• We consider the status of black hole solutions with non-trivial scalar fields but no gauge fields, in four dimensional asymptotically flat space-times, reviewing both classical results and recent developments. We start by providing a simple illustration on the physical difference between black holes in electro-vacuum and scalar-vacuum. Next, we review no-scalar-hair theorems. In particular, we detail an influential theorem by Bekenstein and stress three key assumptions: 1) the type of scalar field equation; 2) the spacetime symmetry inheritance by the scalar field; 3) an energy condition. Then, we list regular (on and outside the horizon), asymptotically flat BH solutions with scalar hair, organizing them by the assumption which is violated in each case and distinguishing primary from secondary hair. We provide a table summary of the state of the art.
  • Black hole (BH) shadows in dynamical binary BHs (BBHs) have been produced via ray-tracing techniques on top of expensive fully non-linear numerical relativity simulations. We show that the main features of these shadows are captured by a simple quasi-static resolution of the photon orbits on top of the static double-Schwarzschild family of solutions. Whilst the latter contains a conical singularity between the line separating the two BHs, this produces no major observable effect on the shadows, by virtue of the underlying cylindrical symmetry of the problem. This symmetry is also present in the stationary BBH solution comprising two Kerr BHs separated by a massless strut. We produce images of the shadows of the exact stationary co-rotating (even) and counter-rotating (odd) stationary BBH configurations. This allow us to assess the impact on the binary shadows of the intrinsic spin of the BHs, contrasting it with the effect of the orbital angular momentum.
  • We study the horizon geometry of Kerr black holes (BHs) with scalar synchronised hair, a family of solutions of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon system that continuously connects to vacuum Kerr BHs. We identify the region in parameter space wherein a global isometric embedding in Euclidean 3-space, $\mathbb{E}^3$, is possible for the horizon geometry of the hairy BHs. For the Kerr case, such embedding is possible iff the horizon dimensionless spin $j_H$ (which equals the total dimensionless spin, $j$), the sphericity $\mathfrak{s}$ and the horizon linear velocity $v_H$ are smaller than critical values, $j^{\rm (S)},\mathfrak{s}^{\rm (S)}, v_H^{\rm (S)}$, respectively. For the hairy BHs, we find that $j_H<j^{\rm (S)}$ is a sufficient, but not necessary, condition for being embeddable; $v<v_H^{\rm (S)}$ is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for being embeddable; whereas $\mathfrak{s}<\mathfrak{s}^{\rm (S)}$ is a necessary and sufficient condition for being embeddable in $\mathbb{E}^3$. Thus the latter quantity provides the most faithful diagnosis for the existence of an $\mathbb{E}^3$ embedding within the whole family of solutions. We also observe that sufficiently hairy BHs are always embeddable, even if $j$ -- which for hairy BHs (unlike Kerr BHs) differs from $j_H$ --, is larger than unity.
  • Kerr black holes with synchronised hair [arXiv:1403.2757, arXiv:1603.02687] are a counter example to the no hair conjecture, in General Relativity minimally coupled to simple matter fields (with mass $\mu$) obeying all energy conditions. Since these solutions have, like Kerr, an ergoregion it has been a lingering possibility that they are afflicted by the superradiant instability, the same process that leads to their dynamical formation from Kerr. A recent breakthrough [arXiv:1711.08464] confirmed this instability and computed the corresponding timescales for a sample of solutions. We discuss how these results and other observations support two conclusions: $1)$ starting from the Kerr limit, the increase of hair for fixed coupling $\mu M$ (where $M$ is the BH mass) increases the timescale of the instability; $2)$ there are hairy solutions for which this timescale, for astrophysical black hole masses, is larger than the age of the Universe. The latter conclusion introduces the limited, but physically relevant concept of effective stability. The former conclusion, allows us to identify an astrophysically viable domain of such effectively stable hairy black holes, occurring, conservatively, for $M\mu \lesssim 0.25$. These are hairy BHs that form dynamically, from the superradiant instability of Kerr, within an astrophysical timescale, but whose own superradiant instability occurs only in a cosmological timescale.
