• We introduce an entirely new class of high-order methods for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based on the Gaussian Process (GP) family of stochastic functions. Our approach is to use kernel-based GP prediction methods to interpolate/reconstruct high-order approximations for solving hyperbolic PDEs. We present the GP approach as a new formulation of high-order (magneto)hydrodynamic state variable interpolation that furnishes an alternative to conventional polynomial-based approaches.
  • Proton radiography is an important diagnostic method for laser plasma experiments, and is particularly important in the analysis of magnetized plasmas. The theory of radiographic image analysis has heretofore only permitted somewhat limited analysis of the radiographs of such plasmas. We furnish here a theory that remedies this deficiency. We show that to linear order in magnetic field gradients, proton radiographs are projection images of the MHD current along the proton trajectories. We demonstrate that in the linear approximation, the full structure of the perpedicular magnetic field can be reconstructed by solving a steady-state inhomogeneous 2-dimensional diffusion equation sourced by the radiograph fluence contrast data. We explore limitations of the inversion method due to Poisson noise, to discretization errors, to radiograph edge effects, and to obstruction by laser target structures. We also provide a separate analysis that is well-suited to the inference of isotropic-homogeneous magnetic turbulence spectra. We discuss extension of these results to the nonlinear contrast regime.
  • The gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies of the GRB rate usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously flown GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we develop a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image threshold. Our simulations show that adopting the complex trigger algorithm of Swift increases the detection rate of dim bursts. As a result, our simulations suggest bursts need to be dimmer than previously expected to avoid over-producing the number of detections and to match with Swift observations. Moreover, our results indicate that these dim bursts are more likely to be high redshift events than low-luminosity GRBs. This would imply an even higher cosmic GRB rate at large redshifts than previous expectations based on star-formation rate measurements, unless other factors, such as the luminosity evolution, are taken into account. The GRB rate from our best result gives a total number of 4571^{+829}_{-1584} GRBs per year that are beamed toward us in the whole universe. SPECIAL NOTE (2015.05.16): This new version incorporates an erratum. All the GRB rate normalizations ($R_{\rm GRB}(z=0)$) should be a factor of 2 smaller than previously reported. Please refer to the Appendix for more details. We sincerely apologize for the mistake.
  • The Biermann Battery effect is frequently invoked in cosmic magnetogenesis and studied in High-Energy Density laboratory physics experiments. Generation of magnetic fields by the Biermann effect due to mis-aligned density and temperature gradients in smooth flow <i>behind</i> shocks is well known. We show that a Biermann-effect magnetic field is also generated <i>within</i> shocks. Direct implementation of the Biermann effect in MHD codes does not capture this physical process, and worse, produces unphysical magnetic fields at shocks whose value does not converge with resolution. We show that this convergence breakdown is due to naive discretization, which fails to account for the fact that discretized irrotational vector fields have spurious solenoidal components that grow without bound near a discontinuity. We show that careful consideration of the kinetics of ion viscous shocks leads to a formulation of the Biermann effect that gives rise to a convergent algorithm. We note two novel physical effects: a <i>resistive magnetic precursor</i> in which Biermann-generated field in the shock "leaks" resistively upstream; and a <i>thermal magnetic precursor</i>, in which field is generated by the Biermann effect ahead of the shock front due to gradients created by the shock's electron thermal conduction precursor. Both effects appear to be potentially observable in experiments at laser facilities. We re-examine published studies of magnetogenesis in galaxy cluster formation, and conclude that the simulations in question had inadequate resolution to reliably estimate the field generation rate. Corrected estimates suggest primordial field values in the range $B\sim 10^{-22}$G --- $10^{-19}$G by $z=3$.
