• Objectives: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common heart rhythm disorder associated with deadly and debilitating consequences including heart failure, stroke, poor mental health, reduced quality of life and death. Having an automatic system that diagnoses various types of cardiac arrhythmias would assist cardiologists to initiate appropriate preventive measures and to improve the analysis of cardiac disease. To this end, this paper introduces a new approach to detect and classify automatically cardiac arrhythmias in electrocardiograms (ECG) recordings. Methods: The proposed approach used a combination of Convolution Neural Networks (CNNs) and a sequence of Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) units, with pooling, dropout and normalization techniques to improve their accuracy. The network predicted a classification at every 18th input sample and we selected the final prediction for classification. Results were cross-validated on the Physionet Challenge 2017 training dataset, which contains 8,528 single lead ECG recordings lasting from 9s to just over 60s. Results: Using the proposed structure and no explicit feature selection, 10-fold stratified cross-validation gave an overall F-measure of 0.83.10-0.015 on the held-out test data (mean-standard deviation over all folds) and 0.80 on the hidden dataset of the Challenge entry server.
  • Advancements in computing based on qubit networks, and in particular the flux-qubit processor architecture developed by D-Wave System's Inc., have enabled the physical simulation of quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) networks beyond the limit of classical methods. However, the embedding of QCA networks onto the available processor architecture is a key challenge in preparing such simulations. In this work, two approaches to embedding QCA circuits are characterized: a dense placement algorithm that uses a routing method based on negotiated congestion; and a heuristic method implemented in D-Wave's Solver API package. A set of benchmark QCA networks is used to characterise the algorithms and a stochastic circuit generator is employed to investigate the performance for different processor sizes and active flux-qubit yields.
  • Magnetars are young and highly magnetized neutron stars which display a wide array of X-ray activity including short bursts, large outbursts, giant flares and quasi-periodic oscillations, often coupled with interesting timing behavior including enhanced spin-down, glitches and anti-glitches. The bulk of this activity is explained by the evolution and decay of an ultrastrong magnetic field, stressing and breaking the neutron star crust, which in turn drives twists of the external magnetosphere and powerful magnetospheric currents. The population of detected magnetars has grown to about 30 objects and shows unambiguous phenomenological connection with very highly magnetized radio pulsars. Recent progress in magnetar theory includes explanation of the hard X-ray component in the magnetar spectrum and development of surface heating models, explaining the sources' remarkable radiative output.
  • In this paper, we investigate bounded action theories in the situation calculus. A bounded action theory is one which entails that, in every situation, the number of object tuples in the extension of fluents is bounded by a given constant, although such extensions are in general different across the infinitely many situations. We argue that such theories are common in applications, either because facts do not persist indefinitely or because the agent eventually forgets some facts, as new ones are learnt. We discuss various classes of bounded action theories. Then we show that verification of a powerful first-order variant of the mu-calculus is decidable for such theories. Notably, this variant supports a controlled form of quantification across situations. We also show that through verification, we can actually check whether an arbitrary action theory maintains boundedness.
  • Context: The physical origin behind organic emission in embedded low-mass star formation has been fiercely debated in the last two decades. A multitude of scenarios have been proposed, from a hot corino to PDRs on cavity walls to shock excitation. Aims: The aim of this paper is to determine the location and the corresponding physical conditions of the gas responsible for organics emission lines. The outflows around the small protocluster NGC 2071 are an ideal testbed to differentiate between various scenarios. Methods: Using Herschel-HIFI and the SMA, observations of CH3OH, H2CO and CH3CN emission lines over a wide range of excitation energies were obtained. Comparisons to a grid of radiative transfer models provide constraints on the physical conditions. Comparison to H2O line shape is able to trace gas-phase synthesis versus a sputtered origin. Results: Emission of organics originates in three spots: the continuum sources IRS 1 ('B') and IRS 3 ('A') as well as a outflow position ('F'). Densities are above 10$^7$ cm$^{-3}$ and temperatures between 100 to 200 K. CH3OH emission observed with HIFI originates in all three regions and cannot be associated with a single region. Very little organic emission originates outside of these regions. Conclusions: Although the three regions are small (<1,500 AU), gas-phase organics likely originate from sputtering of ices due to outflow activity. The derived high densities (>10$^7$ cm$^{-3}$) are likely a requirement for organic molecules to survive from being destroyed by shock products. The lack of spatially extended emission confirms that organic molecules cannot (re)form through gas-phase synthesis, as opposed to H2O, which shows strong line wing emission. The lack of CH3CN emission at 'F' is evidence for a different history of ice processing due to the absence of a protostar at that location and recent ice mantle evaporation.
