• We perform a complete study of the gravitational lensing effect beyond the Born approximation on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies using a multiple-lens raytracing technique through cosmological N-body simulations of the DEMNUni suite. The impact of second order effects accounting for the non-linear evolution of large-scale structures is evaluated propagating for the first time the full CMB lensing jacobian together with the light rays trajectory. We carefully investigate the robustness of our approach against several numerical effects in the raytracing procedure and in the N-body simulation itself, and find no evidence of large contaminations. We discuss the impact of beyond-Born corrections on lensed CMB observables, and compare our results with recent analytical predictions that appeared in the literature, finding a good agreement, and extend these results to smaller angular scales. We measure the gravitationally-induced CMB polarization rotation that appears at second order, and compare this result with the latest analytical predictions. We then present the detection prospect of beyond-Born effects with the future CMB-S4 experiment. We show that corrections to the temperature power spectrum can be measured only if a good control of the extragalactic foregrounds is achieved. Conversely, the beyond-Born corrections on E and B-modes power spectra will be much more difficult to detect.
  • The main effect of massive neutrinos on the large-scale structure consists in a few percent suppression of matter perturbations on all scales below their free-streaming scale. Such effect is of particular importance as it allows to constraint the value of the sum of neutrino masses from measurements of the galaxy power spectrum. In this work, we present the first measurements of the next higher-order correlation function, the bispectrum, from N-body simulations that include massive neutrinos as particles. This is the simplest statistics characterising the non-Gaussian properties of the matter and dark matter halos distributions. We investigate, in the first place, the suppression due to massive neutrinos on the matter bispectrum, comparing our measurements with the simplest perturbation theory predictions, finding the approximation of neutrinos contributing at quadratic order in perturbation theory to provide a good fit to the measurements in the simulations. On the other hand, as expected, a linear approximation for neutrino perturbations would lead to O($f_{\nu}$) errors on the total matter bispectrum at large scales. We then attempt an extension of previous results on the universality of linear halo bias in neutrino cosmologies, to non-linear and non-local corrections finding consistent results with the power spectrum analysis.
  • The clustering ratio is defined as the ratio between the correlation function and the variance of the smoothed overdensity field. In LCDM cosmologies not accounting for massive neutrinos, it has already been proved to be independent from bias and redshift space distortions on a range of linear scales. It therefore allows for a direct comparison of measurements (from galaxies in redshift space) to predictions (for matter in real space). In this paper we first extend the applicability of such properties of the clustering ratio to cosmologies that include massive neutrinos, by performing tests against simulated data. We then investigate the constraining power of the clustering ratio when cosmological parameters such as the total neutrino mass and the equation of state of dark energy are left free. We analyse the joint posterior distribution of the parameters that must satisfy, at the same time, the measurements of the galaxy clustering ratio in the SDSS DR12, and the angular power spectrum of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB measured by the Planck satellite. We find the clustering ratio to be very sensitive to the CDM density parameter, but not very much so to the total neutrino mass. Lastly, we forecast the constraining power the clustering ratio will achieve with forthcoming surveys, predicting the amplitude of its errors in a Euclid-like galaxy survey. In this case, we find it is expected to improve the constraint at 95% level on the CDM density by 40% and on the total neutrino mass by 14%.
  • The set-up of the initial conditions in cosmological N-body simulations is usually implemented by rescaling the desired low-redshift linear power spectrum to the required starting redshift consistently with the Newtonian evolution of the simulation. The implementation of this practical solution requires more care in the context of massive neutrino cosmologies, mainly because of the non-trivial scale-dependence of the linear growth that characterises these models. In this work we consider a simple two-fluid, Newtonian approximation for cold dark matter and massive neutrinos perturbations that can reproduce the cold matter linear evolution predicted by Boltzmann codes such as CAMB or CLASS with a 0.1% accuracy or below for all redshift relevant to nonlinear structure formation. We use this description, in the first place, to quantify the systematic errors induced by several approximations often assumed in numerical simulations, including the typical set-up of the initial conditions for massive neutrino cosmologies adopted in previous works. We then take advantage of the flexibility of this approach to rescale the late-time linear power spectra to the simulation initial redshift, in order to be as consistent as possible with the dynamics of the N-body code and the approximations it assumes. We implement our method in a public code providing the initial displacements and velocities for cold dark matter and neutrino particles that will allow accurate, i.e. one-percent level, numerical simulations for this cosmological scenario.