  • We apply the mathematical formalism of vector spherical harmonics decomposition to convective stellar velocity fields from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations, and show that the resulting power spectra furnish a robust and stable statistical description of stellar convective turbulence. Analysis of the power spectra help identify key physical parameters of the convective process such as the dominant scale of the turbulent motions that influence the structure of massive evolved pre-supernova stars. We introduce the numerical method that can be used to calculate vector spherical harmonics power spectra from 2D and 3D convective shell simulation data. Using this method we study the properties of oxygen shell burning and convection for a 15 Msun star simulated by the hydrodynamics code FLASH in 2D and 3D. We discuss the importance of realistic initial conditions to achieving successful core-collapse supernova explosions in multi-dimensional simulations. We show that the calculated power spectra can be used to generate realizations of the velocity fields of pre-supernova convective shells. We find that the slope of the solenoidal mode power spectrum remains mostly constant throughout the evolution of convection in the oxygen shell in both 2D and 3D simulations. We also find that the characteristic radial scales of the convective elements are smaller in 3D than in 2D while the angular scales are larger in 3D.
  • We present a systematic study of the pure deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae using three-dimensional, high-resolution, full-star hydrodynamical simulations, nucleosynthetic yields calculated using Lagrangian tracer particles, and light curves calculated using radiation transport. We evaluate the simulations by comparing their predicted light curves with many observed SNe Ia using the SALT2 data-driven model and find that the simulations may correspond to under-luminous SNe Iax. We explore the effects of the initial conditions on our results by varying the number of randomly selected ignition points from 63 to 3500, and the radius of the centered sphere they are confined in from 128 to 384 km. We find that the rate of nuclear burning depends on the number of ignition points at early times, the density of ignition points at intermediate times, and the radius of the confining sphere at late times. The results depend primarily on the number of ignition points, but we do not expect this to be the case in general. The simulations with few ignition points release more nuclear energy $E_{\mathrm{nuc}}$, have larger kinetic energies $E_{\mathrm{K}}$, and produce more $^{56}$Ni than those with many ignition points, and differ in the distribution of $^{56}$Ni, Si, and C/O in the ejecta. For these reasons, the simulations with few ignition points exhibit higher peak B-band absolute magnitudes $M_\mathrm{B}$ and light curves that rise and decline more quickly; their $M_\mathrm{B}$ and light curves resemble those of under-luminous SNe Iax, while those for simulations with many ignition points are not.
  • We explore Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) for radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking Monte Carlo particles through optically thick materials. DDMC accelerates IMC in diffusive domains. Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally grey DDMC method. We rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. This formulation includes an analysis that yields an additional factor in the standard IMC-to-DDMC spatial interface condition. To our knowledge the new boundary condition is distinct from others presented in prior DDMC literature. The method is suitable for a variety of opacity distributions and may be applied to semi-relativistic radiation transport in simple fluids and geometries. Additionally, we test the code, called SuperNu, using an analytic solution having static material, as well as with a manufactured solution for moving material with structured opacities. Finally, we demonstrate with a simple source and 10 group logarithmic wavelength grid that IMC-DDMC performs better than pure IMC in terms of accuracy and speed when there are large disparities between the magnitudes of opacities in adjacent groups. We also present and test our implementation of the new boundary condition.
  • Self-gravity computation by multipole expansion is a common approach in problems such as core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae, where single large condensations of mass must be treated. The standard formulation of multipole self-gravity suffers from two significant sources of error, which we correct in the formulation presented in this article. The first source of error is due to the numerical approximation that effectively places grid cell mass at the central point of the cell, then computes the gravitational potential at that point, resulting in a convergence failure of the multipole expansion. We describe a new scheme that avoids this problem by computing gravitational potential at cell faces. The second source of error is due to sub-optimal choice of location for the expansion center, which results in angular power at high multipole $l$ values in the gravitational field, requiring a high --- and expensive --- value of multipole cutoff \lmax. By introducing a global measure of angular power in the gravitational field, we show that the optimal coordinate for the expansion is the square-density-weighted mean location. We subject our new multipole self-gravity algorithm to two rigorous test problems: MacLaurin spheroids for which exact analytic solutions are known, and core-collapse supernovae. We show that key observables of the core-collapse simulations, particularly shock expansion, proto-neutron star motion, and momentum conservation, are extremely sensitive to the accuracy of the multipole gravity, and the accuracy of their computation is greatly improved by our reformulated solver.
