• While feedback from massive stars exploding as supernovae (SNe) is thought to be one of the key ingredients regulating galaxy formation, theoretically it is still unclear how the available energy couples to the interstellar medium and how galactic scale outflows are launched. We present a novel implementation of six sub-grid SN feedback schemes in the moving-mesh code Arepo, including injections of thermal and/or kinetic energy, two parametrizations of delayed cooling feedback and a `mechanical' feedback scheme that injects the correct amount of momentum depending on the relevant scale of the SN remnant resolved. All schemes make use of individually time-resolved SN events. Adopting isolated disk galaxy setups at different resolutions, with the highest resolution runs reasonably resolving the Sedov-Taylor phase of the SN, we aim to find a physically motivated scheme with as few tunable parameters as possible. As expected, simple injections of energy overcool at all but the highest resolution. Our delayed cooling schemes result in overstrong feedback, destroying the disk. The mechanical feedback scheme is efficient at suppressing star formation, agrees well with the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation and leads to converged star formation rates and galaxy morphologies with increasing resolution without fine tuning any parameters. However, we find it difficult to produce outflows with high enough mass loading factors at all but the highest resolution, indicating either that we have oversimplified the evolution of unresolved SN remnants, require other stellar feedback processes to be included, require a better star formation prescription or most likely some combination of these issues.
  • Spectroscopic observations of some metal-rich white dwarfs (WDs), believed to be polluted by planetary material, reveal the presence of compact gaseous metallic disks orbiting them. The observed variability of asymmetric, double-peaked emission line profiles in about half of such systems could be interpreted as the signature of precession of an eccentric gaseous debris disk. The variability timescales --- from decades down to $1.4$ yr (recently inferred for the debris disk around HE 1349--2305) --- are in rough agreement with the rate of general relativistic (GR) precession in the test particle limit. However, it has not been demonstrated that this mechanism can drive such a fast, coherent precession of a radially extended (out to $1 R_\odot$) gaseous disk mediated by internal stresses (pressure). Here we use the linear theory of eccentricity evolution in hydrodynamic disks to determine several key properties of eccentric modes in gaseous debris disks around WDs. We find a critical dependence of both the precession period and radial eccentricity distribution of the modes on the inner disk radius, $r_\mathrm{in}$. For small inner radii, $r_\mathrm{in} \lesssim (0.2 - 0.4) R_\odot$, the modes are GR-driven, with periods of $\approx 1 - 10$ yr. For $r_\mathrm{in} \gtrsim (0.2 - 0.4) R_\odot$, the modes are pressure-dominated, with periods of $\approx 3 - 20$ yr. Correspondence between the variability periods and inferred inner radii of the observed disks is in general agreement with this trend. In particular, the short period of HE 1349--2305 is consistent with its small $r_\mathrm{in}$. Circum-WD debris disks may thus serve as natural laboratories for studying the evolution of eccentric gaseous disks.
  • Realistic stellar atmospheric models of two typical metal-poor giant stars in Omega Centauri that include a chromosphere influence the formation of optical lines of Oxygen I: the forbidden lines (630nm, 636nm) and the infrared triplet (777.1-777.5 nm). One-dimensional semi-empirical non-LTE models are constructed based on observed Balmer lines. A full non-LTE formulation is applied in evaluating line strengths of O I including photoionization by the Lyman continuum and photoexcitation by Ly-alpha and Ly-beta. Chromospheric models (CHR) yield forbidden oxygen transitions that are stronger than in radiative/convective equilibrium (RCE) models. The triplet oxygen lines from high levels also appear stronger than produced in an RCE model. The inferred oxygen abundance from realistic CHR models for these two stars is decreased by factors ~3 as compared to values derived from RCE models. A lower oxygen abundance suggests that intermediate mass AGB stars contribute to the observed abundance pattern in globular clusters. A change in the oxygen abundance of metal-poor field giants could affect models of deep mixing episodes on the red giant branch. Changes in the oxygen abundance can impact other abundance determinations critical to astrophysics including chemical tagging techniques and galactic chemical evolution.