  • We obtain spinning boson star solutions and hairy black holes with synchronised hair in the Einstein-Klein-Gordon model, wherein the scalar field is massive, complex and with a non-minimal coupling to the Ricci scalar. The existence of these hairy black holes in this model provides yet another manifestation of the universality of the synchronisation mechanism to endow spinning black holes with hair. We study the variation of the physical properties of the boson stars and hairy black holes with the coupling parameter between the scalar field and the curvature, showing that they are, qualitatively, identical to those in the minimally coupled case. By discussing the conformal transformation to the Einstein frame, we argue that the solutions herein provide new rotating boson star and hairy black hole solutions in the minimally coupled theory, with a particular potential, and that no spherically symmetric hairy black hole solutions exist in the non-minimally coupled theory, under a condition of conformal regularity.
  • Highly spinning Kerr black holes with masses $M = 1 - 100\ M_{\odot}$ are subject to an efficient superradiant instability in the presence of bosons with masses $\mu \sim 10^{-10} - 10^{-12}\ {\rm eV}$. We observe that this matches the effective plasma-induced photon mass in diffuse galactic or intracluster environments ($\omega_{\rm pl} \sim 10^{-10} - 10^{-12}\ {\rm eV}$). This suggests that bare Kerr black holes within galactic or intracluster environments, possibly even including the ones produced in recently observed gravitational wave events, are unstable to formation of a photon cloud that may contain a significant fraction of the mass of the original black hole. At maximal efficiency, the instability timescale for a massive vector is milliseconds, potentially leading to a transient rate of energy extraction from a black hole in principle as large as $\sim 10^{55} \ {\rm erg \, s}^{-1}$. We discuss possible astrophysical effects this could give rise to, including a speculative connection to Fast Radio Bursts.
  • We perform fully non-linear numerical simulations within the spherically symmetric Einstein-(complex)Proca system. Starting with Proca field distributions that obey the Hamiltonian, momentum and Gaussian constraints, we show that the self-gravity of the system induces the formation of compact objects, which, for appropriate initial conditions, asymptotically approach stationary soliton-like solutions known as Proca stars. The excess energy of the system is dissipated by the mechanism of \textit{gravitational cooling} in analogy to what occurs in the dynamical formation of scalar boson stars. We investigate the dependence of this process on the phase difference between the real and imaginary parts of the Proca field, as well as on their relative amplitudes. Within the timescales probed by our numerical simulations the process is qualitatively insensitive to either choice: the phase difference and the amplitude ratio are conserved during the evolution. Thus, whereas a truly stationary object is expected to be approached only in the particular case of equal amplitudes and opposite phases, quasi-stationary compact solitonic objects are, nevertheless, formed in the general case.
  • There is an exciting prospect of obtaining the shadow of astrophysical black holes (BHs) in the near future with the Event Horizon Telescope. As a matter of principle, this justifies asking how much one can learn about the BH horizon itself from such a measurement. Since the shadow is determined by a set of special photon orbits, rather than horizon properties, it is possible that different horizon geometries yield similar shadows. One may then ask how sensitive is the shadow to details of the horizon geometry? As a case study, we consider the double Schwarzschild BH and analyse the impact on the lensing and shadows of the conical singularity that holds the two BHs in equilibrium -- herein taken to be a strut along the symmetry axis in between the two BHs. Whereas the conical singularity induces a discontinuity of the scattering angle of photons, clearly visible in the lensing patterns along the direction of the strut's location, it produces no observable effect on the shadows, whose edges remain everywhere smooth. The latter feature is illustrated by examples including both equal and unequal mass BHs. This smoothness contrasts with the intrinsic geometry of the (spatial sections of the) horizon of these BHs, which is not smooth, and provides a sharp example on how BH shadows are insensitive to some horizon geometry details. This observation, moreover, suggests that for the study of their shadows, this static double BH system may be an informative proxy for a dynamical binary.