  • The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously flown GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we developed a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image trigger threshold. We use this program to search for the intrinsic GRB rate. Our simulations show that adopting the complex trigger algorithm of Swift increases the detection rate of dim bursts. As a result, we find that either the GRB rate is much higher than previously expected at large redshift, or the luminosity evolution is non-negligible. We will discuss the best results of the GRB rate in our search, and their impact on the star-formation history.
  • We propose a robust, quantitative method to compare the synthetic light curves of a Type Ia Supernova (SNIa) explosion model with a large set of observed SNeIa, and derive a figure of merit for the explosion model's agreement with observations. The synthetic light curves are fit with the data-driven model SALT2 which returns values for stretch, color, and magnitude at peak brightness, as well as a goodness-of-fit parameter. Each fit is performed multiple times with different choices of filter bands and epoch range in order to quantify the systematic uncertainty on the fitted parameters. We use a parametric population model for the distribution of observed SNIa parameters from large surveys, and extend it to represent red, dim, and bright outliers found in a low-redshift SNIa data set. We discuss the potential uncertainties of this population model and find it to be reliable given the current uncertainties on cosmological parameters. Using our population model, we assign each set of fitted parameters a likelihood of being observed in nature, and a figure of merit based on this likelihood. We define a second figure of merit based on the quality of the light curve fit, and combine the two measures into an overall figure of merit for each explosion model. We compute figures of merit for a variety of 1D, 2D and 3D explosion models and show that our evaluation method allows meaningful inferences across a wide range of light curve quality and fitted parameters.
  • A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of alpha-particle nuclei, including Ni56, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to Ni56 occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion time scale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the alpha-particle nuclei, including Ni56, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter rho_up/v_down, where rho_up is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v_down is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v_down depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.
  • The 2002 discovery of the "Amati Relation" of GRB spectra created the possibility that this and other correlations of GRB phenomenology might be used to make GRBs into standard candles. One recurring apparent difficulty with this program has been that some of the primary observational quantities to be fit as "data" - the isotropic-equivalent prompt energy $E_{iso}$ and the collimation-corrected "total" prompt energy energy $E_{\gamma}$ - depend for their construction on the very cosmological models that they are supposed to help constrain. This is the so-called "circularity problem" of standard candle GRBs. This paper is intended to point out that the circularity problem is not in fact a problem at all, except to the extent that it amounts to a self-inflicted wound. It arises essentially because of an unfortunate choice of data variables, such as $E_{iso}$, which are unnecessarily model-dependent. If, instead, the empirical correlations of GRB phenomenology which are formulated in source-variables are {\it mapped to the primitive observational variables} (such as fluence) and compared to the observations in that space, then all circularity disappears. I also indicate here a set of procedures for encoding high-dimensional empirical correlations in a "Gaussian Tube" smeared model that includes both the correlation and its intrinsic scatter, and how that source-variable model may easily be mapped to the space of primitive observables and fashioned into a likelihood. I discuss the projections of such Gaussian tubes into sub-spaces, which may be used to incorporate data from GRB events that may lack some element of the data (for example, GRBs without ascertained jet-break times). In this way, a large set of inhomogeneously observed GRBs may be assimilated into a single analysis, so long as each possesses at least two correlated data attributes.
  • GRB 041006 was detected by HETE-2 at 12:18:08 UT on 06 October 2004. This GRB displays a soft X-ray emission, a precursor before the onset of the main event, and also a soft X-ray tail after the end of the main peak. The light curves in four different energy bands display different features; At higher energy bands several peaks are seen in the light curve, while at lower energy bands a single broader bump dominates. It is expected that these different features are the result of a mixture of several components each of which has different energetics and variability. To reveal the nature of each component, we analysed the time resolved spectra and they are successfully resolved into several components. We also found that these components can be classified into two distinct classes; One is a component which has an exponential decay of $E_{p}$ with a characteristic timescale shorter than $\sim$ 30 sec, and its spectrum is well represented by a broken power law function, which is frequently observed in many prompt GRB emissions, so it should have an internal-shock origin. Another is a component whose $E_{p}$ is almost unchanged with characteristic timescale longer than $\sim$ 60 sec, and shows a very soft emission and slower variability. The spectrum of the soft component is characterized by either a broken power law or a black body spectrum. This component might originate from a relatively wider and lower velocity jet or a photosphere of the fireball. By assuming that the soft component is a thermal emission, the radiation radius is initially $4.4 \times 10^{6}$ km, which is a typical radius of a blue supergiant, and its expansion velocity is $2.4 \times 10^{5}$ km/s in the source frame.
