• We report HI observations of eight spiral galaxies that are strongly lensing background sources. Our targets were selected from the Sloan WFC (Wide Field Camera) Edge-on Late-type Lens Survey (SWELLS) using the Arecibo, Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, and Green Bank telescopes. We securely detect J1703+2451 at z=0.063 with a signal-to-noise of 6.7 and W50=79+/-13 km/s, obtaining the first detection of HI emission in a strong spiral lens. We measure a mass of M(HI)= 1.77+/-0.06(+0.35/-0.75) x 10^9 M_(sol) for this source. We find that this lens is a normal spiral, with observable properties that are fairly typical of spiral galaxies. For three other sources we did not secure a detection; however, we are able to place strong constraints on the HI masses of those galaxies. The observations for four of our sources were rendered unusable due to strong radio frequency interference.
  • Hydroxyl (OH) is expected to be abundant in diffuse interstellar molecular gas as it forms along with $H_2$ under similar conditions and within a similar extinction range. We have analyzed absorption measurements of OH at 1665 MHz and 1667 MHz toward 44 extragalactic continuum sources, together with the J=1-0 transitions of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO , and C$^{18}$O, and the J=2-1 of $^{12}$CO. The excitation temperature of OH were found to follow a modified log-normal distribution, $ f(T{\rm_{ex}}) \propto \frac{1}{ \sqrt{2\pi}\sigma } \rm{exp}\left[-\frac{[ln(\textit{T}_{ex})-ln(3.4\ K)]^2}{2\sigma^2}\right] $, the peak of which is close to the temperature of the Galactic emission background (CMB+synchron). In fact, 90% of the OH has excitation temperature within 2 K of the Galactic background at the same location, providing a plausible explanation for the apparent difficulty to map this abundant molecule in emission. The opacities of OH were found to be small and peak around 0.01. For gas at intermediate extinctions (A$\rm_V$ $\sim$ 0.05-2 mag), the detection rate of OH with detection limit $N(\mathrm{OH})\simeq 10^{12}$ cm$^{-2}$ is approximately independent of $A\rm_V$. We conclude that OH is abundant in the diffuse molecular gas and OH absorption is a good tracer of `dark molecular gas (DMG)'. The measured fraction of DMG depends on assumed detection threshold of the CO data set. The next generation of highly sensitive low frequency radio telescopes, FAST and SKA, will make feasible the systematic inventory of diffuse molecular gas, through decomposing in velocity the molecular (e.g. OH and CH) absorption profiles toward background continuum sources with numbers exceeding what is currently available by orders of magnitude.
  • As radio polarised emission from astrophysical objects traverse through foreground magnetised plasma, the physical conditions along the lines of sight are encrypted in the form of Rotation Measure (RM). We performed broadband spectro-polarimetric observations of high Rotation Measure (|RM| >~ 300 rad m-2) sources away from the Galactic plane (|b| > 10 deg) selected from the NVSS RM catalogue. The main goals are to verify the NVSS RM values, which could be susceptible to n{\pi}-ambiguity, as well as to identify the origin of the extreme RM values. We show that 40 % of our sample suffer from n{\pi}-ambiguity in the NVSS RM catalogue. There are also hints of RM variabilities over ~20 years epoch for most of our sources, as revealed by comparing the RM values of the two studies in the same frequency ranges after correcting for n{\pi}-ambiguity. At last, we demonstrate the possibility of applying QU-fitting to study the ambient media of AGNs.
  • The content of interstellar clouds, in particular the inventory of diffuse molecular gas, remains uncertain. We identified a sample of isolated clouds, approximately 100 solar masses in size, and used the dust content to estimate the total amount of gas. In Paper 1, the total inferred gas content was found significantly larger than that seen in 21-cm emission measurements of atomic hydrogen. In this paper we test the hypothesis that the apparent excess 'dark' gas is cold atomic hydrogen, which would be evident in absorption but not in emission due to line saturation. The results show there is not enough 21-cm absorption toward the clouds to explain the total amount of 'dark' gas.