  • We present an analysis of the far-infrared and submillimetre molecular emission line spectrum of the luminous M-supergiant VY CMa, observed with the SPIRE and PACS spectrometers aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. Over 260 emission lines were detected in the 190-650-micron SPIRE FTS spectra, with one-third of the observed lines being attributable to H2O. Other detected species include CO, 13CO, H2^18O, SiO, HCN, SO, SO2, CS, H2S, and NH3. Our model fits to the observed 12CO and 13CO line intensities yield a 12C/13C ratio of 5.6+-1.8, consistent with measurements of this ratio for other M supergiants, but significantly lower than previously estimated for VY CMa from observations of lower-J lines. The spectral line energy distribution for twenty SiO rotational lines shows two temperature components: a hot component at 1000 K, which we attribute to the stellar atmosphere and inner wind, plus a cooler ~200 K component, which we attribute to an origin in the outer circumstellar envelope. We fit the line fluxes of 12CO, 13CO, H2O and SiO, using the SMMOL non-LTE line transfer code, with a mass-loss rate of 1.85x10^-4 Msun yr^-1 between 9 R* and 350 R*. To fit the observed line fluxes of 12CO, 13CO, H2O and SiO with SMMOL non-LTE line radiative transfer code, along with a mass-loss rate of 1.85x10^-4 Msun yr^-1. To fit the high rotational lines of CO and H2O, the model required a rather flat temperature distribution inside the dust condensation radius, attributed to the high H2O opacity. Beyond the dust condensation radius the gas temperature is fitted best by an r^-0.5 radial dependence, consistent with the coolant lines becoming optically thin. Our H2O emission line fits are consistent with an ortho:para ratio of 3 in the outflow.
  • Ultra Violet Imaging Telescope on ASTROSAT Satellite mission is a suite of Far Ultra Violet (FUV 130 to 180 nm), Near Ultra Violet (NUV 200 to 300 nm) and Visible band (VIS 320 to 550nm) imagers. ASTROSAT is the first multi wavelength mission of INDIA. UVIT will image the selected regions of the sky simultaneously in three channels and observe young stars, galaxies, bright UV Sources. FOV in each of the 3 channels is about 28 arc-minute. Targeted angular resolution in the resulting UV images is better than 1.8 arc-second (better than 2.0 arc-second for the visible channel). Two identical co-aligned telescopes (T1, T2) of Ritchey-Chretien configuration (Primary mirror of 375 mm diameter) collect celestial radiation and feed to the detector system via a selectable filter on a filter wheel mechanism; gratings are available in filter wheels of FUV and NUV channels for slit-less low resolution spectroscopy. The detector system for each of the 3 channels is generically identical. One of the telescopes images in the FUV channel, while the other images in NUV and VIS channels. Images from VIS channel are also used for measuring drift for reconstruction of images on ground through shift and add algorithm, and to reconstruct absolute aspect of the images. Adequate baffling has been provided for reducing scattered background from the Sun, earth albedo and other bright objects. One time open-able mechanical cover on each telescope also works as a Sun-shield after deployment. We are presenting here the overall (mechanical, optical and electrical) design of the payload.