  • A long X-ray flash was detected and localized by the instruments aboard the High Energy Transient Explorer II (HETE-2) at 00:03:30 UT on 2004 September 16. The position was reported to the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) approximately 2 hours after the burst. This burst consists of two peaks separated by 200 s, with durations of 110 s and 60 s. We have analyzed the energy spectra of the 1st and 2nd peaks observed with the Wide Field X-Ray Monitor (WXM) and the French Gamma Telescope (FREGATE). We discuss the origin of the 2nd peak in terms of flux variabilities and timescales. We find that it is most likely part of the prompt emission, and is explained by the long-acting engine model. This feature is similar to some bright X-ray flares detected in the early afterglow phase of bursts observed by the Swift satellite.
  • GRB 051022 was detected at 13:07:58 on 22 October 2005 by HETE-2. The location of GRB 051022 was determined immediately by the flight localization system. This burst contains multiple pulses and has a rather long duration of about 190 seconds. The detections of candidate X-ray and radio afterglows were reported, whereas no optical afterglow was found. The optical spectroscopic observations of the host galaxy revealed the redshift z = 0.8. Using the data derived by HETE-2 observation of the prompt emission, we found the absorption N_H = 8.8 -2.9/+3.1 x 10^22 cm^-2 and the visual extinction A_V = 49 -16/+17 mag in the host galaxy. If this is the case, no detection of any optical transient would be quite reasonable. The absorption derived by the Swift XRT observations of the afterglow is fully consistent with those obtained from the early HETE-2 observation of the prompt emission. Our analysis implies an interpretation that the absorbing medium could be outside external shock at R ~ 10^16 cm, which may be a dusty molecular cloud.
  • The traditional design of trigger algorithms for GRB experiments requires the specification of the background and burst samples in terms of acquisition times that are of fixed duration and of fixed elapsed time from each other. One such set of acquisition times is required for each characteristic timescale of GRB variation that one desires to detect. One then slides each set through the trigger data searching for samples that maximize the signal-to-noise of the background-subtracted burst sample. Here we describe a new triggering approach in which the times at which the background and burst samples are acquired are allowed to vary dynamically. Two background samples bracket a burst sample. The background and burst durations and elapsed time between them are allowed to be free parameters, which are maximized using the downhill simplex method. This produces great flexibility in the timescales that are available for detecting GRBs.
  • We describe a new method of transient point source localization for coded-aperture X-ray detectors that we have applied to data from the HETE Wide-Field X-Ray Monitor (WXM). The method is based upon the calculation of the likelihood function and its interpretation as a probability density for the transient source location by an application of Bayes' Theorem. The method gives a point estimate of the source location by finding the maximum of this probability density, and credible regions for the source location by choosing suitable contours of constant probability density. We describe the application of this method to data from the WXM, and give examples of GRB localizations which illustrate the results that can be obtained using this method.
  • We exploit the 14 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts $z$ and the 7 GRBs for which there are constraints on $z$ to determine the GRB rate $R_{\rm GRB}(z)$, using a method based on Bayesian inference. We find that, despite the qualitative differences between the observed GRB rate and estimates of the SFR in the universe, current data are consistent with $R_{\rm GRB}(z)$ being proportional to the SFR.
  • We use the possible Cepheid-like luminosity estimator for the long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) developed by Reichart et al. (2000) to estimate the intrinsic luminosity, and thus the redshift, of 907 long-duration GRBs from the BATSE 4B catalog. We describe a method based on Bayesian inference which allows us to infer the intrinsic GRB burst rate as a function of redshift for bursts with estimated intrinsic luminosities and redshifts. We apply this method to the above sample of long-duration GRBs, and present some preliminary results.
