• We present ALMA 0.87 mm continuum, HCO+ J=4--3 emission line, and CO J=3--2 emission line data of the disk of material around the young, Sun-like star PDS 70. These data reveal the existence of a possible two component transitional disk system with a radial dust gap of 0."2 +/- 0."05, an azimuthal gap in the HCO+ J=4--3 moment zero map, as well as two bridge-like features in the gas data. Interestingly these features in the gas disk have no analogue in the dust disk making them of particular interest. We modeled the dust disk using the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code HOCHUNK3D (Whitney et al. 2013) using a two disk components. We find that there is a radial gap that extends from 15-60 au in all grain sizes which differs from previous work.
  • This whitepaper discusses the diversity of exoplanets that could be detected by future observations, so that comparative exoplanetology can be performed in the upcoming era of large space-based flagship missions. The primary focus will be on characterizing Earth-like worlds around Sun-like stars. However, we will also be able to characterize companion planets in the system simultaneously. This will not only provide a contextual picture with regards to our Solar system, but also presents a unique opportunity to observe size dependent planetary atmospheres at different orbital distances. We propose a preliminary scheme based on chemical behavior of gases and condensates in a planet's atmosphere that classifies them with respect to planetary radius and incident stellar flux.
  • We report on $g$, $r$ and $i$ band observations of the Interstellar Object 'Oumuamua (1I) taken on 2017 October 29 from 04:28 to 08:40 UTC by the Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5m telescope's ARCTIC camera. We find that 1I's colors are $g-r=0.41\pm0.24$ and $r-i=0.23\pm0.25$, consistent with the visible spectra of Masiero (2017), Ye et al. (2017) and Fitzsimmons et al. (2017), and most comparable to the population of Solar System C/D asteroids, Trojans, or comets. We find no evidence of any cometary activity at a heliocentric distance of 1.46 au, approximately 1.5 months after 1I's closest approach distance to the Sun. Significant brightness variability was seen in the $r$ observations, with the object becoming notably brighter towards the end of the run. By combining our APO photometric time series data with the Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) data of Knight et al. (2017), taken 20 h later on 2017 October 30, we construct an almost complete light curve with a most probable lightcurve period of $P \simeq 4~{\rm h}$. Our results imply a double peaked rotation period of 8.1 $\pm$ 0.02 h, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 1.5 - 2.1 mags. Assuming that 1I's shape can be approximated by an ellipsoid, the amplitude constraint implies that 1I has an axial ratio of 3.5 to 10.3, which is strikingly elongated. Assuming that 1I is rotating above its critical break up limit, our results are compatible with 1I having having modest cohesive strength and may have obtained its elongated shape during a tidal disruption event before being ejected from its home system. Astrometry useful for constraining 1I's orbit was also obtained and published in Weaver et al. (2017).
  • Here we advocate an observational strategy to help prioritize exoplanet observations. It starts with more easily obtained observational data, and ranks exoplanets for more difficult follow-up observations based on the likelihood of avoiding planets for which oxygen is a false positives or even an inconclusive signature of life. We find that for oxygen to be a robust biosignature, both land and surface water must be present. Landless exoplanets have much slower biogeochemical cycles, so while oxygenic photosynthesizing life could exist on such planets, it could not produce oxygen at a rate competitive with abiotic rates such as photolysis. These habitable planets, whose life would not be detectable, should be avoided.