  • Cavity-enhanced frequency comb spectroscopy for molecule detection in the mid-infrared powerfully combines high resolution, high sensitivity, and broad spectral coverage. However, this technique, and essentially all spectroscopic methods, is limited in application to relatively small, simple molecules. Here we integrate comb spectroscopy with continuous, cold samples of molecules produced via buffer gas cooling, thus enabling the study of significantly more complex molecules. We report simultaneous gains in resolution, sensitivity, and bandwidth and demonstrate this combined capability with the first rotationally resolved direct absorption spectra in the CH stretch region of several complex molecules. These include nitromethane (CH$_3$NO$_2$), a model system that presents challenging questions to the understanding of large amplitude vibrational motion, as well as several large organic molecules with fundamental spectroscopic and astrochemical relevance, including naphthalene (C$_{10}$H$_8$), adamantane (C$_{10}$H$_{16}$), and hexamethylenetetramine (C$_{6}$N$_4$H$_{12}$). This general spectroscopic tool has the potential to significantly impact the field of molecular spectroscopy, simultaneously improving efficiency, spectral resolution, and specificity by orders of magnitude. This realization could open up new molecular species and new kinetics for precise investigations, including the study of complex molecules, weakly bound clusters, and cold chemistry.
  • We analyzed a large sample of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasar spectra at redshift 1.0 < z < 1.2 to compare the inferred underlying quasar continuum slopes (after removal of the host galaxy contribution) with accretion disk models. The latter predict redder (decreasing) alpha_3000 continuum slopes (L_\nu~\nu^alpha at 3000Ang) with increasing black hole mass, bluer alpha_3000 with increasing luminosity at 3000Ang, and bluer alpha_3000 with increasing spin of the black hole, when all other parameters are held fixed. We find no clear evidence for any of these predictions in the data. In particular we find that: (i) alpha_3000 shows no significant dependence on black hole mass or luminosity. Dedicated Monte Carlo tests suggest that the substantial observational uncertainties in the black hole virial masses can effectively erase any intrinsic dependence of alpha_3000 on black hole mass, in line with some previous studies. (ii) The mean slope alpha_3000 of radio-loud sources, thought to be produced by rapidly spinning black holes, is comparable to, or even redder than, that of radio-quiet quasars. Indeed, although quasars appear to become more radio loud with decreasing luminosity, we still do not detect any significant dependence of alpha_3000 on radio loudness. The predicted mean alpha_3000 slopes tend to be bluer than in the data. Disk models with high inclinations and dust extinction tend to produce redder slopes closer to empirical estimates. Our mean alpha_3000 values are close to the ones independently inferred at z<0.5 suggesting weak evolution with redshift, at least for moderately luminous quasars.
  • The progenitors of many CCSNe are expected to be in binary systems. After the SN explosion, the companion may suffer from mass stripping and be shock heated as a result of the impact of the SN ejecta. If the binary system is disrupted, the companion is ejected as a runaway and hypervelocity star. By performing a series of 3D hydrodynamical simulations of the collision of SN ejecta with the companion star, we investigate how CCSN explosions affect their companions. We use the BEC code to construct the detailed companion structure at the time of SN explosion. The impact of the SN blast wave on the companion is followed by means of 3D SPH simulations using the Stellar GADGET code. For main-sequence (MS) companions, we find that the amount of removed mass, impact velocity, and chemical contamination of the companion that results from the impact of the SN ejecta, strongly increases with decreasing binary separation and increasing explosion energy. Their relationship can be approximately fitted by power laws, which is consistent with the results obtained from impact simulations of SNe~Ia. However, we find that the impact velocity is sensitive to the momentum profile of the outer SN ejecta and, in fact, may decrease with increasing ejecta mass, depending on the modeling of the ejecta. Because most companions to Ib/c CCSNe are in their MS phase at the moment of the explosion, combined with the strongly decaying impact effects with increasing binary separation, we argue that the majority of these SNe lead to inefficient mass stripping and shock heating of the companion star following the impact of the ejecta. Our simulations show that the impact effects of Ib/c SN ejecta on the structure of MS companions, and thus their long-term post-explosion evolution, is in general not dramatic. We find that at most 10% of their mass is lost, and their resulting impact velocities are less than 100 km/s.