  • We have obtained OH spectra of four transitions in the $^2\Pi_{3/2}$ ground state, at 1612, 1665, 1667, and 1720 MHz, toward 51 sightlines that were observed in the Herschel project Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+. The observations cover the longitude range of (32$^\circ$, 64$^\circ$) and (189$^\circ$, 207$^\circ$) in the northern Galactic plane. All of the diffuse OH emissions conform to the so-called 'Sum Rule' of the four brightness temperatures, indicating optically thin emission condition for OH from diffuse clouds in the Galactic plane. The column densities of the HI `halos' N(HI) surrounding molecular clouds increase monotonically with OH column density, N(OH), until saturating when N(HI)=1.0 x 10$^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ and N (OH) $\geq 4.5\times 10^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$, indicating the presence of molecular gas that cannot be traced by HI. Such a linear correlation, albeit weak, is suggestive of HI halos' contribution to the UV shielding required for molecular formation. About 18% of OH clouds have no associated CO emission (CO-dark) at a sensitivity of 0.07 K but are associated with C$^+$ emission. A weak correlation exists between C$^+$ intensity and OH column density for CO-dark molecular clouds. These results imply that OH seems to be a better tracer of molecular gas than CO in diffuse molecular regions.
  • We analyze synthetic neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption and emission spectral lines from a high- resolution, three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation to quantify how well observational methods recover the physical properties of interstellar gas. We present a new method for uniformly decomposing HI spectral lines and estimating the properties of associated gas using the Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD) algorithm. We find that Hi spectral lines recover physical structures in the simulation with excellent completeness at high Galactic latitude, and this completeness declines with decreasing latitude due to strong velocity-blending of spectral lines. The temperature and column density inferred from our decomposition and radiative transfer method agree with the simulated values within a factor of < 2 for the majority of gas structures. We next compare synthetic spectra with observations from the 21-SPONGE survey at the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array using AGD. We find more components per line of sight in 21-SPONGE than in synthetic spectra, which reflects insufficient simulated gas scale heights and the limitations of local box simulations. In addition, we find a significant population of low-optical depth, broad absorption components in the synthetic data which are not seen in 21-SPONGE. This population is not obvious in integrated or per-channel diagnostics, and reflects the benefit of studying velocity-resolved components. The discrepant components correspond to the highest spin temperatures (1000 < Ts < 4000 K), which are not seen in 21-SPONGE despite sufficient observational sensitivity. We demonstrate that our analysis method is a powerful tool for diagnosing neutral ISM conditions, and future work is needed to improve observational statistics and implementation of simulated physics.
  • Neither HI nor CO emission can reveal a significant quantity of so-called dark gas in the interstellar medium (ISM). It is considered that CO-dark molecular gas (DMG), the molecular gas with no or weak CO emission, dominates dark gas. We identified 36 DMG clouds with C$^+$ emission (data from Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+ (GOT C+) project) and HINSA features. Based on uncertainty analysis, optical depth of HI $\tau\rm_{HI}$ of 1 is a reasonable value for most clouds. With the assumption of $\tau\rm_{HI}=1$, these clouds were characterized by excitation temperatures in a range of 20 K to 92 K with a median value of 55 K and volume densities in the range of $6.2\times10^1$ cm$^{-3}$ to $1.2\times 10^3$ cm$^{-3}$ with a median value of $2.3\times 10^2$ cm$^{-3}$. The fraction of DMG column density in the cloud ($f\rm_{DMG}$) decreases with increasing