  • [abridged] The LMXB 4U 0614+091 is a source of sporadic thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts. We find bursts with a wide variety of characteristics in serendipitous wide-field X-ray observations by EURECA/WATCH, RXTE/ASM, BeppoSAX/WFC, HETE-2/FREGATE, INTEGRAL/IBIS/ISGRI, and Swift/BAT, as well as pointed observations by RXTE/PCA and HEXTE. Most of them reach a peak flux of ~15 Crab, but a few only reach a peak flux below a Crab. One of the bursts shows a very strong photospheric radius-expansion phase. This allows us to evaluate the distance to the source: 3.2 kpc. The burst durations are between 10 sec to 5 min. However, after one of the intermediate-duration bursts, a faint tail is seen to at least ~2.4 hours after the start of the burst. One very long burst lasted for several hours. This superburst candidate was followed by a normal type-I burst only 19 days later. This is, to our knowledge, the shortest burst-quench time among the superbursters. A superburst in this system is difficult to reconcile if it accretes at ~1% L_Edd. The intermediate-duration bursts occurred when 4U 0614+091's persistent emission was lowest and calm, and when bursts were infrequent (on average one every month to 3 months). The average burst rate increased significantly after this period. The maximum average burst recurrence rate is once every week to 2 weeks. The burst behaviour may be partly understood if there is at least an appreciable amount of helium present in the accreted material from the donor star. If the system is an ultra-compact X-ray binary with a CO white-dwarf donor, as has been suggested, this is unexpected. If the bursts are powered by helium, we find that the energy production per accumulated mass is about 2.5 times less than expected for pure helium matter.
  • A hypothetical time-variation of the gravitational constant $G$ would make neutron stars expand or contract, so the matter in their interiors would depart from beta equilibrium. This induces non-equilibrium weak reactions, which release energy that is invested partly in neutrino emission and partly in internal heating. Eventually, the star arrives at a stationary state in which the temperature remains nearly constant, as the forcing through the change of $G$ is balanced by the ongoing reactions. Using the surface temperature of the nearest millisecond pulsar (PSR J0437$-$4715) inferred from ultraviolet observations and results from theoretical modelling of the thermal evolution, we estimate two upper limits for this variation: (1) $|\dot G/G| < 2 \times 10^{-10}\mathrm{yr}^{-1},$ if the fast, "direct Urca" reactions are allowed, and (2) $|\dot G/G|<4\times 10^{-12}\mathrm{yr}^{-1},$ considering only the slower, "modified Urca" reactions. The latter is among the most restrictive upper limits obtained by other methods.
  • Magnetic-field-induced changes of the Fermi surface play a central role in theories of the exotic quantum criticality of YbRh2Si2. We have carried out de Haas-van Alphen measurements in the magnetic-field range 8 T <= H <= 16 T, and directly observe field dependence of the extremal Fermi surface areas. Our data support the theory that a low-field "large" Fermi surface, including the Yb 4f quasihole, is increasingly spin split until a majority-spin branch undergoes a Lifshitz transition and disappears at H0 ~ 10 T, without requiring 4f localization at H0.
  • As molecular dynamics is increasingly used to characterize non-crystalline materials, it is crucial to verify that the numerical model is accurate enough, consistent with experimental data and can be used to extract various characteristics of disordered systems. In most cases the only derived property used to test the "realism" of the models has been the radial distribution function. We report extensive ab-initio simulation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon that demonstrates that although agreement with the RDF is a necessary requirement, this protocol is insufficient for the validation of a model. We prove that the derivation of vibrational spectra is a more efficient and valid protocol to ensure the reproducibility of macroscopic experimental features.
  • We present quantum oscillation measurements of YbRh2Si2 at magnetic fields above the Kondo-suppression scale H0 ~ 10 T. Comparison with electronic structure calculations is complicated because the "small" Fermi surface, where the Yb 4f-quasi-hole is not contributing to the Fermi volume, and "large" Fermi surface, where the Yb 4f-quasi-hole is contributing to the Fermi volume, are related by a rigid Fermi energy shift. This means that spin-split branches of the large Fermi surface can look like unsplit branches of the small surface, and vice-versa. Thus, although the high-field angle dependence of the experimentally-measured oscillation frequencies most resembles the electronic structure prediction for the small Fermi surface, this may instead be a branch of the spin-split large Fermi surface.
