• We present radio observations of 18 MIPSGAL bubbles performed at 5 GHz (6 cm) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in configuration B and BnA. The observations were aimed at understanding what kind of information high-resolution and high-sensitivity radio maps can supply on the circumstellar envelopes of different kinds of evolved stars and what their comparison with infrared images with similar resolution can tell us. We found that the 18 bubbles can be grouped into five categories according to their radio morphology. The three bubbles presenting a central point source in the radio images all correspond to luminous blue variable star candidates. Eleven bubbles show an elliptical shape and the total lack of a central object in the radio, and are likely associated with planetary nebulae. Under this assumption we derive their distance, their ionized mass and their distribution on the Galactic plane. We discuss the possibility that the MIPSGAL bubbles catalogue (428 objects) may contain a large fraction of all Galactic planetary nebulae located at a distance between 1.4 kpc and 6.9 kpc and lying in the MIPSGAL field of view. Among the remaining bubbles we identify also a H II region and a proto-planetary nebula candidate.
  • We present radio observations of two supernova remnants and four planetary nebulae with the Very Large Array and the Green Bank Telescope. These objects are part of a larger sample of radio sources, discussed in a previous paper, counterpart of the MIPSGAL 24-micron compact bubbles. For the two supernova remnants we combined the interferometric observations with single-dish data to obtain both a high resolution and a good sensitivity to extended structures. We discuss in detail the entire combination procedure adopted and the reliability of the resulting maps. For one supernova remnant we pose a more stringent upper limit for the flux density of its undetected pulsar, and we also show prominent spectral index spatial variations, probably due to inhomogeneities in the magnetic field and in its ejecta or to an interaction between the supernova shock and molecular clouds. We eventually use the 5-GHz maps of the four planetary nebulae to estimate their distance and their ionized mass.
  • We report the radio observations of a sub-sample of the 428 galactic compact bubbles discovered at 24 $\mu$m with the MIPSGAL survey. Pervasive through the entire Galactic plane, these objects are thought to be different kinds of evolved stars. The very large majority of the bubbles (~ 70%) are however not yet classified. We conducted radio observations with the EVLA at 6 cm and 20 cm in order to obtain the spectral index of 55 bubbles. We found that at least 70 per cent of the 31 bubbles for which we were effectively able to compute the spectral index (or its lower limit) are likely to be thermal emitters. We were also able to resolve some bubbles, obtaining that the size of the radio nebula is usually similar to the IR size, although our low resolution (with respect to IR images) did not allow further morphological studies. Comparisons between radio flux densities and IR archive data from Spitzer and IRAS suggest that at least 3 unclassified bubbles can be treated as planetary nebula candidates.
  • The nebulae associated to four Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been observed at 5.5 and 9 GHz using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, and radio emission has been detected for first time in these sources, R127, R143, S61 and S119. The radio maps of the nebulae have an angular resolution of \sim 1.5" and a sensitivity of 1.5-3.0\times10-2 mJy beam-1, and show a very similar morphology to that observed in H{\alpha}. This similarity permit us to assume that the H{\alpha} emission is not affected by strong intrinsic extinction due to dust within the nebulae. We estimate the masses of the ionized gas in the LBVs nebulae and their values are consistent with those measured in Galactic LBVs.
  • We present some preliminary results from our program of intensive near-infrared photometric monitoring of a sample of confirmed and candidate Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) conducted from 2008 to 2010. Clear long-term variability has been observed for Wray 17-96 and V481 Sct, with overall brightness variation greater than 1 mag in the J band. Other sources, such as LBV 1806-20 showed detectable variability with amplitudes of few tenths of a magnitude with time-scale of about 60 days.