excitation temperature following an empirical relation $f\rm_{DMG}=-2.1\times 10^{-3}T_(ex,\tau_{HI}=1)$+1.0. The relation between $f\rm_{DMG}$ and total hydrogen column density $N_H$ is given by $f\rm_{DMG}$=$1.0-3.7\times 10^{20}/N_H$. The values of $f\rm_{DMG}$ in the clouds of low extinction group ($A\rm_V \le 2.7$ mag) are consistent with the results of the time-dependent, chemical evolutionary model at the age of ~ 10 Myr. Our empirical relation cannot be explained by the chemical evolutionary model for clouds in the high extinction group ($A\rm_V > 2.7$ mag). Compared to clouds in the low extinction group ($A\rm_V \le 2.7$ mag), clouds in the high extinction group ($A\rm_V > 2.7$ mag) have comparable volume densities but excitation temperatures that are 1.5 times lower. Moreover, CO abundances in clouds of the high extinction group ($A\rm_V > 2.7$ mag) are $6.6\times 10^2$ times smaller than the canonical value in the Milky Way. #[Full version of abstract is shown in the text.]#
  • We present constraints on the abundance of carbon-monoxide in the early Universe from the CO Power Spectrum Survey (COPSS). We utilize a data set collected between 2005 and 2008 using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA), which were previously used to measure arcminute-scale fluctuations of the CMB. This data set features observations of 44 fields, covering an effective area of 1.7 square degrees, over a frequency range of 27 to 35 GHz. Using the technique of intensity mapping, we are able to probe the CO(1-0) transition, with sensitivity to spatial modes between $k=0.5{-}2\ h\,\textrm{Mpc}^{-1}$ over a range in redshift of $z=2.3{-}3.3$, spanning a comoving volume of $3.6\times10^{6}\ h^{-3}\,\textrm{Mpc}^{3}$. We demonstrate our ability to mitigate foregrounds, and present estimates of the impact of continuum sources on our measurement. We constrain the CO power spectrum to $P_{\textrm{CO}}<2.6\times10^{4}\ \mu\textrm{K}^{2} (h^{-1}\,\textrm{Mpc})^{3}$, or $\Delta^{2}_{\textrm{CO}}(k\! = \! 1 \ h\,\textrm{Mpc}^{-1})<1.3 \times10^{3}\ \mu\textrm{K}^{2}$, at $95\%$ confidence. This limit resides near optimistic predictions for the CO power spectrum. Under the assumption that CO emission is proportional to halo mass during bursts of active star formation, this corresponds to a limit on the ratio of $\textrm{CO}(1{-}0)$ luminosity to host halo mass of $A_{\textrm{CO}}<1.2\times10^{-5}\ L_{\odot}\ M_{\odot}^{-1}$. Further assuming a Milky Way-like conversion factor between CO luminosity and molecular gas mass ($\alpha_{\textrm{CO}}=4.3\ M_{\odot}\ (\textrm{K}\ \textrm{km}\ \textrm{s}^{-1}\ \textrm{pc}^{-2})^{-1}$), we constrain the global density of molecular gas to $\rho_{z\sim3}(M_{\textrm{H}_{2}})\leq 2.8 \times10^{8}\ M_{\odot}\ \textrm{Mpc}^{-3}$.
  • Using the Planck far-infrared and Arecibo GALFA 21-cm line surveys, we identified a set of isolated interstellar clouds (approximately degree-sized on the sky and comprising 100 solar masses) and assessed the ratio of gas mass to dust mass. Significant variations of the gas-to-dust ratio are found both from cloud to cloud and within regions of individual clouds; within the clouds, the atomic gas per unit dust decreases by more than a factor of 3 compared to the standard gas-to-dust ratio. Three hypotheses are considered. First, the apparently low gas-to-dust ratio could be due to molecular gas. Comparing to Planck CO maps, the brightest clouds have a H2/CO ratio comparable to galactic plane clouds, but a strong lower limit is placed on the ratio for other clouds, such that the required amount of molecular gas is far higher than would be expected based on the CO upper limits. Second, we consider self-absorbed 21-cm lines and find the optical depth must be approximately 3, significantly higher than found from surveys of radio sources. Third, grain properties may change within the clouds: they become more emissive when they are colder, while not utilizing heavy elements that already have their cosmic abundance fully locked into grains. It is possible all three processes are active, and follow-up studies will be required to disentangle them and measure the true total gas and dust content of interstellar clouds.