  • It has been recently observed that a scalar field with Robin boundary conditions (RBCs) can trigger both a superradiant and a bulk instability for a BTZ black hole (BH). To understand the generality and scrutinize the origin of this behavior, we consider here the superradiant instability of a Kerr BH confined either in a mirror-like cavity or in AdS space, triggered also by a scalar field with RBCs. These boundary conditions are the most general ones that ensure the cavity/AdS space is an isolated system, and include, as a particular case, the commonly considered Dirichlet boundary conditions (DBCs). Whereas the superradiant modes for some RBCs differ only mildly from the ones with DBCs, in both cases we find that as we vary the RBCs, the imaginary part of the frequency may attain arbitrarily large positive values. We interpret this growth as being sourced by a bulk instability of both confined geometries when certain RBCs are imposed to either the mirror-like cavity or the AdS boundary, rather than by energy extraction from the BH, in analogy with the BTZ behavior.
  • For ultra compact objects (UCOs), Light Rings (LRs) and Fundamental Photon Orbits (FPOs) play a pivotal role in the theoretical analysis of strong gravitational lensing effects, and of BH shadows in particular. In this short review, specific models are considered to illustrate how FPOs can be useful in order to understand some non-trivial gravitational lensing effects. This paper aims at briefly overviewing the theoretical foundations of these effects, touching also some of the related phenomenology, both in General Relativity (GR) and alternative theories of gravity, hopefully providing some intuition and new insights for the underlying physics, which might be critical when testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis.
  • We show the existence of superradiant modes of massive scalar fields propagating in BTZ black holes when certain Robin boundary conditions, which never include the commonly considered Dirichlet boundary conditions, are imposed at spatial infinity. These superradiant modes are defined as those solutions whose energy flux across the horizon is towards the exterior region. Differently from rotating, asymptotically flat black holes, we obtain that not all modes which grow up exponentially in time are superradiant; for some of these, the growth is sourced by a bulk instability of AdS3, triggered by the scalar field with Robin boundary conditions, rather than by energy extraction from the BTZ black hole. Thus, this setup provides an example wherein Bosonic modes with low frequency are pumping energy into, rather than extracting energy from, a rotating black hole.
  • The characteristic damping times of the natural oscillations of a Kerr black hole become arbitrarily large as the extremal limit is approached. This behavior is associated with the so-called zero damped modes (ZDMs), and suggests that extremal black holes are characterized by quasinormal modes whose frequencies are purely real. Since these frequencies correspond to oscillations whose angular phase velocity matches the horizon angular velocity of the black hole, they are sometimes called "synchronous frequencies". Several authors have studied the ZDMs for near-extremal black holes. Recently, their correspondence to branch points of the Green's function of the wave equation was linked to the Aretakis instability of extremal black holes. Here we investigate the existence of ZDMs for extremal black holes, showing that these real-axis resonances of the field are unphysical as natural black hole oscillations: the corresponding frequency is always associated with a scattering mode. By analyzing the behavior of these modes near the event horizon we obtain new insight into the transition to extremality, including a simple way to understand the Aretakis instability.
  • The existence of localized, approximately stationary, lumps of the classical gravitational and electromagnetic field -- $geons$ -- was conjectured more than half a century ago. If one insists on exact stationarity, topologically trivial configurations in electro-vacuum are ruled out by no-go theorems for solitons. But stationary, asymptotically flat geons found a realization in scalar-vacuum, where everywhere non-singular, localized field lumps exist, known as (scalar) boson stars. Similar geons have subsequently been found in Einstein-Dirac theory and, more recently, in Einstein-Proca theory. We identify the common conditions that allow these solutions, which may also exist for other spin fields. Moreover, we present a comparison of spherically symmetric geons for the spin $0,1/2$ and $1$, emphasising the mathematical similarities and clarifying the physical differences, particularly between the bosonic and fermonic cases. We clarify that for the fermionic case, Pauli's exclusion principle prevents a continuous family of solutions for a fixed field mass; rather only a discrete set exists, in contrast with the bosonic case.
