• We study the production of sterile neutrinos in supernovae, focusing in particular on the keV--MeV mass range, which is the most interesting range if sterile neutrinos are to account for the dark matter in the Universe. Focusing on the simplest scenario in which sterile neutrinos mixes only with muon or tau neutrino, we argue that the production of keV--MeV sterile neutrinos can be strongly enhanced by a Mikheyev--Smirnov--Wolfenstein (MSW) resonance, so that a substantial flux is expected to emerge from a supernova, even if vacuum mixing angles between active and sterile neutrinos are tiny. Using energetics arguments, this yields limits on the sterile neutrino parameter space that reach down to mixing angles of the order of $\sin^2 2\theta \lesssim 10^{-14}$ and are up to an order of magnitude stronger than those from X-ray observations. While supernova limits suffer from larger systematic uncertainties than X-ray limits they apply also to scenarios in which sterile neutrinos are not abundantly produced in the early Universe. We also compute the flux of $\mathcal{O}(\text{MeV})$ photons expected from the decay of sterile neutrinos produced in supernovae, but find that it is beyond current observational reach even for a nearby supernova.
  • We describe nuFATE Neutrino Fast Attenuation Through Earth, a very rapid method of accurately computing the attenuation of high-energy neutrinos during their passage through Earth to detectors such as IceCube, ANTARES or KM3Net, including production of secondary neutrinos from $\tau^\pm$ lepton decay. We then use this method to quantify the error on attenuation due to uncertainties in the isotropic neutrino spectrum, the composition of the Earth, and the parton distribution functions. We show that these can be as large as 20%, which can significantly impact reconstructed astrophysical neutrino parameters, as well as searches for new physics. An implementation of this algorithm is provided as a public code.
  • We study the phenomenology of neutrino decay together with neutrino oscillations in the context of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. We review the formalism of visible neutrino decay in which one of the decay products is a neutrino that potentially can be observed. We apply the formalism developed for decay to the recent sterile neutrino search performed by IceCube with TeV neutrinos. We show that for $\nu_4$ lifetime $\tau_4/m_4 \lesssim 10^{-16} {\rm eV^{-1}s}$, the interpretation of the high-energy IceCube analysis can be significantly changed.
  • We show that the high-energy cosmic neutrinos seen by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory can be used to probe interactions between neutrinos and the dark sector that cannot be reached by current cosmological methods. The origin of the observed neutrinos is still unknown, and their arrival directions are compatible with an isotropic distribution. This observation, together with dedicated studies of Galactic plane correlations, suggest a predominantly extragalactic origin. Interactions between this isotropic extragalactic flux and the dense dark matter (DM) bulge of the Milky Way would thus lead to an observable imprint on the distribution, which would be seen by IceCube as 1) slightly suppressed fluxes at energies below a PeV and 2) a deficit of events in the direction of the Galactic center. We perform an extended unbinned likelihood analysis using the four-year high-energy starting event dataset to constrain the strength of DM-neutrino interactions for two model classes. We find that, in spite of low statistics, IceCube can probe regions of the parameter space inaccessible to current cosmological methods.
  • We consider non-abelian kinetic mixing between the Standard Model SU(2$)_L$ and a dark sector U(1$)^\prime$ gauge group associated with the presence of a scalar SU(2$)_L$ triplet. The magnitude of the resulting dark photon coupling $\epsilon$ is determined by the ratio of the triplet vacuum expectation value, constrained to by $\lsim 4$ GeV by electroweak precision tests, to the scale $\Lambda$ of the effective theory. The corresponding effective operator Wilson coefficient can be $\mathcal{O}(1)$ while accommodating null results for dark photon searches, allowing for a distinctive LHC dark photon phenomenology. After outlining the possible LHC signatures, we illustrate by recasting current ATLAS dark photon results into the non-abelian mixing context.