  • We investigate the impact of high optical depth on the HI saturation observed in the Perseus molecular cloud by using Arecibo HI emission and absorption measurements toward 26 radio continuum sources. The spin temperature and optical depth of individual HI components are derived along each line-of-sight, enabling us to estimate the correction for high optical depth. We examine two different methods for the correction, Gaussian decomposition and isothermal methods, and find that they are consistent (maximum correction factor ~ 1.2) likely due to the relatively low optical depth and insignificant contribution from the diffuse radio continuum emission for Perseus. We apply the correction to the optically thin HI column density on a pixel-by-pixel basis, and find that the total HI mass increases by ~10%. Using the corrected HI column density image and far-infrared data from the IRIS Survey, we then derive the H2 column density on ~0.4 pc scales. For five dark and star-forming sub-regions, the HI surface density is uniform with Sigma_HI ~ 7-9 solar mass/pc2, in agreement with the minimum HI surface density required for shielding H2 against photodissociation. As a result, Sigma_H2/Sigma_HI and Sigma_HI+Sigma_H2 show a tight relation. Our results are consistent with predictions for H2 formation in steady state and chemical equilibrium, and suggest that H2 formation is mainly responsible for the Sigma_HI saturation in Perseus. We also compare the optically thick HI with the observed "CO-dark" gas, and find that the optically thick HI only accounts for ~20% of the "CO-dark" gas in Perseus.
  • A growing body of evidence has been supporting the existence of so-called "dark molecular gas" (DMG), which is invisible in the most common tracer of molecular gas, i.e., CO rotational emission. DMG is believed to be the main gas component of the intermediate extinction region between A$\rm_v$$\sim$0.05-2, roughly corresponding to the self-shielding threshold of H$_2$ and $^{13}$CO. To quantify DMG relative to HI and CO, we are pursuing three observational techniques, namely, HI self-absorption, OH absorption, and TeraHz C$^+$ emission. In this paper, we focus on preliminary results from a CO and OH absorption survey of DMG candidates. Our analysis show that the OH excitation temperature is close to that of the Galactic continuum background and that OH is a good DMG tracer co-existing with molecular hydrogen in regions without CO. Through systematic "absorption mapping" by Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and ALMA, we will have unprecedented, comprehensive knowledge of the ISM components including DMG in terms of their temperature and density, which will impact our understanding of galaxy evolution and star formation profoundly.
  • We present methods and results from "21-cm Spectral Line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA" (21-SPONGE), a large survey for Galactic neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With the upgraded capabilities of the VLA, we reach median root-mean-square (RMS) noise in optical depth of $\sigma_{\tau}=9\times 10^{-4}$ per $0.42\rm\,km\,s^{-1}$ channel for the 31 sources presented here. Upon completion, 21-SPONGE will be the largest HI absorption survey with this high sensitivity. We discuss the observations and data reduction strategies, as well as line fitting techniques. We prove that the VLA bandpass is stable enough to detect broad, shallow lines associated with warm HI, and show that bandpass observations can be combined in time to reduce spectral noise. In combination with matching HI emission profiles from the Arecibo Observatory ($\sim3.5'$ angular resolution), we estimate excitation (or spin) temperatures ($\rm T_s$) and column densities for Gaussian components fitted to sightlines along which we detect HI absorption (30/31). We measure temperatures up to $\rm T_s\sim1500\rm\,K$ for individual lines, showing that we can probe the thermally unstable interstellar medium (ISM) directly. However, we detect fewer of these thermally unstable components than expected from previous observational studies. We probe a wide range in column density between $\sim10^{16}$ and $>10^{21}\rm\,cm^{-2}$ for individual HI clouds. In addition, we reproduce the trend between cold gas fraction and average $\rm T_s$ found by synthetic observations of a hydrodynamic ISM simulation by Kim et al. (2014). Finally, we investigate methods for estimating HI $\rm T_s$ and discuss their biases.
  • We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21cm absorption spectra from the 21cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the HI line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.
  • Winds and supernovae from OB associations create large cavities in the interstellar medium referred to as superbubbles. The Orion molecular clouds are the nearest high mass star-forming region and have created a highly elongated, 20 degree x 45 degree, superbubble. We fit Kompaneets models to the Orion-Eridanus superbubble and find that a model where the Eridanus side of the superbubble is oriented away from the Sun provides a marginal fit. Because this model requires an unusually small scaleheight of 40 pc and has the superbubble inclined 35 degrees from the normal to the Galactic plane, we propose that this model should be treated as a general framework for modelling the Orion-Eridanus superbubble, with a secondary physical mechanism not included in the Kompaneets model required to fully account for the orientation and elongation of the superbubble.