  • We present a study of the old globular clusters (GC) using archival F606W and F814W HST/ACS images of 19 Magellanic-type dwarf Irregular (dIrr) galaxies found in nearby (2 - 8 Mpc) associations of only dwarf galaxies. All dIrrs have absolute magnitudes fainter than or equal to the SMC (Mv = -16.2 mag). We detect 50 GC candidates in 13 dIrrs, of which 37 have (V-I) colors consistent with "blue" (old, metal-poor) GCs (bGC). The luminosity function (LF) of the bGCs in our sample peaks at Mv = -7.41 +/- 0.22 mag, consistent with other galaxy types. The width of the LF is sigma = 1.79 +/- 0.31 which is typical for dIrrs, but broader than the typical width in massive galaxies. The half-light radii and ellipticities of the GCs in our sample (rh ~ 3.3 pc, e ~ 0.1) are similar to those of old GCs in the Magellanic Clouds and to those of "Old Halo" (OH) GCs in our Galaxy, but not as extended and spherical as the Galactic "Young Halo" (YH) GCs (rh ~ 7.7 pc, e ~ 0.06). The e distribution shows a turnover rather than a power law as observed for the Galactic GCs. This might suggest that GCs in dIrrs are kinematically young and not fully relaxed yet. The present-day specific frequencies (SN) span a broad range: 0.3 < SN < 11. Assuming a dissipationless age fading of the galaxy light, the SN values would increase by a factor of ~ 2.5 to 16, comparable with values for early-type dwarfs (dE/dSphs). A bright central GC candidate, similar to nuclear clusters of dEs, is observed in one of our dIrrs: NGC 1959. This nuclear GC has luminosity, color, and structural parameters similar to that of wCen and M54, suggesting that the latter might have their origin in the central regions of similar Galactic building blocks. A comparison between properties of bGCs and Galactic YH GCs, suspected to have originated from similar dIrrs, is performed.
  • We present K-band imaging of two ~30'x30' fields covered by the MUSYC Wide NIR Survey. The 1030 and 1255 fields were imaged with ISPI on the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO to a 5 sigma point-source limiting depth of K~20 (Vega). Combining this data with the MUSYC Optical UBVRIz imaging, we created multi-band K-selected source catalogs for both fields. These catalogs, together with the MUSYC K-band catalog of the ECDF-S field, were used to select K<20 BzK galaxies over an area of 0.71 deg^2. This is the largest area ever surveyed for BzK galaxies. We present number counts, redshift distributions and stellar masses for our sample of 3261 BzK galaxies (2502 star-forming (sBzK) and 759 passively evolving (pBzK)), as well as reddening and star formation rate estimates for the star-forming BzK systems. We also present 2-point angular correlation functions and spatial correlation lengths for both sBzK and pBzK galaxies and show that previous estimates of the correlation function of these galaxies were affected by cosmic variance due to the small areas surveyed. We have measured correlation lengths r_0 of 8.89+/-2.03 Mpc and 10.82+/-1.72 Mpc for sBzK and pBzK galaxies respectively. This is the first reported measurement of the spatial correlation function of passive BzK galaxies. In the LambdaCDM scenario of galaxy formation, these correlation lengths at z~2 translate into minimum masses of ~4x10^{12} M_sun and ~9x10^{12} M_sun for the dark matter (DM) halos hosting sBzK and pBzK galaxies respectively. The clustering properties of the galaxies in our sample are consistent with them being the descendants of bright LBG at z~3, and the progenitors of present-day >1L* galaxies.
  • We quantitatively investigate how collisional avalanches may developin debris discs as the result of the initial break-up of a planetesimal or comet-like object, triggering a collisional chain reaction due to outward escaping small dust grains. We use a specifically developed numerical code that follows both the spatial distribution of the dust grains and the evolution of their size-frequency distribution due to collisions. We investigate how strongly avalanche propagation depends on different parameters (e.g., amount of dust released in the initial break-up, collisional properties of dust grains and their distribution in the disc). Our simulations show that avalanches evolve on timescales of ~1000 years, propagating outwards following a spiral-like pattern, and that their amplitude exponentially depends on the number density of dust grains in the system. We estimate a probability for witnessing an avalanche event as a function of disc densities, for a gas-free case around an A-type star, and find that features created by avalanche propagation can lead to observable asymmetries for dusty systems with a beta Pictoris-like dust content or higher. Characteristic observable features include: (i) a brightness asymmetry of the two sides for a disc viewed edge-on, and (ii) a one-armed open spiral or a lumpy structure in the case of face-on orientation. A possible system in which avalanche-induced structures might have been observed is the edge-on seen debris disc around HD32297, which displays a strong luminosity difference between its two sides.