  • The high-energy astrophysical neutrinos recently discovered by IceCube opened a new way to test Lorentz and CPT violation through the astrophysical neutrino mixing properties. The flavor ratio of astrophysical neutrinos is a very powerful tool to investigate tiny effects caused by Lorentz and CPT violation. There are 3 main findings; (1) current limits on Lorentz and CPT violation in neutrino sector are not tight and they allow for any flavor ratios, (2) however, the observable flavor ratio on the Earth is tied with the flavor ratio at production, this means we can test both the presence of new physics and the astrophysical neutrino production mechanism simultaneously, and (3) the astrophysical neutrino flavor ratio is one of the most stringent tests of Lorentz and CPT violation.
  • Astrophysical neutrinos are powerful tools to investigate the fundamental properties of particle physics through their flavor content. In this paper, we perform the first general new physics study on ultra high energy neutrino flavor content by introducing effective operators. We find that at the current limits on these operators, new physics terms cause maximal effects on the flavor content, however, the flavor content at Earth is confined to a region related to the assumed initial flavor content. Furthermore, we conclude that a precise measure of the flavor content at Earth will provide orders of magnitude improvement on new physics bounds. Finally, we discuss the current best fits of flavor content of the IceCube data and their interplay with new physics scenarios.
  • We propose searching for deep underground cavities of different densities in the Earth's crust using a long-baseline electron-antineutrino disappearance experiment, realized through a low-energy beta-beam with highly-enhanced luminosity. We focus on four cases: cavities with densities close to that of water, iron-banded formations, heavier mineral deposits, and regions of abnormal charge accumulation that have been posited to appear prior to the occurrence of an intense earthquake. The sensitivity to identify cavities attains confidence levels higher than $3\sigma$ and $5\sigma$ for exposures times of 3 months and 1.5 years, respectively, and cavity densities below 1 g cm$^{-3}$ or above 5 g cm$^{-3}$, with widths greater than 200 km. We reconstruct the cavity density, width, and position, assuming one of them known while keeping the other two free. We obtain large allowed regions that improve as the cavity density differs more from the Earth's mean density. Furthermore, we demonstrate that knowledge of the cavity density is important to obtain O(10%) error on the width. Finally, we introduce an observable to quantify the presence of a cavity by changing the orientation of the electron-antineutrino beam, with which we are able to identify the presence of a cavity at the $2\sigma$ to $5\sigma$ C.L.
  • By combining the color dipole model of the nucleon with the assumption that cross sections behave asymptotically as $\ln^2(s)$, we are able to describe the data for photon, neutrino and hadron interactions with protons at all energies, $s$ is the center-of-mass energy of the interacting particles. Specifically, we extrapolate the perturbative QCD calculations into the regime of small fractional parton momenta $x$ using a color dipole description of the proton target that guarantees an asymptotic $\ln^2(s)$ behavior of all cross sections. The ambiguity of introducing a parametrization associated with the dipole approximation is mitigated by the requirement that the saturation of the small-$x$ structure functions produces $\ln^2(s)$-behaved asymptotic cross sections, in agreement with the data. The same formalism allows us to calculate the cross section for the hadronic pair production of charm particles. The results, in particular those for the high-energy neutrino and charm cross sections, are relevant for evaluating the sensitivity as well as the background in neutrino telescopes.
  • Image photometry reveals that the F ring is approximately twice as bright during the Cassini tour as it was during the Voyager flybys of 1980 and 1981. It is also three times as wide and has a higher integrated optical depth. We have performed photometric measurements of more than 4,800 images of Saturn's F ring taken over a five-year period with Cassini's Narrow Angle Camera. We show that the ring is not optically thin in many observing geometries and apply a photometric model based on single-scattering in the presence of shadowing and obscuration, deriving a mean effective optical depth tau = 0.033. Stellar occultation data from Voyager PPS and Cassini VIMS validate both the optical depth and the width measurements. In contrast to this decades-scale change, the baseline properties of the F ring have not changed significantly from 2004 to 2009. However, we have investigated one major, bright feature that appeared in the ring in late 2006. This transient feature increased the ring's overall mean brightness by 84% and decayed with a half-life of 91 days.