  • (Abridged) Using the Arecibo Observatory we have obtained neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption and emission spectral pairs in the direction of 26 background radio continuum sources in the vicinity of the Perseus molecular cloud. Strong absorption lines were detected in all cases allowing us to estimate spin temperature (T_s) and optical depth for 107 individual Gaussian components along these lines of sight. Basic properties of individual HI clouds (spin temperature, optical depth, and the column density of the cold and warm neutral medium, CNM and WNM) in and around Perseus are very similar to those found for random interstellar lines of sight sampled by the Millennium HI survey. This suggests that the neutral gas found in and around molecular clouds is not atypical. However, lines of sight in the vicinity of Perseus have on average a higher total HI column density and the CNM fraction, suggesting an enhanced amount of cold HI relative to an average interstellar field. Our estimated optical depth and spin temperature are in stark contrast with the recent attempt at using Planck data to estimate properties of the optically thick HI. Only ~15% of lines of sight in our study have a column density weighted average spin temperature lower than 50 K, in comparison with >85% of Planck's sky coverage. The observed CNM fraction is inversely proportional to the optical-depth weighted average spin temperature, in excellent agreement with the recent numerical simulations by Kim et al. While the CNM fraction is on average higher around Perseus relative to a random interstellar field, it is generally low, 10-50%. This suggests that extended WNM envelopes around molecular clouds, and/or significant mixing of CNM and WNM throughout molecular clouds, are present and should be considered in the models of molecule and star formation.
  • We present {\lambda}1.3 mm CARMA observations of dust polarization toward 30 star-forming cores and 8 star-forming regions from the TADPOL survey. We show maps of all sources, and compare the ~2.5" resolution TADPOL maps with ~20" resolution polarization maps from single-dish submillimeter telescopes. Here we do not attempt to interpret the detailed B-field morphology of each object. Rather, we use average B-field orientations to derive conclusions in a statistical sense from the ensemble of sources, bearing in mind that these average orientations can be quite uncertain. We discuss three main findings: (1) A subset of the sources have consistent magnetic field (B-field) orientations between large (~20") and small (~2.5") scales. Those same sources also tend to have higher fractional polarizations than the sources with inconsistent large-to-small-scale fields. We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ~1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. (2) Outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields; although, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in these sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. (3) Finally, even at ~2.5" resolution we see the so-called "polarization hole" effect, where the fractional polarization drops significantly near the total intensity peak. All data are publicly available in the electronic edition of this article.
  • We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to conduct a high-sensitivity survey of neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption in the Milky Way. In combination with corresponding HI emission spectra obtained mostly with the Arecibo Observatory, we detect a widespread warm neutral medium (WNM) component with excitation temperature <Ts>= 7200 (+1800,-1200) K (68% confidence). This temperature lies above theoretical predictions based on collisional excitation alone, implying that Ly-{\alpha} scattering, the most probable additional source of excitation, is more important in the interstellar medium (ISM) than previously assumed. Our results demonstrate that HI absorption can be used to constrain the Ly-{\alpha} radiation field, a critical quantity for studying the energy balance in the ISM and intergalactic medium yet notoriously difficult to model because of its complicated radiative transfer, in and around galaxies nearby and at high redshift.
  • We investigate turbulent properties of the non-star-forming, translucent molecular cloud, MBM16 by applying the statistical technique of a two-dimensional spatial power spectrum (SPS) on the neutral hydrogen (HI) observations obtained by the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI) survey. The SPS, calculated over the range of spatial scales from 0.1 to 17 pc, is well represented with a single power-law function, with a slope ranging from -3.3 to -3.7 and being consistent over the velocity range of MBM16 for a fixed velocity channel thickness. However, the slope varies significantly with the velocity slice thickness, suggesting that both velocity and density contribute to HI intensity fluctuations. By using this variation we estimate the slope of 3D density fluctuations in MBM16 to be -3.7\pm0.2. This is significantly steeper than what has been found for HI in the Milky Way plane, the Small Magellanic Cloud, or the Magellanic Bridge, suggesting that interstellar turbulence in MBM16 is driven on scales >17 pc and that the lack of stellar feedback could be responsible for the steep power spectrum.