  • BATSE, Ulysses, and TGRS and KONUS on WIND detected four gamma-ray events within 1.8 days during 1996 October 27-29, consistent with coming from the same location on the sky. We assess the evidence that these events may be due to a series of bursts from a single source by calculating the probability that such a clustering in position and in time of occurrence might happen by chance. The calculation of this probability is afflicted by the usual problem of a posteriori statistics. We introduce a clustering statistic, which is formed from the "minimum circle radius" (i.e. the radius of the smallest circle that just encloses the positions of all the events) and the minimum time lapse (i.e. the time elapsed between the first and last event). We also introduce a second clustering statistic, which is formed from the "cluster likelihood function" and the minimum time lapse. We show that the use of these statistics largely eliminates the "a posteriori" nature of the problem. The two statistics yield significances of the clustering of $3.3\times 10^{-4}$ and $3.1\times 10^{-5}$, respectively, if we interpret the four events as four bursts, whereas the clustering is not significant if we interpret the four events as only three bursts. However, in the latter case one of the bursts is the longest ever observed by BATSE.
  • We present a new method of transient point source deconvolution for coded-aperture X-Ray detectors. Our method is based upon the calculation of the likelihood function and its interpretation as a probability density for the transient source position by an application of Bayes' Theorem. The method obtains point estimates of source positions by finding the maximum of this probability density, and interval estimates of prescribed probability by choosing suitable contours of constant probability density. We give the results of simulations that we performed to test the method. We also derive approximate analytic expressions for the predicted performance of the method. These estimates underline the intuitively plausible properties of the method and provide a sound quantitative basis for the design of coded-aperture systems.
  • We analyze the systematic errors in the positions of bursts in the BATSE 1B, 2B and 3B catalogs, using a likelihood approach. We use the BATSE data in conjunction with 196 single IPN arcs. We assume circular Gaussian errors, and that the total error is the sum in quadrature of the systematic error $\sigma_{\rm sys}$ and statistical error $\sigma_{\rm stat}$, as prescribed by the BATSE catalog. We find that the 3B burst positions are inconsistent with the value $\sigma_{\rm sys} = 1.6^\circ$ stated in the BATSE 3B catalog.
  • We develop a likelihood methodology which can be used to search for evidence of burst repetition in the BATSE catalog, and to study the properties of the repetition signal. We use a simplified model of burst repetition in which a number $N_{\rm r}$ of sources which repeat a fixed number of times $N_{\rm rep}$ are superposed upon a number $N_{\rm nr}$ of non-repeating sources. The instrument exposure is explicitly taken into account. By computing the likelihood for the data, we construct a probability distribution in parameter space that may be used to infer the probability that a repetition signal is present, and to estimate the values of the repetition parameters. The likelihood function contains contributions from all the bursts, irrespective of the size of their positional errors --- the more uncertain a burst's position is, the less constraining is its contribution. Thus this approach makes maximal use of the data, and avoids the ambiguities of sample selection associated with data cuts on error circle size. We present the results of tests of the technique using synthetic data sets.
  • We study the resonant divergences that occur in quantum scattering cross-sections in the presence of a strong external magnetic field. We demonstrate that all such divergences may be eliminated by introducing radiative corrections to the leading-order scattering amplitudes. These corrections impose a choice of basis states that must be used in scattering calculations: electron states must diagonalize the mass operator, while photon states must diagonalize the polarization operator. The radiative corrections introduce natural line-widths into the energy denominators of all propagators, as well as into the time-development exponentials of all scattering states corresponding to external lines. Since initial and final scattering states may now decay, it is logically necessary to compute scattering amplitudes for a finite time-lapse between the preparation of the initial state and the measurement of the final state. Strict energy conservation, which appeared in previous formulations of the theory, must thus be abandoned. We exhibit the generic formulae for the scattering cross-sections in two useful limits, corresponding to the cases where either the initial states or the final states are stable, and discuss the application of the general formula when neither of these limits applies.