  • We present, for the first time in the literature, a full reconstruction of the total (linear and non-linear) ISW/Rees-Sciama effect in the presence of massive neutrinos, together with its cross-correlations with CMB-lensing and weak-lensing signals. The present analyses make use of all-sky maps extracted via ray-tracing across the gravitational potential distribution provided by the "Dark Energy and Massive Neutrino Universe" (DEMNUni) project, a set of large-volume, high-resolution cosmological N-body simulations, where neutrinos are treated as separate collisionless particles. We correctly recover, at $1-2\%$ accuracy, the linear predictions from CAMB. Concerning the CMB-lensing and weak-lensing signals, we also recover, with similar accuracy, the signal predicted by Boltzmann codes, once non-linear neutrino corrections to Halofit are accounted for. Interestingly, in the ISW/Rees-Sciama signal, and its cross correlation with lensing, we find an excess of power with respect to the massless case, due to free streaming neutrinos, roughly at the transition scale between the linear and non-linear regimes. The excess is $\sim 5-10\%$ at $l\sim 100$ for the ISW/Rees-Sciama auto power spectrum, depending on the total neutrino mass $M_\nu$, and becomes a factor of $\sim 4$ for $M_\nu=0.3$ eV, at $l\sim 600$, for the ISW/Rees-Sciama cross power with CMB-lensing. This effect should be taken into account for the correct estimation of the CMB temperature bispectrum in the presence of massive neutrinos.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • (abridged) We analyse the clustering features of Large Scale Structures (LSS) in the presence of massive neutrinos, employing a set of large-volume, high-resolution cosmological N-body simulations, where neutrinos are treated as a separate collisionless fluid. The volume of 8$\cGpc$, combined with a resolution of about $8\times 10^{10}\Ms$ for the cold dark matter (CDM) component, represents a significant improvement over previous N-body simulations in massive neutrino cosmologies. We show that most of the nonlinear evolution is generated exclusively by the CDM component. We find that accounting only for the nonlinear evolution of the CDM power spectrum allows to recover the total matter power spectrum with the same accuracy as the massless case. Indeed, we show that, the most recent version of the \halofit\ formula calibrated on $\Lambda$CDM simulations can be applied directly to the linear CDM power spectrum without requiring additional fitting parameters in the massive case. As a second step, we study the abundance and clustering properties of CDM halos, confirming that, in massive neutrino cosmologies, the proper definition of the halo bias should be made with respect to the {\em cold} rather than the {\em total} matter distribution, as recently shown in the literature. Here we extend these results to the redshift space, finding that, when accounting for massive neutrinos, an improper definition of the linear bias can lead to a systematic error of about 1-$2 \%$ in the determination of the linear growth rate from anisotropic clustering. This result is quite important if we consider that future spectroscopic galaxy surveys, as \eg\ Euclid, are expected to measure the linear growth-rate with statistical errors less than about $3 \%$ at $z\lesssim1$.
  • We provide constraints on the accuracy with which the neutrino mass fraction, $f_{\nu}$, can be estimated when exploiting measurements of redshift-space distortions, describing in particular how the error on neutrino mass depends on three fundamental parameters of a characteristic galaxy redshift survey: density, halo bias and volume. In doing this, we make use of a series of dark matter halo catalogues extracted from the BASICC simulation. The mock data are analysed via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis. We find a fitting function that well describes the dependence of the error on bias, density and volume, showing a decrease in the error as the bias and volume increase, and a decrease with density down to an almost constant value for high density values. This fitting formula allows us to produce forecasts on the precision achievable with future surveys on measurements of the neutrino mass fraction. For example, a Euclid-like spectroscopic survey should be able to measure the neutrino mass fraction with an accuracy of $\delta f_{\nu} \approx 6.7\times10^{-4}$, using redshift-space clustering once all the other cosmological parameters are kept fixed to the $\Lambda$CDM case.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Future galaxy redshift surveys aim at probing the clustering of the cosmic large-scale structure with unprecedented accuracy, thus complementing cosmic microwave background experiments in the quest to deliver the most precise and accurate picture ever of our Universe. Analyses of such measurements are usually performed within the context of the so-called vanilla LCDM model - the six-parameter phenomenological model which, for instance, emerges from best fits against the recent data obtained by the Planck satellite. Here, we show that such an approach is prone to subtle systematics when the Gaussianity of primordial fluctuations is concerned. In particular, we demonstrate that, if we neglect even a tiny amount of primordial non-Gaussianity - fully consistent with current limits - we shall introduce spurious biases in the reconstruction of cosmological parameters. This is a serious issue that must be properly accounted for in view of accurate (as well as precise) cosmology.