  • We present results of 1.3 mm dust polarization observations toward 16 nearby, low-mass protostars, mapped with ~2.5" resolution at CARMA. The results show that magnetic fields in protostellar cores on scales of ~1000 AU are not tightly aligned with outflows from the protostars. Rather, the data are consistent with scenarios where outflows and magnetic fields are preferentially misaligned (perpendicular), or where they are randomly aligned. If one assumes that outflows emerge along the rotation axes of circumstellar disks, and that the outflows have not disrupted the fields in the surrounding material, then our results imply that the disks are not aligned with the fields in the cores from which they formed.
  • We present the results of a comprehensive survey using the Arecibo Observatory for Zeeman splitting of OH lines in OH megamasers (OHMs). A total of seventy-seven sources were observed with the Arecibo telescope. Of these, maser emission could not be detected for eight sources, and two sources were only ambiguously detected. Another twenty-seven sources were detected at low signal-to-noise ratios or with interference that prevented placing any useful limits on the presence of magnetic fields. In twenty-six sources, it was possible to place upper limits on the magnitude of magnetic fields, typically between 10-30 mG. For fourteen sources, the Stokes V spectra exhibit features consistent with Zeeman splitting. Eleven of these fourteen are new detections, and the remaining three are re-detections of Stokes V detections in Robishaw et al. (2008). Among confident new detections, we derive magnetic fields associated with maser regions with magnitudes ranging from 6.1-27.6 mG. The distribution of magnetic field strengths suggests the magnetic fields in OH masing clouds in OHMs are larger than those in Galactic OH masers. The results are consistent with magnetic fields playing a dynamically important role in OH masing clouds in OHMs.
  • The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a cm-wave interferometer in California, comprising 42 antenna elements with 6-m diameter dishes. We characterize the antenna optical accuracy using two-antenna interferometry and radio holography. The distortion of each telescope relative to the average is small, with RMS differences of 1 percent of beam peak value. Holography provides images of dish illumination pattern, allowing characterization of as-built mirror surfaces. The ATA dishes can experience mm-scale distortions across -2 meter lengths due to mounting stresses or solar radiation. Experimental RMS errors are 0.7 mm at night and 3 mm under worst case solar illumination. For frequencies 4, 10, and 15 GHz, the nighttime values indicate sensitivity losses of 1, 10 and 20 percent, respectively. The ATA.s exceptional wide-bandwidth permits observations over a continuous range 0.5 to 11.2 GHz, and future retrofits may increase this range to 15 GHz. Beam patterns show a slowly varying focus frequency dependence. We probe the antenna optical gain and beam pattern stability as a function of focus and observation frequency, concluding that ATA can produce high fidelity images over a decade of simultaneous observation frequencies. In the day, the antenna sensitivity and pointing accuracy are affected. We find that at frequencies greater than 5 GHz, daytime observations greater than 5 GHz will suffer some sensitivity loss and it may be necessary to make antenna pointing corrections on a 1 to 2 hourly basis.