  • We have obtained new NASA IRTF SpeX spectra of the HR 4796A debris ring system. We find a unique red excess flux that extends out to ~9 um in Spitzer IRS spectra, where thermal emission from cold, ~100K dust from the system's ring at ~75 AU takes over. Matching imaging ring photometry, we find the excess consists of NIR reflectance from the ring which is as red as that of old, processed comet nuclei, plus a tenuous thermal emission component from close-in, T ~ 850 K circumstellar material evincing an organic plus silicate emission feature complex at 7 - 13 um. Unusual, emission-like features due to atomic Si, S, Ca, and Sr were found at 0.96 - 1.07 um, likely sourced by rocky dust evaporating in the 850 K component. An empirical cometary dust phase function can reproduce the scattered light excess and 1:5 balance of scattered vs. thermal energy for the ring with optical depth Tau > 0.10 in an 8 AU wide belt of 4 AU vertical height and Mdust > 0.1-0.7 M_Mars. Our results are consistent with HR 4796A consisting of a narrow sheparded ring of devolatilized cometary material associated with multiple rocky planetesimal subcores, and a small steady stream of dust inflowing from this belt to a rock sublimation zone at approximately 1 AU from the primary. These subcores were built from comets that have been actively emitting large, reddish dust for > 0.4 Myr at 100K, the temperature at which cometary activity onset is seen in our Solar System.
  • Using the NASA/IRTF SpeX & BASS spectrometers we have obtained novel 0.7 - 13 um observations of the newly imaged HD36546 debris disk system. The SpeX spectrum is most consistent with the photospheric emission expected from an Lstar ~ 20 Lsun, solar abundance A1.5V star with little/no extinction and excess emission from circumstellar dust detectable beyond 4.5 um. Non-detections of CO emission lines and accretion signatures point to the gas poor circumstellar environment of a very old transition disk. Combining the SpeX and BASS spectra with archival WISE/AKARI/IRAS/Herschel photometery, we find an outer cold dust belt at ~135K and 20 - 40 AU from the primary, likely coincident with the disk imaged by Subaru (Currie et al. 2017), and a new second inner belt with temperature ~570K and an unusual, broad SED maximum in the 6 - 9 um region, tracing dust at 1.1 - 2.2 AU. An SED maximum at 6 - 9 um has been reported in just two other A-star systems, HD131488 and HD121191, both of ~10 Myr age (Melis et al. 2013). From Spitzer, we have also identified the ~12 Myr old A7V HD148567 system as having similar 5 - 35 um excess spectral features (Mittal et al. 2015). The Spitzer data allows us to rule out water emission and rule in carbonaceous materials - organics, carbonates, SiC - as the source of the 6 - 9 um excess. Assuming a common origin for the 4 young Astar systems' disks, we suggest they are experiencing an early era of carbon-rich planetesimal processing.
  • The cosmic optical background is an important observable that constrains energy production in stars and more exotic physical processes in the universe, and provides a crucial cosmological benchmark against which to judge theories of structure formation. Measurement of the absolute brightness of this background is complicated by local foregrounds like the Earth's atmosphere and sunlight reflected from local interplanetary dust, and large discrepancies in the inferred brightness of the optical background have resulted. Observations from probes far from the Earth are not affected by these bright foregrounds. Here we analyze data from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) instrument on NASA's New Horizons mission acquired during cruise phase outside the orbit of Jupiter, and find a statistical upper limit on the optical background's brightness similar to the integrated light from galaxies. We conclude that a carefully performed survey with LORRI could yield uncertainties comparable to those from galaxy counting measurements.
  • Haze in Pluto's atmosphere was detected in images by both the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) and the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) on New Horizons. LORRI observed haze up to altitudes of at least 200 km above Pluto's surface at solar phase angles from ~20{\deg} to ~169{\deg}. The haze is structured with about ~20 layers, and the extinction due to haze is greater in the northern hemisphere than at equatorial or southern latitudes. However, more haze layers are discerned at equatorial latitudes. A search for temporal variations found no evidence for motions of haze layers (temporal changes in layer altitudes) on time scales of 2 to 5 hours, but did find evidence of changes in haze scale height above 100 km altitude. An ultraviolet extinction attributable to the atmospheric haze was also detected by the ALICE ultraviolet spectrograph on New Horizons. The haze particles are strongly forward-scattering in the visible, and a microphysical model of haze is presented which reproduces the visible phase function just above the surface with 0.5 {\mu}m spherical particles, but also invokes fractal aggregate particles to fit the visible phase function at 45 km altitude and account for UV extinction. A model of haze layer generation by orographic excitation of gravity waves is presented. This model accounts for the observed layer thickness and distribution with altitude. Haze particles settle out of the atmosphere and onto Pluto's surface, at a rate sufficient to alter surface optical properties on seasonal time scales. Pluto's regional scale albedo contrasts may be preserved in the face of the haze deposition by atmospheric collapse.