  • We prove the following theorem: axisymmetric, stationary solutions of the Einstein field equations formed from classical gravitational collapse of matter obeying the null energy condition, that are everywhere smooth and ultracompact (i.e., they have a light ring) must have at least two light rings, and one of them is stable. It has been argued that stable light rings generally lead to nonlinear spacetime instabilities. Our result implies that smooth, physically and dynamically reasonable ultracompact objects are not viable as observational alternatives to black holes whenever these instabilities occur on astrophysically short time scales. The proof of the theorem has two parts: (i) We show that light rings always come in pairs, one being a saddle point and the other a local extremum of an effective potential. This result follows from a topological argument based on the Brouwer degree of a continuous map, with no assumptions on the spacetime dynamics, and hence it is applicable to any metric gravity theory where photons follow null geodesics. (ii) Assuming Einstein's equations, we show that the extremum is a local minimum of the potential (i.e., a stable light ring) if the energy-momentum tensor satisfies the null energy condition.
  • We establish the existence of stationary clouds of massive test scalar fields around BTZ black holes. These clouds are zero-modes of the superradiant instability and are possible when Robin boundary conditions (RBCs) are considered at the AdS boundary. These boundary conditions are the most general ones that ensure the AdS space is an isolated system, and include, as a particular case, the commonly considered Dirichlet or Neumann-type boundary conditions (DBCs or NBCs). We obtain an explicit, closed form, resonance condition, relating the RBCs that allow the existence of normalizable (and regular on and outside the horizon) clouds to the system's parameters. Such RBCs never include pure DBCs or NBCs. We illustrate the spatial distribution of these clouds, their energy and angular momentum density for some cases. Our results show that BTZ black holes with scalar hair can be constructed, as the non-linear realization of these clouds.
  • East and Pretorius (arXiv:1704.04791) have successfully evolved, using fully non-linear numerical simulations, the superradiant instability of the Kerr black hole (BH) triggered by a massive, complex vector field. Evolutions terminate in stationary states of a vector field condensate synchronised with a rotating BH horizon. We show these end points are fundamental states of Kerr BHs with synchronised Proca hair. Motivated by the "experimental data" from these simulations we suggest a universal (i.e. field-spin independent), analytic model for the subset of BHs with sychronised hair that possess a quasi-Kerr horizon, applicable in the weak hair regime. Comparing this model with fully non-linear numerical solutions of BHs with synchronised scalar or Proca hair, we show the model is accurate for hairy BHs that may emerge dynamically from superradiance, whose domain we identify.
  • We study the shadows of the fully non-linear, asymptotically flat Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet (EdGB) black holes (BHs), for both static and rotating solutions. We find that, in all cases, these shadows are smaller than for comparable Kerr BHs, i.e. with the same total mass and angular momentum under similar observation conditions. In order to compare both cases we provide quantitative shadow parameters, observing in particular that the differences in the shadows mean radii are never larger than the percent level. Therefore, generically, EdGB BHs cannot be excluded by (near future) shadow observations alone. On the theoretical side, we find no clear signature of some exotic features of EdGB BHs on the corresponding shadows, such as the regions of negative (Komar, say) energy density outside the horizon. We speculate that this is due to the fact that the Komar energy interior to the light rings (or more precisely, the surfaces of constant radial coordinate that intersect the light rings in the equatorial plane) is always smaller than the ADM mass, and consequently the corresponding shadows are smaller than those of comparable Kerr BHs. The analysis herein provides a clear example that it is the light ring impact parameter, rather than its "size", that determines a BH shadow.
  • We explicitly construct static black hole solutions to the fully non-linear, D=4, Einstein-Maxwell-AdS equations that have no continuous spatial symmetries. These black holes have a smooth, topologically spherical horizon (section), but without isometries, and approach, asymptotically, global AdS spacetime. They are interpreted as bound states of a horizon with the Einstein-Maxwell-AdS solitons recently discovered, for appropriate boundary data. In sharp contrast with the uniqueness results for Minkowski electrovacuum, the existence of these black holes shows that single, equilibrium, BH solutions in AdS-electrovacuum admit an arbitrary multipole structure.
