron extragalactic background light (EBL) resolved into individual sources with 450 micron fluxes greater than 4.5 mJy. The faint 450 micron sources in the 4 sigma sample have positional accuracies of 3 arcseconds, while brighter sources (signal-to-noise > 6 sigma) are good to 1.4 arcseconds. Using the deep radio map (1 sigma ~ 6 uJy) we find that the percentage of submillimeter sources having secure radio counterparts is 85% for 450 micron sources with intrinsic fluxes > 6 mJy and 67% for 850 micron sources with intrinsic fluxes > 4 mJy. We also find that 67% of the > 4 sigma 450 micron sources are detected at 850 micron, while the recovery rate at 450 micron of > 4 sigma 850 micron sources is 54%. Combined with the source redshifts estimated using millimetric flux ratios, the recovered rate is consistent with the scenario where both 450 micron and 20 cm emission preferentially select lower redshift dusty sources, while 850 micron emission traces a higher fraction of dusty sources at higher redshifts. [Abridge]
  • Luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are the most extreme star forming galaxies in the universe. The local (U)LIRGs provide a unique opportunity to study their multi-wavelength properties in detail for comparison to their more numerous counterparts at high redshifts. We present common large aperture photometry at radio through X-ray wavelengths, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for a sample of 53 nearby LIRGs and 11 ULIRGs spanning log (LIR/Lsun) = 11.14-12.57 from the flux-limited Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The SEDs for all objects are similar in that they show a broad, thermal stellar peak and a dominant FIR thermal dust peak, where nuLnu(60um) / nuLnu(V) increases from ~2-30 with increasing LIR. When normalized at IRAS-60um, the largest range in the luminosity ratio, R(lambda)=log[nuLnu(lambda)/nuLnu(60um)] observed over the full sample is seen in the Hard X-rays (HX=2-10 keV). A small range is found in the Radio (1.4GHz), where the mean ratio is largest. Total infrared luminosities, LIR(8-1000um), dust temperatures, and dust masses were computed from fitting thermal dust emission modified blackbodies to the mid-infrared (MIR) through submillimeter SEDs. The new results reflect an overall ~0.02 dex lower luminosity than the original IRAS values. Total stellar masses were computed by fitting stellar population synthesis models to the observed near-infrared (NIR) through ultraviolet (UV) SEDs. Mean stellar masses are found to be log(M/Msun) = 10.79+/-0.40. Star formation rates have been determined from the infrared (SFR_IR~45Msun/yr) and from the monochromatic UV luminosities (SFR_UV~1.3Msun/yr), respectively. Multiwavelength AGN indicators have be used to select putative AGN: about 60% of the ULIRGs would have been classified as an AGN by at least one of the selection criteria.
  • Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) fitting in the far-infrared (FIR) is greatly limited by a dearth of data and an excess of free parameters - from galaxies' dust composition, temperature, mass, orientation, opacity, to heating from AGN. This paper presents a simple FIR SED fitting technique joining a modified, single dust temperature greybody, representing the reprocessed starburst emission in the whole galaxy, to a mid-infrared powerlaw, which approximates hot-dust emission from AGN heating or clumpy, hot starbursting regions. This FIR SED can be used to measure infrared luminosities, dust temperatures and dust masses for both local and high-z galaxies with 3 to 10+ FIR photometric measurements. This fitting method is compared to infrared template SEDs in the literature using photometric data on 65 local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies, (U)LIRGs. Despite relying only on 2-4 free parameters, the coupled greybody/powerlaw SED fitting described here produces better fits to photometric measurements than best-fit literature template SEDs (with residuals a factor of ~2 lower). A mean emissivity index of beta=1.60+-0.38 and mid-infrared powerlaw slope of alpha=2.0+-0.5 is measured; the former agrees with the widely presumed emissivity index of beta=1.5 and the latter is indicative of an optically-thin dust medium with a shallow radial density profile, ~r^-0.5. Adopting characteristic dust temperature as the inverse wavelength where the SED peaks, dust temperatures ~25-45K are measured for local (U)LIRGs, ~5-15K colder than previous estimates using only simple greybodies. This comparative study highlights the impact of SED fitting assumptions on the measurement of physical properties such as infrared luminosity (and thereby infrared-based star formation rate), dust temperature and dust mass, for both local and high-redshift galaxies. [abridged]
  • We present high spatial resolution MERLIN 1.4GHz radio observations of two high redshift (z~2) sources, RGJ123623 (HDF147) and RGJ123617 (HDF130), selected as the brightest radio sources from a sample of submillimetre-faint radio galaxies. They have starburst classifications from their rest-frame UV spectra. However, their radio morphologies are remarkably compact (<80mas and <65mas respectively), demanding that the radio luminosity be dominated by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) rather than starbursts. Near-IR imaging (HST NICMOS F160W) shows large scale sizes (R_(1/2)~0.75", diameters ~12kpc) and SED fitting to photometric points (optical through the mid-IR) reveals massive (~5x10^(11) M_sun), old (a few Gyr) stellar populations. Both sources have low flux densities at observed 24um and are undetected in observed 70um and 850um, suggesting a low mass of interstellar dust. They are also formally undetected in the ultra-deep 2Ms Chandra data, suggesting that any AGN activity is likely intrinsically weak. We suggest both galaxies have evolved stellar populations, low star formation rates, and low accretion rates onto massive black holes (10^(8.6) M_sun) whose radio luminosity is weakly beamed (by factors of a few). A cluster-like environment has been identified near HDF130 by an over-density of galaxies at z=1.99, reinforcing the claim that clusters lead to more rapid evolution in galaxy populations. These observations suggest that high-resolution radio (MERLIN) can be a superb diagnostic tool of AGN in the diverse galaxy populations at z~2.
  • This submission has been withdrawn.
  • This is the first measurement and detection of coherence in the intergalactic medium (IGM) at substantially high redshift (z~3.8) and on large physical scales (~2.5 h^-1 Mpc). We perform the measurement by presenting new observations from Keck LRIS of the high redshift quasar pair PC 1643+4631A, B and their Ly-alpha absorber coincidences. This experiment extends multiple sightline quasar absorber studies to higher redshift, higher opacity, larger transverse separation, and into a regime where coherence across the IGM becomes weak and difficult to detect. We fit 222 discrete Ly-alpha absorbers to sightline A and 211 to sightline B. Relative to a Monte Carlo pairing test (using symmetric, nearest neighbor matching) the data exhibit a 4sigma excess of pairs at low velocity splitting (<150 km/s), thus detecting coherence on transverse scales of ~2.5 h^-1 Mpc. We use spectra extracted from an SPH simulation to analyze symmetric pair matching, transmission distributions as a function of redshift and compute zero-lag cross-correlations to compare with the quasar pair data. The simulations agree with the data with the same strength (~4sigma) at similarly low velocity splitting above random chance pairings. In cross-correlation tests, the simulations agree when the mean flux (as a function of redshift) is assumed to follow the prescription given by Kirkman et al. (2005). While the detection of flux correlation (measured through coincident absorbers and cross-correlation amplitude) is only marginally significant, the agreement between data and simulations is encouraging for future work in which even better quality data will provide the best insight into the overarching structure of the IGM and its understanding as shown by SPH simulations.