  • Bressert et al. recently showed that the surface density distribution of low-mass, young stellar objects (YSOs) in the solar neighbourhood is approximately log-normal. The authors conclude that the star formation process is hierarchical and that only a small fraction of stars form in dense star clusters. Here, we show that the peak and the width of the density distribution are also what follow if all stars form in bound clusters which are not significantly affected by the presence of gas and expand by two-body relaxation. The peak of the surface density distribution is simply obtained from the typical ages (few Myr) and cluster membership number (few hundred) typifying nearby star-forming regions. This result depends weakly on initial cluster sizes, provided that they are sufficiently dense (initial half mass radius of <0.3 pc) for dynamical evolution to be important at an age of a few Myr. We conclude that the degeneracy of the YSO surface density distribution complicates its use as a diagnostic of the stellar formation environment.
  • (Abridged) We quantify the bias and scatter in galaxy cluster masses and concentrations derived from an idealised mock weak gravitational lensing (WL) survey, and their effect on the cluster mass-concentration relation. For this, we simulate WL distortions on a population of background galaxies due to a large (~3000) sample of galaxy cluster haloes extracted from the Millennium Simulation at z~0.2. This study takes into account the influence of shape noise, cluster substructure and asphericity as well as correlated large-scale structure, but not uncorrelated large-scale structure along the line of sight and observational effects. We find a small, but non-negligble, negative median bias in both mass and concentration at a level of ~5%, the exact value depending both on cluster mass and radial survey range. Both the mass and concentration derived from WL show considerable scatter about their true values. This scatter has, even for the highest mass clusters of M200 > 10^14.8 M_sun, a level of ~30% and ~20% for concentration and mass respectively and increases strongly with decreasing cluster mass. For a typical survey analysing 30 galaxies per arcmin^2 over a radial range from 30" to 15' from the cluster centre, the derived M200-c relation has a slope and normalisation too low compared to the underlying true (3D) relation by ~40% and ~15% respectively. The scatter and bias in mass are shown to reflect a departure at large radii of the true WL shear/matter distribution of the simulated clusters from the NFW profile adopted in modelling the mock observations. Orientation of the triaxial cluster haloes dominates the concentration scatter (except at low masses, where galaxy shape noise becomes dominant), while the bias in c is mostly due to substructure within the virial radius.
  • We introduce the star cluster evolution code Evolve Me A Cluster of StarS (EMACSS), a simple yet physically motivated computational model that describes the evolution of some fundamental properties of star clusters in static tidal fields. We base our prescription upon the flow of energy within the cluster, which is a constant fraction of the total energy per half-mass relaxation time. According to Henon's predictions, this flow is independent of the precise mechanisms for energy production within the core, and therefore does not require a complete description of the many-body interactions therein. For a cluster of equal-mass stars, we thence use dynamical theory and analytic descriptions of escape mechanisms to construct a series of coupled differential equations expressing the time evolution of cluster mass and radius. These equations are numerically solved using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration kernel, and the results benchmarked against a data base of direct N-body simulations. We use simulations containing a modest initial number of stars (1024 <= N <= 65 536) and point-mass tidal fields of various strengths. Our prescription is publicly available and reproduces the N-body results to within ~10 per cent accuracy for the entire post-collapse evolution of star clusters.