  • SPHEREx is a proposed SMEX mission selected for Phase A. SPHEREx will carry out the first all-sky spectral survey and provide for every 6.2" pixel a spectra between 0.75 and 4.18 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$41.4] and 4.18 and 5.00 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$135]. The SPHEREx team has proposed three specific science investigations to be carried out with this unique data set: cosmic inflation, interstellar and circumstellar ices, and the extra-galactic background light. It is readily apparent, however, that many other questions in astrophysics and planetary sciences could be addressed with the SPHEREx data. The SPHEREx team convened a community workshop in February 2016, with the intent of enlisting the aid of a larger group of scientists in defining these questions. This paper summarizes the rich and varied menu of investigations that was laid out. It includes studies of the composition of main belt and Trojan/Greek asteroids; mapping the zodiacal light with unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution; identifying and studying very low-metallicity stars; improving stellar parameters in order to better characterize transiting exoplanets; studying aliphatic and aromatic carbon-bearing molecules in the interstellar medium; mapping star formation rates in nearby galaxies; determining the redshift of clusters of galaxies; identifying high redshift quasars over the full sky; and providing a NIR spectrum for most eROSITA X-ray sources. All of these investigations, and others not listed here, can be carried out with the nominal all-sky spectra to be produced by SPHEREx. In addition, the workshop defined enhanced data products and user tools which would facilitate some of these scientific studies. Finally, the workshop noted the high degrees of synergy between SPHEREx and a number of other current or forthcoming programs, including JWST, WFIRST, Euclid, GAIA, K2/Kepler, TESS, eROSITA and LSST.
  • NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has revealed the complex geology of Pluto and Charon. Pluto's encounter hemisphere shows ongoing surface geological activity centered on a vast basin containing a thick layer of volatile ices that appears to be involved in convection and advection, with a crater retention age no greater than $\approx$10 Ma. Surrounding terrains show active glacial flow, apparent transport and rotation of large buoyant water-ice crustal blocks, and pitting, likely by sublimation erosion and/or collapse. More enigmatic features include tall mounds with central depressions that are conceivably cryovolcanic, and ridges with complex bladed textures. Pluto also has ancient cratered terrains up to ~4 Ga old that are extensionally fractured and extensively mantled and perhaps eroded by glacial or other processes. Charon does not appear to be currently active, but experienced major extensional tectonism and resurfacing (probably cryovolcanic) nearly 4 billion years ago. Impact crater populations on Pluto and Charon are not consistent with the steepest proposed impactor size-frequency distributions proposed for the Kuiper belt.
  • Observations made during the New Horizons flyby provide a detailed snapshot of the current state of Pluto's atmosphere. While the lower atmosphere (at altitudes <200 km) is consistent with ground-based stellar occultations, the upper atmosphere is much colder and more compact than indicated by pre-encounter models. Molecular nitrogen (N$_2$) dominates the atmosphere (at altitudes <1800 km or so), while methane (CH$_4$), acetylene (C$_2$H$_2$), ethylene (C$_2$H$_4$), and ethane (C$_2$H$_6$) are abundant minor species, and likely feed the production of an extensive haze which encompasses Pluto. The cold upper atmosphere shuts off the anticipated enhanced-Jeans, hydrodynamic-like escape of Pluto's atmosphere to space. It is unclear whether the current state of Pluto's atmosphere is representative of its average state--over seasonal or geologic time scales.