  • To investigate the fundamental principles of H2 formation in a giant molecular cloud (GMC), we derive the HI and H2 surface density (Sigma_HI and Sigma_H2) images of the Perseus molecular cloud on sub-pc scales (~0.4 pc). We use the far-infrared data from the Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey and the V-band extinction image provided by the COMPLETE Survey to estimate the dust column density image of Perseus. In combination with the HI data from the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array HI Survey and an estimate of the local dust-to-gas ratio, we then derive the Sigma_H2 distribution across Perseus. We find a relatively uniform Sigma_HI ~ 6-8 Msun pc^-2 for both dark and star-forming regions, suggesting a minimum HI surface density required to shield H2 against photodissociation. As a result, a remarkably tight and consistent relation is found between Sigma_H2/Sigma_HI and Sigma_HI+Sigma_H2. The transition between the HI- and H2-dominated regions occurs at N(HI)+2N(H2) ~ (8-14) x 10^20 cm^-2. Our findings are consistent with predictions for H2 formation in equilibrium, suggesting that turbulence may not be of primary importance for H2 formation. However, the importance of a warm neutral medium for H2 shielding, an internal radiation field, and the timescale of H2 formation still remain as open questions. We also compare H2 and CO distributions and estimate the fraction of "CO-dark" gas, f_DG ~ 0.3. While significant spatial variations of f_DG are found, we do not find a clear correlation with the mean V-band extinction.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of the local Leo cold cloud (LLCC), a very nearby, very cold cloud in the interstellar medium. Through stellar absorption studies we find that the LLCC is between 11.3 pc and 24.3 pc away, making it the closest known cold neutral medium cloud and well within the boundaries of the local cavity. Observations of the cloud in the 21-cm HI line reveal that the LLCC is very cold, with temperatures ranging from 15 K to 30 K, and is best fit with a model composed of two colliding components. The cloud has associated 100 micron thermal dust emission, pointing to a somewhat low dust-to-gas ratio of 48 x 10^-22 MJy sr^-1 cm^2. We find that the LLCC is too far away to be generated by the collision among the nearby complex of local interstellar clouds, but that the small relative velocities indicate that the LLCC is somehow related to these clouds. We use the LLCC to conduct a shadowing experiment in 1/4 keV X-rays, allowing us to differentiate between different possible origins for the observed soft X-ray background. We find that a local hot bubble model alone cannot account for the low-latitude soft X-ray background, but that isotropic emission from solar wind charge exchange does reproduce our data. In a combined local hot bubble and solar wind charge exchange scenario, we rule out emission from a local hot bubble with an 1/4 keV emissivity greater than 1.1 Snowdens / pc at 3 sigma, 4 times lower than previous estimates. This result dramatically changes our perspective on our local interstellar medium.
  • A re-analysis of the Stokes-parameter spectra obtained of the z=0.692 21 cm absorption line toward 3C 286 shows that our original claimed detection of Zeeman splitting by a line-of-sight magnetic field, B_los = 87 microgauss is incorrect. Because of an insidious software error, what we reported as Stokes V is actually Stokes U: the revised Stokes V spectrum indicates a 3-sigma upper limit of B_los < 17 microgauss. The correct analysis reveals an absorption feature in fractional polarization that is offset in velocity from the Stokes I spectrum by -1.9 km/s. The polarization position-angle spectrum shows a dip that is also significantly offset from the Stokes I feature, but at a velocity that differs slightly from the absorption feature in fractional polarization. We model the absorption feature with 3 velocity components against the core-jet structure of 3C 286. Our chisquare minimization fitting results in components with differing (1) ratios of H I column density to spin temperature, (2) velocity centroids, and (3) velocity dispersions. The change in polarization position angle with frequency implies incomplete coverage of the background jet source by the absorber. It also implies a spatial variation of the polarization position angle across the jet source, which is observed at frequencies higher than the 839.4 MHz absorption frequency. The multi-component structure of the gas is best understood in terms of components with spatial scales of ~100 pc comprised of hundreds of low-temperature (T < 200 K) clouds with linear dimensions of about 1 pc.
  • We present the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI) survey, and its first full data release (DR1). GALFA-HI is a high resolution (~ 4'), large area (13000 deg^2), high spectral resolution (0.18 km/s), wide band (-700 < v_LSR < +700 km/s) survey of the Galactic interstellar medium in the 21-cm line hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen conducted at Arecibo Observatory. Typical noise levels are 80 mK RMS in an integrated 1 km/s channel. GALFA-HI is a dramatic step forward in high-resolution, large-area Galactic HI surveys, and we compare GALFA-HI to past, present, and future Galactic HI surveys. We describe in detail new techniques we have developed to reduce these data in the presence of fixed pattern noise, gain variation, and inconsistent beam shapes, and we show how we have largely mitigated these effects. We present our first full data release, covering 7520 square degrees of sky and representing 3046 hours of integration time, and discuss the details of these data.