  • We construct electrically charged Kerr black holes (BHs) with scalar hair. Firstly, we take an uncharged scalar field, interacting with the electromagnetic field only indirectly, via the background metric. The corresponding family of solutions, dubbed Kerr-Newman BHs with ungauged scalar hair, reduces to (a sub-family of) Kerr-Newman BHs in the limit of vanishing scalar hair and to uncharged rotating boson stars in the limit of vanishing horizon. It adds one extra parameter to the uncharged solutions: the total electric charge. This leading electromagnetic multipole moment is unaffected by the scalar hair and can be computed by using Gauss's law on any closed 2-surface surrounding (a spatial section of) the event horizon. By contrast, the first sub-leading electromagnetic multipole -- the magnetic dipole moment --, gets suppressed by the scalar hair, such that the gyromagnetic ratio is always smaller than the Kerr-Newman value ($g=2$). Secondly, we consider a gauged scalar field and obtain a family of Kerr-Newman BHs with gauged scalar hair. The electrically charged scalar field now stores a part of the total electric charge, which can only be computed by applying Gauss' law at spatial infinity and introduces a new solitonic limit -- electrically charged rotating boson stars. In both cases, we analyse some physical properties of the solutions.
  • A central feature of the most elementary rotating black hole (BH) solution in General Relativity is the Kerr bound, which, for vacuum Kerr BHs, can be expressed either in terms of the ADM or the horizon "charges". This bound, however, is not a fundamental properties of General Relativity and stationary, asymptotically flat, regular (on and outside an event horizon) BHs are known to violate the Kerr bound, both in terms of their ADM and horizon quantities. Examples include the recently discovered Kerr BHs with scalar or Proca hair. Here, we point the fact that the Kerr bound in terms of horizon quantities is also violated by well-known rotating and charged solutions, known in closed form, such as the Kerr-Newman and Kerr-Sen BHs. For the former, moreover, we observe that the Reissner-Nordstrom (RN) bound is also violated in terms of horizon quantities, even in the static (i.e RN) limit. For the latter, by contrast, the existence of charged matter outside the horizon, allows a curious invariance of the charge to mass ratio, between ADM and horizon quantities. Regardless of the Kerr bound violation, we show that in all case, the event horizon linear velocity never exceeds the speed of light. Finally, we suggest a new type of informative parameterization for BH spacetimes where part of the asymptotic charges is supported outside the horizon.
  • For an observer, the Black Hole (BH) shadow is the BH's apparent image in the sky due to the gravitational lensing of nearby radiation, emitted by an external source. A recent class of solutions dubbed Kerr BHs with scalar hair possess smaller shadows than the corresponding Kerr BHs and, under some conditions, novel exotic shadow shapes can arise. Thus, these hairy BHs could potentially provide new shadow templates for future experiments such as the Event Horizon Telescope. In order to obtain the shadows, the backward ray-tracing algorithm is briefly introduced, followed by numerical examples of shadows of Kerr BHs with scalar hair contrasting with the Kerr analogues. Additionally, an analytical solution for the Kerr shadow is derived in closed form for a ZAMO observer at an arbitrary position.
  • Self-interacting boson stars have been shown to alleviate the astrophysically low maximal mass of their non-self-interacting counterparts. We report some physical features of spinning self-interacting boson stars, namely their compactness, the occurence of ergo-regions and the scalar field profiles, for a sample of values of the coupling parameter. The results agree with the general picture that these boson stars are comparatively less compact than the non-self-interacting ones. We also briefly discuss the effect of scalar self-interactions on the properties of Kerr black holes with scalar hair.