  • We study the gravitational lensing effect on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies performing a ray-tracing of the primordial CMB photons through intervening large-scale structures (LSS) distribution predicted by N-Body numerical simulations with a particular focus on the precise recovery of the lens-induced polarized counterpart of the source plane. We apply both a multiple plane ray-tracing and an effective deflection approach based on the Born approximation to deflect the CMB photons trajectories through the simulated lightcone. We discuss the results obtained with both these methods together with the impact of LSS non-linear evolution on the CMB temperature and polarization power spectra. We compare our results with semi-analytical approximations implemented in Boltzmann codes like, e.g., CAMB. We show that, with our current N-body setup, the predicted lensing power is recovered with good accuracy in a wide range of multipoles while excess power with respect to semi-analytic prescriptions is observed in the lensing potential on scales $\ell \gtrsim 3000$. We quantify the impact of the numerical effects connected to the resolution in the N-Body simulation together with the resolution and band-limit chosen to synthesise the CMB source plane. We found these quantities to be particularly important for the simulation of B-mode polarization power spectrum.
  • Massive neutrinos are expected to influence the formation of the large-scale structure of the Universe, depending on the value of their total mass, $\Sigma m_\nu$. In particular Planck data indicate that a non-zero $\Sigma m_\nu$ may help to reconcile CMB data with Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster surveys. In order to study the impact of neutrinos on the SZ and X-ray cluster properties we run a set of six very large cosmological simulations (8$h^{-3}$ Gpc$^3$ comoving volume) that include a massive neutrino particle component: we consider the values of $\Sigma m_\nu$ = (0, 0.17, 0.34) eV in two cosmological scenarios to test possible degeneracies. Using the halo catalogues extracted from their outputs we produce 50 mock light-cones and, assuming suitable scaling relations, we determine how massive neutrinos affect SZ and X-ray cluster counts, the $y$-parameter and its power spectrum. We provide forecasts for the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and eROSITA cluster surveys, showing that the number of expected detections is reduced by 40 per cent when assuming $\Sigma m_\nu$ =0.34 eV with respect to a model with massless neutrinos. However the degeneracy with $\sigma_8$ and $\Omega_m$ is strong, in particular for X-ray data, requiring the use of additional probes to break it. The $y$-parameter properties are also highly influenced by the neutrino mass fraction, $f_\nu$, with $<\,y\,>\propto(1-f_\nu)^{20}$, considering the cluster component only, and the normalization of the SZ power spectrum is proportional to $(1-f_\nu)^{25-30}$. Comparing our findings with SPT and Atacama Cosmology Telescope measurements at $\ell$ = 3000 indicates that, when Planck cosmological parameters are assumed, a value of $\Sigma m_\nu\simeq0.34$ eV is required to fit with the data.
  • We reconstruct shear maps and angular power spectra from simulated weakly lensed total intensity (TT) and polarised (EB) maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, obtained using Born approximated ray-tracing through the N-body simulated Cold Dark Matter (CDM) structures in the Millennium Simulations (MS). We compare the recovered signal with the $\Lambda$CDM prediction, on the whole interval of angular scales which is allowed by the finite box size, extending from the degree scale to the arcminute, by applying a quadratic estimator in the flat sky limit; we consider PRISM-like instrumental specification for future generation CMB satellites, corresponding to arcminute angular resolution of 3.2' and sensitivity of 2.43 ${\mu}$K-arcmin. -arcmin. The noise bias in the simulations closely follows the estimator prediction, becoming dominated by limits in the angular resolution for the EB signal, at l${\simeq}$1500. The de-biased signal shows no visible departure from predictions of the weak lensing power within uncertainties, when considering TT and EB data singularly. In particular, the reconstruction precision reaches the level of a few percent in bins with $\Delta$l ${\simeq}$100 in the angular multiple interval 1000<l<2000 for TT, and about 10$%$ for EB. Within the adopted specifications, polarisation data do represent a significant contribution to the lensing shear, which appear to faithfully trace the underlying N-body structure down to the smallest angular scales achievable with the present setup, validating at the same time the latter with respect to semi-analytical predictions from ${\Lambda}$CDM cosmology at the level of CMB lensing statistics. This work demonstrates the feasibility of CMB lensing studies based on large scale simulations of cosmological structure formation in the context of the current and future high resolution and sensitivity CMB experiment.