  • We present a revised analysis of a speculated stellar bridge between the Milky Way dwarf galaxies Leo IV and Leo V. Using data acquired with Subaru/Suprime-Cam over a 1deg x 4deg field encompassing the two satellites and the region in between, we confirm our previous detection of a stellar overdensity between Leo IV and Leo V (de Jong et al. 2010). The larger area coverage and improved depth of our current dataset allow for an improved analysis of the stellar overdensity that had previously appeared to bridge the two galaxies. A main-sequence turn-off feature visible in the stacked colour-magnitude diagram of the contiguously observed Subaru fields reveals an extended stellar structure at a distance of approximately 20 kpc. Its angular proximity to the Virgo overdensity, as well as a good correspondence in distance and metallicity, suggests that the smaller structure we detect may be associated with the much larger Virgo stellar overdensity.
  • We estimate the masses of elliptical galaxies out to five effective radii using planetary nebulae and globular clusters as tracers. A sample of 15 elliptical galaxies with a broad variation in mass is compiled from the literature. A distribution function-maximum likelihood analysis is used to estimate the overall potential slope, normalisation and velocity anisotropy of the tracers. We assume power-law profiles for the potential and tracer density and a constant velocity anisotropy. The derived potential power-law indices lie in between the isothermal and Keplerian regime and vary with mass: there is tentative evidence that the less massive galaxies have steeper potential profiles than the more massive galaxies. We use stellar mass-to-light ratios appropriate for either a Chabrier/KTG (Kroupa, Tout & Gilmore) or Salpeter initial mass function to disentangle the stellar and dark matter components. The fraction of dark matter within five effective radii increases with mass, in agreement with several other studies. We employ simple models to show that a combination of star formation efficiency and baryon extent are able to account for this trend. These models are in good agreement with both our measurements out to five effective radii and recent SLACS measurements within one effective radii when a universal Chabrier/KTG initial mass function is adopted.
  • The ISM evolution of elliptical galaxies experiencing feedback from accretion onto a central black hole was studied recently with high-resolution 1D hydrodynamical simulations including radiative heating and pressure effects, a RIAF-like radiative efficiency, mechanical input from AGN winds, and accretion-driven starbursts. Here we focus on the observational properties of the models in the X-ray band (nuclear luminosity; hot ISM luminosity and temperature; temperature and brightness profiles during quiescence and during outbursts). The nuclear bursts last for ~10^7 yr, with a duty-cycle of a few X (10^-3-10^-2); the present epoch bolometric nuclear emission is very sub-Eddington. The ISM thermal luminosity \lx oscillates in phase with the nuclear one; this helps reproduce statistically the observed large \lx variation. In quiescence the temperature profile has a negative gradient; thanks to past outbursts, the brightness profile lacks the steep shape typical of inflowing models. Outbursts produce disturbances in these profiles. Most significantly, a hot bubble from shocked hot gas is inflated at the galaxy center; the bubble would be conical in shape, and show radio emission. The ISM resumes a smooth appearance on a time-scale of ~200 Myr; the duty-cycle of perturbances in the ISM is of the order of 5-10%. From the present analysis, additional input physics is important in the ISM-black hole coevolution, to fully account for the properties of real galaxies, as a confining external medium and a jet. The jet will reduce further the mass available for accretion (and then the Eddington ratio $l$), and may help, together with an external pressure, to produce flat or positive temperature gradient profiles (observed in high density environments). Alternatively, $l$ can be reduced if the switch from high to low radiative efficiency takes place at a larger $l$ than routinely assumed.
  • We address the question of whether protoplanetary discs around low mass stars (e.g. M-dwarfs) may be longer lived than their solar-type counterparts. This question is particularly relevant to assess the planet-making potential of these lower mass discs. Given the uncertainties inherent to age-dating young stars, we propose an alternative approach that is to analyse the spatial distribution of disc-bearing low-mass stars and compare it to that of disc-bearing solar-type stars in the same cluster. A significant age difference between the two populations should be reflected in their average nearest neighbour distance (normalised to the number of sources), where the older population should appear more spread out. To this aim, we perform a Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) analysis on the spatial distribution of disc-bearing young stellar objects (YSOs) in six nearby low mass star forming regions. We find no evidence for significant age differences between the disc-bearing low-mass (later than M2) and 'solar-type' (earlier than M2) stars in these regions. We model our results by constructing and analysing synthetic fractal distributions that we evolve for typical values of the velocity dispersions. A comparison of simple models to our MST analysis suggests that the lifetime of discs around M-stars is similar to that of discs around solar-type stars. Furthermore, a model-independent spatial analysis of the observations robustly shows that any age differences between the two samples must be smaller than the average age difference between disc-bearing classical T-Tauri stars and disc-less Weak-Lined T-Tauri stars.