  • Using backwards ray tracing, we study the shadows of Kerr black holes with scalar hair (KBHsSH). KBHsSH interpolate continuously between Kerr BHs and boson stars (BSs), so we start by investigating the lensing of light due to BSs. Moving from the weak to the strong gravity region, BSs - which by themselves have no shadows - are classified, according to the lensing produced, as: $(i)$ non-compact, which yield no multiple images; $(ii)$ compact, which produce an increasing number of Einstein rings and multiple images of the whole celestial sphere; $(iii)$ ultra-compact, which possess light rings, yielding an infinite number of images with (we conjecture) a self-similar structure. The shadows of KBHsSH, for Kerr-like horizons and non-compact BS-like hair, are analogous to, but distinguishable from, those of comparable Kerr BHs. But for non-Kerr-like horizons and ultra-compact BS-like hair, the shadows of KBHsSH are drastically different: novel shapes arise, sizes are considerably smaller and multiple shadows of a single BH become possible. Thus, KBHsSH provide quantitatively and qualitatively new templates for ongoing (and future) very large baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of BH shadows, such as those of the Event Horizon Telescope.
  • The maximal ADM mass for (mini-)boson stars (BSs) -- gravitating solitons of Einstein's gravity minimally coupled to a free, complex, mass $\mu$, Klein-Gordon field -- is $M_{\rm ADM}^{\rm max}\sim M_{Pl}^2/\mu$. Adding quartic self-interactions to the scalar field theory, described by the Lagrangian $\mathcal{L}_I=\lambda |\Psi|^4$, the maximal ADM mass becomes $M_{\rm ADM}^{\rm max}\sim \sqrt{\lambda}M_{Pl}^3/\mu^2$. Thus, for mini-BSs, astrophysically interesting masses require ultra-light scalar fields, whereas self-interacting BSs can reach such values for bosonic particles with Standard Model range masses. We investigate how these same self-interactions affect Kerr black holes with scalar hair (KBHsSH) [1], which can be regarded as (spinning) BSs in stationary equilibrium with a central horizon. Remarkably, whereas the ADM mass scales in the same way as for BSs, the \textit{horizon mass} $M_H$ does not increases with the coupling $\lambda$, and, for fixed $\mu$, it is maximized at the "Hod point", corresponding to the extremal Kerr black hole obtained in the vanishing hair limit. This mass is always $M_{\rm H}^{\rm max }\sim M_{\rm Pl}^2/\mu$. Thus, introducing these self-interactions, the black hole spacetimes may become considerably "hairier" but the trapped regions cannot become "heavier". We present evidence this observation also holds in a model with $\mathcal{L}_I= \beta|\Psi|^6-\lambda|\Psi|^4$; if it extends to \textit{general} scalar field models, KBHsSH with astrophysically interesting horizon masses \textit{require} ultra-light scalar fields. Their existence, therefore, would be a smoking gun for such (beyond the Standard Model) particles.
  • We establish that massive complex Abelian vector fields (mass $\mu$) can form gravitating solitons, when minimally coupled to Einstein's gravity. Such Proca stars (PSs) have a stationary, everywhere regular and asymptotically flat geometry. The Proca field, however, possesses a harmonic time dependence (frequency $w$), realizing Wheeler's concept of geons for an Abelian spin 1 field. We obtain PSs with both a spherically symmetric (static) and an axially symmetric (stationary) line element. The latter form a countable number of families labelled by an integer $m\in \mathbb{Z}^+$. PSs, like (scalar) boson stars, carry a conserved Noether charge, and are akin to the latter in many ways. In particular, both types of stars exist for a limited range of frequencies and there is a maximal ADM mass, $M_{max}$, attained for an intermediate frequency. For spherically symmetric PSs (rotating PSs with $m=1,2,3$), $M_{max}\simeq 1.058 M_{Pl}^2/\mu$ ($M_{max}\simeq 1.568,\, 2.337, \, 3.247 \, M_{Pl}^2/\mu$), slightly larger values than those for (mini-)boson stars. We establish perturbative stability for a subset of solutions in the spherical case and anticipate a similar conclusion for fundamental modes in the rotating case. The discovery of PSs opens many avenues of research, reconsidering five decades of work on (scalar) boson stars, in particular as possible dark matter candidates.