  • We present the Boltzmann moment equation approach for the dynamics of stars (BEADS-2D), which is a finite-difference Eulerian numerical code designed for the modelling of anisotropic and non-axisymmetric flat stellar disks. The BEADS-2D code solves the Boltzmann moment equations up to second order in the thin-disk approximation. This allows us to obtain the anisotropy of the velocity ellipsoid and the vertex deviation in the plane of the disk. We study the time-dependent evolution of exponential stellar disks in the linear regime and beyond. The disks are initially characterized by different values of the Toomre parameter Q_s and are embedded in a dark matter halo, yielding a rotation curve composed of a rigid central part and a flat outer region. Starting from a near equilibrium state, several unstable modes develop in the disk. In the early linear phase, the very centre and the large scales are characterized by growing one-armed and bisymmetric positive density perturbations, respectively. This is in agreement with expectations from the swing amplification mechanism of short-wavelength trailing disturbances, propagating through the disk centre. In the late linear phase, the overall appearance is dominated by a two-armed spiral structure localized within the outer Lindblad resonance (OLR). During the non-linear evolutionary phase, radial mass redistribution due to the gravitational torques of spiral arms produces an outflow of mass, which forms a ring at the OLR, and an inflow of mass, which forms a transient central bar. This process of mass redistribution is self-regulatory and it terminates when spiral arms diminish due to a shortage of matter. Finally, a compact central disk and a diffuse ring at the OLR are formed (the abstract is abridged).
  • We study numerically the evolution of rotating cloud cores, from the collapse of a magnetically supercritical core to the formation of a protostar and the development of a protostellar disk during the main accretion phase. We find that the disk quickly becomes unstable to the development of a spiral structure similar to that observed recently in AB Aurigae. A continuous infall of matter from the protostellar envelope makes the protostellar disk unstable, leading to spiral arms and the formation of dense protostellar/protoplanetary clumps within them. The growing strength of spiral arms and ensuing redistribution of mass and angular momentum creates a strong centrifugal disbalance in the disk and triggers bursts of mass accretion during which the dense protostellar/protoplanetary clumps fall onto the central protostar. These episodes of clump infall may manifest themselves as episodes of vigorous accretion rate (\ge 10^{-4} M_sun/yr) as is observed in FU Orionis variables. Between these accretion bursts, the protostar is characterized by a low accretion rate (< 10^{-6} M_sun/yr). During the phase of episodic accretion, the mass of the protostellar disk remains less than or comparable to the mass of the protostar.
  • Motivated by recent observations which detect dust at large galactocentric distances in the disks of spiral galaxies, we propose a mechanism of outward radial transport of dust by spiral stellar density waves. We consider spiral galaxies in which most of dust formation is localized inside the corotation radius. We show that in the disks of such spiral galaxies, the dust grains can travel over radial distances that exceed the corotation radius by roughly 25%. A fraction of the dust grains can be trapped on kidney-shaped stable orbits between the stellar spiral arms and thus can escape the destructive effect of supernova explosions. These grains form diffuse dusty spiral arms, which stretch 4-5 kpc from the sites of active star formation. About 10% of dust by mass injected inside corotation, can be transported over radial distances 3-4 kpc during approximately 1.0 Gyr. This is roughly an order of magnitude more efficient than can be provided by the turbulent motions.
  • Point-contact spectroscopy was performed on single crystals of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn_5 between 150 mK and 2.5 K. A pulsed measurement technique ensured minimal Joule heating over a wide voltage range. The spectra show Andreev-reflection characteristics with multiple structures which depend on junction impedance. Spectral analysis using the generalized Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk formalism for d-wave pairing revealed two coexisting order parameter components, with amplitudes Delta_1 = 0.95 +/- 0.15 meV and Delta_2 = 2.4 +/- 0.3 meV, which evolve differently with temperature. Our observations indicate a highly unconventional pairing mechanism, possibly involving multiple bands.
  • In many problems, it is necessary to integrate a transport equation. Here we consider specifically light incident on a horizontally homogeneous foliage ('the canopy'), modeled as a turbid medium. This is often treated by integrating numerically the light transport equation, assuming initial values for the reflected radiances, and iterating until the radiances stabilize. We here present a method combining transfer matrices, transmission-reflection matrices, and Green's matrices (TTRG). This method is both fast and accurate, especially if one must do many computations on the same canopy, for different incident fluxes and internal emissions. There exist (artificial) extreme light trapping situations for which iterative integration is hardly practical, while TTRG remains as efficient.