  • Current optical space telescopes rely upon silicon Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) to detect and image the incoming photons. The performance of a CCD detector depends on its ability to transfer electrons through the silicon efficiently, so that the signal from every pixel may be read out through a single amplifier. This process of electron transfer is highly susceptible to the effects of solar proton damage (or non-ionizing radiation damage). This is because charged particles passing through the CCD displace silicon atoms, introducing energy levels into the semi-conductor bandgap which act as localized electron traps. The reduction in Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) leads to signal loss and image smearing. The European Space Agency's astrometric Gaia mission will make extensive use of CCDs to create the most complete and accurate stereoscopic map to date of the Milky Way. In the context of the Gaia mission CTE is referred to with the complementary quantity Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI = 1-CTE). CTI is an extremely important issue that threatens Gaia's performances. We present here a detailed Monte Carlo model which has been developed to simulate the operation of a damaged CCD at the pixel electrode level. This model implements a new approach to both the charge density distribution within a pixel and the charge capture and release probabilities, which allows the reproduction of CTI effects on a variety of measurements for a large signal level range in particular for signals of the order of a few electrons. A running version of the model as well as a brief documentation and a few examples are readily available at http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/~prodhomme/cemga.php as part of the CEMGA java package (CTI Effects Models for Gaia).
  • The aim of this talk is to present the most recent advances in establishing plausible planetary system architectures determined by the gravitational tidal interactions between the planets and the disc in which they are embedded during the early epoch of planetary system formation. We concentrate on a very well defined and intensively studied process of the disc-planet interaction leading to the planet migration. We focus on the dynamics of the systems in which low-mass planets are present. Particular attention is devoted to investigation of the role of resonant configurations. Our studies, apart from being complementary to the fast progress occurring just now in observing the whole variety of planetary systems and uncovering their structure and origin, can also constitute a valuable contribution in support of the missions planned to enhance the number of detected multiple systems.
  • (Abridged) In this second paper of the series, we present the results from optical Gemini-North GMOS-IFU and WIYN DensePak IFU spectroscopic observations of the starburst and inner wind zones of M82, with a focus on the state of the T~10^4 K ionized interstellar medium. Our electron density maps show peaks of a few 1000 cm-3, local small spatial-scale variations, and a fall-off in the minor axis direction. We discuss the implications of these results with regards to the conditions/locations that may favour the escape of individual cluster winds. Our findings imply that the starburst environment is highly fragmented into a range of clouds from small/dense clumps with low filling factors (<1pc, n_e>10^4 cm-3) to larger filling factor, less dense gas. The near-constant state of the ionization state of the ~10^4 K gas throughout the starburst can be explained as a consequence of the small cloud sizes, which allow the gas conditions to respond quickly to any changes. We have examined in more detail both the broad (FWHM 150-350 km/s) line component found in Paper I that we associated with emission from turbulent mixing layers on the gas clouds, and the discrete outflow channel identified within the inner wind. The channel appears as a coherent, expanding cylindrical structure of length >120 pc and and width 35-50 pc and the walls maintain an approximately constant (but subsonic) expansion velocity of ~60 km/s. We use the channel to examine further the relationship between the narrow and broad component emitting gas within the inner wind. Within the starburst energy injection zone, we find that turbulent motions (as traced by the broad component) appear to play an increasing role with height.