  • We present our results on the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observations of the bright Oort Cloud comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS). ISON was observed between 2013 October 31-November 06 during variable speed solar wind (SW), and PanSTARRS was observed between 2013 April 17-23 during fast SW. ISON produced an extended parabolic X-ray morphology consistent with a collisionally thick coma, while PanSTARRS demonstrated only a diffuse X-ray-emitting region. We consider these emissions to be from charge exchange (CX) and model each comet's emission spectrum from first principles accordingly. Our model agrees with the observational spectra and also generates composition ratios for heavy, highly charged SW ions interacting with the cometary atmosphere. We compare our derived SW ion compositions to observational data and find a strong agreement between them. These results further demonstrate the utility of CX emissions as a remote diagnostics tool of both astrophysical plasma interaction and SW composition. In addition, we observe potential soft X-ray emissions via ACIS around 0.2 keV from both comets that are correlated in intensity to the hard X-ray emissions between 0.4-1.0 keV. We fit our CX model to these emissions, but our lack of a unique solution at low energies makes it impossible to conclude if they are cometary CX in origin. We lastly discuss probable emission mechanism sources for the soft X-rays and explore new opportunities these findings present in understanding cometary emission processes via Chandra.
  • We observed Comet C/Siding Spring using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during its close approach to Mars. The high spatial resolution images obtained through the F689M, F775W, and F845M filters reveal the characteristics of the dust coma. The dust production rate of C/Siding Spring, quantified by $Af\rho$, is 590$\pm$30, 640$\pm$30, and 670$\pm$30 cm in a 420 km-radius aperture at 38$^\circ$ solar phase angle through the three filters, respectively, consistent with other observations at similar time and geometry, and with model predictions based on earlier measurements. The dust expansion velocity is ~150-250 m s$^{-1}$ for micron-sized dust grains, similar to the speeds found for other comets. The coma has a color slope of (5.5$\pm$1.5)%/100 nm between 689 and 845 nm, similar to previous HST measurements at comparable aperture sizes, consistent with the lack of color dependence on heliocentric distance for almost all previously observed active comets. The rotational period of the nucleus of C/Siding Spring is determined from the periodic brightness variation in the coma to be 8.00$\pm$0.08 hours, with no excited rotational state detected. The dust coma shows a broad and diffuse fan-shaped feature in the sunward direction, with no temporal morphological variation observed. The projected orientation of the dust feature, combined with the previous analysis of the coma morphology and other characteristics, suggests secular activity evolution of the comet in its inner solar system passage as one previously observed active region turns off whereas new regions exposed to sunlight due to seasonal illumination change.
  • We present analysis of observations of CO2 and OI emission in three comets to measure the CO2 abundance and evaluate the possibility of employing observations of OI emission in comets as a proxy for CO2. We obtained NIR imaging sensitive to CO2 of comets C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS), C/2012 K5 (LINEAR), and 290P/Jager with the IRAC instrument on Spitzer. We acquired observations of OI emission in these comets with the ARCES echelle spectrometer mounted on the 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory and observations of OH with the Swift observatory (PanSTARRS) and with Keck HIRES (Jager). The CO2/H2O ratios derived from the Spitzer images are 12.6 +/- 1.3% (PanSTARRS), 28.9 +/- 3.6% (LINEAR), and 31.3 +/- 4.2% (Jager). These abundances are derived under the assumption that contamination from CO emission is negligible. The CO2 abundance for PanSTARRS is close to the average abundance measured in comets at similar heliocentric distance to date, while the abundances measured for LINEAR and Jager are significantly larger than the average abundance. From the coma morphology observed in PanSTARRS and the assumed gas expansion velocity, we derive a rotation period for the nucleus of about 9.2 hours. Comparison of H2O production rates derived from ARCES and Swift data, as well as other observations, suggest the possibility of sublimation from icy grains in the inner coma. We evaluate the possibility that the OI emission can be employed as a proxy for CO2 by comparing CO2/H2O ratios inferred from the OI lines to those measured directly by Spitzer. We find that for PanSTARRS we can reproduce the observed CO2 abundance to an accuracy of ~20%. For LINEAR and Jager, we were only able to obtain upper limits on the CO2 abundance inferred from the OI lines. These upper limits are consistent with the CO2 abundances measured by Spitzer.