  • Here we study the effects of many-body interactions on rate and mechanism in protein folding, using the results of molecular dynamics simulations on numerous coarse-grained C-alpha-model single-domain proteins. After adding three-body interactions explicitly as a perturbation to a Go-like Hamiltonian with native pair-wise interactions only, we have found 1) a significantly increased correlation with experimental phi-values and folding rates, 2) a stronger correlation of folding rate with contact order, matching the experimental range in rates when the fraction of three-body energy in the native state is ~ 20%, and 3) a considerably larger amount of 3-body energy present in Chymotripsin inhibitor than other proteins studied.
  • We re-examine the nature of NGC2024-IRS2 in light of the recent discovery of the late O-type star, IRS2b, located 5 arcsec from IRS2. Using L-band spectroscopy, we set a lower limit of Av = 27.0 mag on the visual extinction towards IRS2. Arguments based on the nature of the circumstellar material, favor an Av of 31.5 mag. IRS2 is associated with the UCHII region G206.543-16.347 and the infrared source IRAS 05393-0156. We show that much of the mid-infrared emission towards IRS2, as well as the far infrared emission peaking at ~ 100 micron, do not originate in the direct surroundings of IRS2, but instead from an extended molecular cloud. Using new K-, L- and L'-band spectroscopy and a comprehensive set of infrared and radio continuum measurements from the literature, we apply diagnostics based on the radio slope, the strength of the infrared hydrogen recombination lines, and the presence of CO band-heads to constrain the nature and spatial distribution of the circumstellar material of IRS2. Using simple gaseous and/or dust models of prescribed geometry, we find strong indications that the infrared flux originating in the circumstellar material of IRS2 is dominated by emission from a dense gaseous disk with a radius of about 0.6 AU. At radio wavelengths the flux density distribution is best described by a stellar wind recombining at a radius of about 100 AU. Although NGC2024/IRS2 shares many similarities with BN-like objects, we do not find evidence for the presence of a dust shell surrounding this object. Therefore, IRS2 is likely more evolved.
  • We discuss a mechanism by which a giant star can expel its envelope in an outburst, leaving its core exposed. The outburst is powered by rotational kinetic energy of the core, transferred to the envelope via the twisting of magnetic fields. We show that, if the core is magnetized, and if it has sufficient angular momentum, this mechanism may be triggered at the end of the asymptotic giant branch phase, and drive a proto-planetary nebula (pPN) outflow. This explosion of magnetic energy self-consistently explains some of the asymmetries and dynamics of pPNe.
  • The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory is suffering a gradual loss of low energy sensitivity due to a buildup of a contaminant. High resolution spectra of bright astrophysical sources using the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) have been analyzed in order to determine the nature of the contaminant by measuring the absorption edges. The dominant element in the contaminant is carbon. Edges due to oxygen and fluorine are also detectable. Excluding H, we find that C, O, and F comprise >80%, 7%, and 7% of the contaminant by number, respectively. Nitrogen is less than 3% of the contaminant. We will assess various candidates for the contaminating material and investigate the growth of the layer with time. For example, the detailed structure of the C-K absorption edge provides information about the bonding structure of the compound, eliminating aromatic hydrocarbons as the contaminating material.
  • Studies of jets from young stellar objects (YSO's) suggest that material is launched from a small central region at wide opening angles and collimated by an interaction with the surrounding environment. Using time-dependent, numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we follow the detailed launching of a central wind via the coupling of a stellar dipole field to the inner edge of an accretion disc. Our method employs a series of nested computational grids, which allows the simulations to follow the central wind out to scales of tens of AU, where it may interact with its surroundings. The coupling between the stellar magnetosphere and disc inner edge has been known to produce an outflow containing both a highly collimated jet plus a wide-angle flow. The jet and wide-angle wind flow at roughly the same speed (100--200 km/s), and most of the energy and mass is carried off at relatively wide angles. We show that the addition of a weak disc-associated field (<< 0.1 Gauss) has little effect on the wind launching, but it collimates the entire flow (jet + wide wind) at a distance of several AU. The collimation is inevitable, regardless of the relative polarity of the disc field and stellar dipole, and the result is a more powerful and physically broader collimated flow than from the star-disc interaction alone. Within the collimation region, the morphology of the large-scale flow resembles a pitchfork, in projection. We compare these results with observations of outflows from YSO's and discuss the possible origin of the disc-associated field.