  • We present a Fortran 95 code for simulating the evolution of astrophysical systems using particles to represent the underlying fluid flow. The code is designed to be versatile, flexible and extensible, with modular options that can be selected either at compile time or at run time. We include a number of general purpose modules describing a variety of physical processes commonly required in the astrophysical community. The code can be used as an N-body code to evolve a set of particles in two or three dimensions using either a Leapfrog or Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integrator, with or without individual timesteps for each particle. Particles may interact gravitationally as $N$-body particles, and all or any subset may also interact hydrodynamically, using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) method. Massive point particles (`stars') which may accrete nearby SPH or $N$-body particles may also be included. The default free boundary conditions can be replaced by a module to include periodic boundaries. Cosmological expansion may also be included. An interface with special purpose `GRAPE' hardware may also be selected. If available, forces obtained from the GRAPE coprocessors may be transparently substituted for those obtained from the default tree based calculation. The code may be run without modification on single processors or in parallel using OpenMP compiler directives on large scale, shared memory parallel machines. In comparison to the Gadget-2 code of Springel 2005, the gravitational force calculation is $\approx 3.5 - 4.8$ times faster with VINE when run on 8 Itanium~2 processors in an SGI Altix, while producing nearly identical outcomes in our test problems. We present simulations of several test problems, including a merger simulation of two elliptical galaxies with 800000 particles.
  • We continue our presentation of VINE. We begin with a description of relevant architectural properties of the serial and shared memory parallel computers on which VINE is intended to run, and describe their influences on the design of the code itself. We continue with a detailed description of a number of optimizations made to the layout of the particle data in memory and to our implementation of a binary tree used to access that data for use in gravitational force calculations and searches for SPH neighbor particles. We describe modifications to the code necessary to obtain forces efficiently from special purpose `GRAPE' hardware. We conclude with an extensive series of performance tests, which demonstrate that the code can be run efficiently and without modification in serial on small workstations or in parallel using OpenMP compiler directives on large scale, shared memory parallel machines. We analyze the effects of the code optimizations and estimate that they improve its overall performance by more than an order of magnitude over that obtained by many other tree codes. Scaled parallel performance of the gravity and SPH calculations, together the most costly components of most simulations, is nearly linear up to maximum machine sizes available to us (120 processors on an Origin~3000). At similar accuracy, performance of VINE, used in GRAPE-tree mode, is approximately a factor two slower than that of VINE, used in host-only mode. Optimizations of the GRAPE/host communications could improve the speed by as much as a factor of three, but have not yet been implemented in VINE.
  • We use a large set of cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to examine the effect of mass resolution and box size on synthetic Lya forest spectra at 2 \leq z \leq 5. The mass resolution requirements for the convergence of the mean Lya flux and flux power spectrum at z=5 are significantly stricter than at lower redshift. This is because transmission in the high redshift Lya forest is primarily due to underdense regions in the intergalactic medium (IGM), and these are less well resolved compared to the moderately overdense regions which dominate the Lya forest opacity at z~2-3. We further find that the gas density distribution in our simulations differs significantly from previous results in the literature at large overdensities (\Delta>10). We conclude that studies of the Lya forest at z=5 using SPH simulations require a gas particle mass of M_gas \leq 2x10^5 M_sol/h, which is >8 times the value required at z=2. A box size of at least 40 Mpc/h is preferable at all redshifts.
  • We present new models for the X-ray photoevaporation of circumstellar discs which suggest that the resulting mass loss (occurring mainly over the radial range 10-40 AU) may be the dominant dispersal mechanism for gas around low mass pre-main sequence stars, contrary to the conclusions of previous workers. Our models combine use of the MOCASSIN Monte Carlo radiative transfer code and a self-consistent solution of the hydrostatic structure of the irradiated disc. We estimate the resulting photoevaporation rates assuming sonic outflow at the surface where the gas temperature equals the local escape temperature and derive mass loss rates of ~10^{-9} M_sun/yr, typically a factor 2-10 times lower than the corresponding rates in our previous work (Ercolano et al., 2008) where we did not adjust the density structure of the irradiated disc. The somewhat lower rates, and the fact that mass loss is concentrated towards slightly smaller radii, result from the puffing up of the heated disc at a few AU which partially screens the disc at tens of AU. (.....) We highlight the fact that X-ray photoevaporation has two generic advantages for disc dispersal compared with photoevaporation by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons that are only modestly beyond the Lyman limit: the demonstrably large X-ray fluxes of young stars even after they have lost their discs and the fact that X-rays are effective at penetrating much larger columns of material close to the star (abridged).