  • The coma of comet 103P/Hartley 2 has a significant population of large particles observed as point sources in images taken by the Deep Impact spacecraft. We measure their spatial and flux distributions, and attempt to constrain their composition. The flux distribution of these particles implies a very steep size distribution with power-law slopes ranging from -6.6 to -4.7. The radii of the particles extend up to 20 cm, and perhaps up to 2 m, but their exact sizes depend on their unknown light scattering properties. We consider two cases: bright icy material, and dark dusty material. The icy case better describes the particles if water sublimation from the particles causes a significant rocket force, which we propose as the best method to account for the observed spatial distribution. Solar radiation is a plausible alternative, but only if the particles are very low density aggregates. If we treat the particles as mini-nuclei, we estimate they account for <16-80% of the comet's total water production rate (within 20.6 km). Dark dusty particles, however, are not favored based on mass arguments. The water production rate from bright icy particles is constrained with an upper limit of 0.1 to 0.5% of the total water production rate of the comet. If indeed icy with a high albedo, these particles do not appear to account for the comet's large water production rate. production rate. Erratum: We have corrected the radii and masses of the large particles of comet 103P/Hartley 2 and present revised conclusions in the attached erratum.
  • We analyze Spitzer IRS spectra of 110 B-, A-, F-, and G-type stars with optically thin infrared excess in the Scorpius-Centaurus (ScoCen) OB association. The age of these stars ranges from 11-17 Myr. We fit the infrared excesses observed in these sources by Spitzer IRS and Spitzer MIPS to simple dust models according to Mie theory. We find that nearly all the objects in our study can be fit by one or two belts of dust. Dust around lower mass stars appears to be closer in than around higher mass stars, particularly for the warm dust component in the two-belt systems, suggesting mass-dependent evolution of debris disks around young stars. For those objects with stellar companions, all dust distances are consistent with trunction of the debris disk by the binary companion. The gaps between several of the two-belt systems can place limits on the planets that might lie between the belts, potentially constraining the mass and locations of planets that may be forming around these stars.
  • Previously proposed mechanisms have difficulty explaining the disruption of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) as it approached the Sun. We describe a novel cometary disruption mechanism whereby comet nuclei fragment and disperse through dynamic sublimation pressure, which induces differential stresses within the interior of the nucleus. When these differential stresses exceed its material strength, the nucleus breaks into fragments. We model the sublimation process thermodynamically and propose that it is responsible for the disruption of Comet ISON. We estimate the bulk unconfined crushing strength of Comet ISON's nucleus and the resulting fragments to be 0.5 Pa and 1-9 Pa respectively, assuming typical Jupiter Family Comet (JFC) albedos. However, if Comet ISON has an albedo similar to Pluto, this strength estimate drops to 0.2 Pa for the intact nucleus and 0.6-4 Pa for its fragments. Regardless of assumed albedo, these are similar to previous strength estimates of JFCs. This suggests that, if Comet ISON is representative of dynamically new comets, then low bulk strength is a primordial property of some comet nuclei, and not due to thermal processing during migration into the Jupiter Family.
  • We present a new analysis of ${\it Spitzer}$ observations of comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 taken on UT 2003 November 21, 23, and 24, similar to a previous investigation of the observations (Stansberry et al. 2004), but using the most recent ${\it Spitzer}$ data pipeline products and intensive image processing techniques. Analysis of images from the IRAC 5.8 & 8.0 $\mu$m bands and the MIPS 24.0 & 70.0 $\mu$m bands resulted in photometry measurements of the nucleus after a suite of coma modeling and removal processes were implemented. SW1 was not identified in the 5.8 $\mu$m image from the previous work so its incorporation into this analysis is entirely new. Using the Near Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (Harris 1998) resulted in a nucleus radius measurement of $R$ = 30.2 $^{+3.7}_{-2.9}$ km and an infrared beaming parameter value of $\eta = 0.99$ $^{+0.26}_{-0.19}$. We also measured an infrared geometric albedo, $p_{5.8}$ = 0.5 $\pm$ 0.5. Extrapolating a 0.04 V-band albedo and using a normalized reflectivity gradient $S' = 14.94 \pm 1.09$ [% (1000 \r{A})$^{-1}$] (Duffard et al. 2014) we recover an infrared albedo of $p_{5.8}$ = 0.31 in the near infrared consistent with the value recovered from thermal modeling. The dust composition extracted from IRS spectra are very comet-like, containing mainly amorphous ferromagnesian silicates (but with a minority of crystalline silicates as well), water ice, and metal sulfides.