  • We present confusion limited submillimetre (submm) observations with the SCUBA camera on the JCMT of the z=2.83 Lyman-break galaxy (LBG), Westphal-MM8, reaching an 850um sensitivity even greater than that achieved in the SCUBA map of the Hubble Deep Field region. The detection of Westphal-MM8 (S_{850um} = 1.98+-0.48mJy), along with the literature submm detections of lensed LBGs, suggest that the LBG population may contribute significantly to the source counts of submm selected galaxies in the 1-2mJy regime. Additionally, submm-luminous LBGs are a viable progenitor population for the recently discovered evolved galaxies at z~2-2.5. These observations represent an important baseline for SCUBA2 observations which will regularly map large regions of the sky to this depth.
  • This White Paper to the National Academy of Sciences Astro2010 Decadal Review Committee outlines some of the outstanding questions regarding the assembly history of Massive Black Holes in the nuclei of galaxies and the revolutionary contributions anticipated in this field from low-frequency gravitational wave astronomy.
  • Temperature, density and abundance profiles of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) are important diagnostics of the complex interactions of gravitational and feedback processes in the cores of galaxy clusters. Deprojection of X-ray data by methods such as projct, which are model dependent, can produce large and unphysical oscillating temperature profiles. Here we validate a deprojection routine, Direct Spectral Deprojection (DSDeproj; Sanders & Fabian 2007), showing that it solves some of the issues inherent to model-dependent deprojection routines. DSDeproj is a model-independent approach, assuming only spherical symmetry, which subtracts projected spectra from each successive annulus to produce a set of deprojected spectra.
  • The next generation of X-ray telescopes have the potential to detect faint quasars at very high redshift and probe the early growth of massive black holes (BHs). We present modelling of the evolution of the optical and X-ray AGN luminosity function at 2 < z < 6 based on a CDM merger-driven model for the triggering of nuclear activity combined with a variety of fading laws. We extrapolate the merger-driven models to z > 6 for a range of BH growth scenarios. We predict significant numbers of sources at z ~ 6 with fluxes just an order of magnitude below the current detection limits and thus detectable with XEUS and Constellation-X, relatively independently of the fading law chosen. The predicted number of sources at even higher redshift depends sensitively on the early growth history of BHs. For passive evolution models in which BHs grow constantly at their Eddington limit, detectable BHs may be rare beyond z ~ 10 even with Generation-X. However, in the more probable scenario that BH growth at z > 6 can be described by passive evolution with a small duty cycle, or by our merger driven accretion model, then we predict that XEUS and Generation-X will detect significant numbers of black holes out to z ~ 10 and perhaps beyond.
  • We model the extremely massive and luminous lens galaxy in the Cosmic Horseshoe Einstein ring system, recently discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use the semi-linear method of Warren & Dye (2003), which pixelises the source surface brightness distribution, to invert the Einstein ring for sets of parameterised lens models. Here, the method is refined by exploiting Bayesian inference to optimise adaptive pixelisation of the source plane and to choose between three differently parameterised models: a singular isothermal ellipsoid, a power law model and a NFW profile. The most probable lens model is the power law with a volume mass density that scales as r^(-1.96+/-0.02) and an axis ratio of ~0.8. The mass within the Einstein ring (i.e., within a cylinder with projected distance of ~30 kpc from the centre of the lens galaxy) is (5.02+/-0.09)*10^12 M_solar, and the mass-to-light ratio is ~30. Even though the lens lies in a group of galaxies, the preferred value of the external shear is almost zero. This makes the Cosmic Horseshoe unique amongst large separation lenses, as almost all the deflection comes from a single, very massive galaxy with little boost from the environment.