  • We describe the discovery of a bright, young Kuiper belt-like debris disk around HD 115600, a $\sim$ 1.4--1.5 M$_\mathrm{\odot}$, $\sim$ 15 Myr old member of the Sco-Cen OB Association. Our H-band coronagraphy/integral field spectroscopy from the \textit{Gemini Planet Imager} shows the ring has a (luminosity scaled) semi major axis of ($\sim$ 22 AU) $\sim$ 48 AU, similar to the current Kuiper belt. The disk appears to have neutral scattering dust, is eccentric (e $\sim$ 0.1--0.2), and could be sculpted by analogues to the outer solar system planets. Spectroscopy of the disk ansae reveal a slightly blue to gray disk color, consistent with major Kuiper belt chemical constituents, where water-ice is a very plausible dominant constituent. Besides being the first object discovered with the next generation of extreme adaptive optics systems (i.e. SCExAO, GPI, SPHERE), HD 115600's debris ring and planetary system provides a key reference point for the early evolution of the solar system, the structure and composition of the Kuiper belt, and the interaction between debris disks and planets.
  • The final assembly of terrestrial planets occurs via massive collisions, which can launch copious clouds of dust that are warmed by the star and glow in the infrared. We report the real-time detection of a debris-producing impact in the terrestrial planet zone around a 35-million year-old solar analog star. We observed a substantial brightening of the debris disk at 3-5 {\mu}m, followed by a decay over a year, with quasi-periodic modulations of the disk flux. The behavior is consistent with the occurrence of a violent impact that produced vapor out of which a thick cloud of silicate spherules condensed that were ground into dust by collisions. These results demonstrate how the time domain can become a new dimension for the study of terrestrial planet formation.
  • The close encounter of Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) with Mars on October 19, 2014 presented an extremely rare opportunity to obtain the first flyby quality data of the nucleus and inner coma of a dynamically new comet. However, the comet's dust tail potentially posed an impact hazard to those spacecraft. To characterize the comet at large heliocentric distances, study its long-term evolution, and provide critical inputs to hazard modeling, we imaged C/Siding Spring with the Hubble Space Telescope when the comet was at 4.58, 3.77, and 3.28 AU from the Sun. The dust production rate, parameterized by the quantity Af$\rho$, was 2500, 2100, and 1700 cm (5000-km radius aperture) for the three epochs, respectively. The color of the dust coma is 5.0$\pm$0.3$\%$/100 nm for the first two epochs, and 9.0$\pm$0.3$\%$/100 nm for the last epoch, and reddens with increasing cometocentric distance out to ~3000 km from the nucleus. The spatial distribution and the temporal evolution of the dust color are most consistent with the existence of icy grains in the coma. Two jet-like dust features appear in the north-northwest and southeast directions projected in the sky plane. Within each epoch of 1-2 hour duration, no temporal variations were observed for either feature, but the PA of the southeastern feature varied between the three epochs by ~30$^\circ$. The dust feature morphology suggests two possible orientations for the rotational pole of the nucleus, (RA, Dec) = (295$^\circ\pm$5$^\circ$, +43$^\circ\pm$2$^\circ$) and (190$^\circ\pm$10$^\circ$, 50$^\circ\pm$5$^\circ$), or their diametrically opposite orientations.
  • Comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) has provided an unprecedented opportunity to observe a bright comet over a wide range of heliocentric distances. We present here Spitzer Space Telescope observations of Hale-Bopp from 2005 and 2008 that show a distinct coma and tail, the presence of which is uncommon given its large heliocentric distance (21.6 AU and 27.2 AU, respectively). The morphology of the dust is compared to dynamical models to understand the activity of the comet. Our analysis shows that the shape of Hale-Bopp's dust tail in these images cannot be explained using the usual Finson-Probstein (solar gravity + solar radiation pressure) dynamical model. Several alternative explanations are explored. The analysis suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is that the dust is being charged by the solar wind, then being affected by the interplanetary magnetic field via the Lorentz force. Though this effect has been explored previously, if correct, this seems to be the first time that the Lorentz force has been required to model a cometary dust tail. The analysis also suggests that Hale-Bopp was actively emitting particles when these images were taken, and the tail characteristics changed between observations.
  • We present polarization images of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on UTC 2013 May 8 (rh = 3.81 AU, Delta = 4.34 AU), when the phase angle was alpha = 12.16 degrees. This phase angle is approximately centered in the negative polarization branch for cometary dust. The region beyond 1000 km from the nucleus shows a negative polarization amplitude of p% -1.6%. Within 1000 km of the nucleus, the polarization position angle rotates to be approximately perpendicular to the scattering plane, with an amplitude p% +2.5%. Such positive polarization has been observed previously as a characteristic feature of cometary jets, and we show that Comet ISON does indeed harbor a jet-like feature. These HST observations of Comet ISON represent the first visible light, imaging polarimetry with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution of a Nearly Isotropic Comet (NIC) beyond 3.8 AU from the Sun at a small phase angle. The observations provide an early glimpse of the properties of the cometary dust preserved in this Oort-cloud comet.
  • We present an analysis of comet activity based on the Spitzer Space Telescope component of the Survey of the Ensemble Physical Properties of Cometary Nuclei. We show that the survey is well suited to measuring the activity of Jupiter-family comets at 3-7 AU from the Sun. Dust was detected in 33 of 89 targets (37 +/- 6%), and we conclude that 21 comets (24 +/- 5%) have morphologies that suggest ongoing or recent cometary activity. Our dust detections are sensitivity limited, therefore our measured activity rate is necessarily a lower limit. All comets with small perihelion distances (q < 1.8 AU) are inactive in our survey, and the active comets in our sample are strongly biased to post-perihelion epochs. We introduce the quantity epsilon-f-rho, intended to be a thermal emission counterpart to the often reported A-f-rho, and find that the comets with large perihelion distances likely have greater dust production rates than other comets in our survey at 3-7 AU from the Sun, indicating a bias in the discovered Jupiter-family comet population. By examining the orbital history of our survey sample, we suggest that comets perturbed to smaller perihelion distances in the past 150 yr are more likely to be active, but more study on this effect is needed.
  • We present the detection of new cometary X-ray emission lines in the 1.0 to 2.0 keV range using a sample of comets observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory and ACIS spectrometer. We have selected 5 comets from the Chandra sample with good signal-to-noise spectra. The surveyed comets are: C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley), 153P/2002 (Ikeya-Zhang), 2P/2003 (Encke), and C/2008 8P (Tuttle). We modeled the spectra with an extended version of our solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission model (Bodewits et al. 2007). Above 1 keV, we find Ikeya-Zhang to have strong emission lines at 1340 and 1850 eV that we identify as being created by solar wind charge exchange lines of Mg XI and Si XIII, respectively, and weaker emission lines at 1470, 1600, and 1950 eV formed by SWCX of Mg XII, Mg XI, and Si XIV, respectively. The Mg XI and XII and Si XIII and XIV lines are detected at a significant level for the other comets in our sample (LS4, MH, Encke, 8P), and these lines promise additional diagnostics to be included in SWCX models. The silicon lines in the 1700 to 2000 eV range are detected for all comets, but with the rising background and decreasing cometary emission, we caution these detections need further confirmation with higher resolution instruments.