  • We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate CMB weak-lensing via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS). The constructed maps reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the DE dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and CDM. We study the results from three models differing in the background and perturbations evolution, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables. The scenarios investigated include a reference LCDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a "bouncing" cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the LCDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through sigma_8, is the same in both the standard cDE and LCDM cosmologies. For the bouncing scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to a counter-intuitive effect, making the power of the lensing signal lower by 10% than in the LCDM scenario. Moreover, we compare the behaviour of CDM and baryons in CoDECS separately, in order to isolate effects coming from the coupling with the DE component. We find that, in the bouncing scenario, baryons show an opposite trend with respect to CDM, due to the coupling of the latter with the DE component. [abridged]
  • We discuss the ability of the planned Euclid mission to detect deviations from General Relativity using its extensive redshift survey of more than 50 Million galaxies. Constraints on the gravity theory are placed measuring the growth rate of structure within 14 redshift bins between z=0.7 and z=2. The growth rate is measured from redshift-space distortions, i.e. the anisotropy of the clustering pattern induced by coherent peculiar motions. This is performed in the overall context of the Euclid spectroscopic survey, which will simultaneously measure the expansion history of the universe, using the power spectrum and its baryonic features as a standard ruler, accounting for the relative degeneracies of expansion and growth parameters. The resulting expected errors on the growth rate in the different redshift bins, expressed through the quantity f\sigma_8, range between 1.3% and 4.4%. We discuss the optimisation of the survey configuration and investigate the important dependence on the growth parameterisation and the assumed cosmological model. We show how a specific parameterisation could actually drive the design towards artificially restricted regions of the parameter space. Finally, in the framework of the popular "\gamma -parameterisation", we show that the Euclid spectroscopic survey alone will already be able to provide substantial evidence (in Bayesian terms) if the growth index differs from the GR value \gamma=0.55 by at least \sim 0.13. This will combine with the comparable inference power provided by the Euclid weak lensing survey, resulting in Euclid's unique ability to provide a decisive test of modified gravity.
  • In the very last years, cosmological models where the properties of the dark components of the Universe - dark matter and dark energy - are accounted for by a single "dark fluid" have drawn increasing attention and interest. Amongst many proposals, Unified Dark Matter (UDM) cosmologies are promising candidates as effective theories. In these models, a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term in its Lagrangian mimics both the accelerated expansion of the Universe at late times and the clustering properties of the large-scale structure of the cosmos. However, UDM models also present peculiar behaviours, the most interesting one being the fact that the perturbations in the dark-matter component of the scalar field do have a non-negligible speed of sound. This gives rise to an effective Jeans scale for the Newtonian potential, below which the dark fluid does not cluster any more. This implies a growth of structures fairly different from that of the concordance LCDM model. In this paper, we demonstrate that forthcoming large-scale surveys will be able to discriminate between viable UDM models and LCDM to a good degree of accuracy. To this purpose, the planned Euclid satellite will be a powerful tool, since it will provide very accurate data on galaxy clustering and the weak lensing effect of cosmic shear. Finally, we also exploit the constraining power of the ongoing CMB Planck experiment. Although our approach is the most conservative, with the inclusion of only well-understood, linear dynamics, in the end we also show what could be done if some amount of non-linear information were included.
  • We present forecast errors on a wide range of cosmological parameters obtained from a photometric cluster catalogue of a future wide-field Euclid-like survey. We focus in particular on the total neutrino mass as constrained by a combination of the galaxy cluster number counts and correlation function. For the latter we consider only the shape information and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), while marginalising over the spectral amplitude and the redshift space distortions. In addition to the cosmological parameters of the standard LCDM+nu model we also consider a non-vanishing curvature, and two parameters describing a redshift evolution for the dark energy equation of state. For completeness, we also marginalise over a set of "nuisance" parameters, representing the uncertainties on the cluster mass determination. We find that combining cluster counts with power spectrum information greatly improves the constraining power of each probe taken individually, with errors on cosmological parameters being reduced by up to an order of magnitude. In particular, the best improvements are for the parameters defining the dynamical evolution of dark energy, where cluster counts break degeneracies. Moreover, the resulting error on neutrino mass is at the level of \sigma(M_\nu)\sim 0.9 eV, comparable with that derived from present Ly-alpha forest measurements and Cosmic Microwave background (CMB) data in the framework of a non-flat Universe. Further adopting Planck priors and reducing the number of free parameters to a LCDM+nu cosmology allows to place constraints on the total neutrino mass of \sigma(M_\nu) \sim 0.08 eV, close to the lower bound enforced by neutrino oscillation experiments. [abridged]
  • Cosmological neutrinos strongly affect the evolution of the largest structures in the Universe, i.e. galaxies and galaxy clusters. We use large box-size full hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the non-linear effects that massive neutrinos have on the spatial properties of cold dark matter (CDM) haloes. We quantify the difference with respect to the concordance LambdaCDM model of the halo mass function and of the halo two-point correlation function. We model the redshift-space distortions and compute the errors on the linear distortion parameter beta introduced if cosmological neutrinos are assumed to be massless. We find that, if not taken correctly into account and depending on the total neutrino mass, these effects could lead to a potentially fake signature of modified gravity. Future nearly all-sky spectroscopic galaxy surveys will be able to constrain the neutrino mass if it is larger than 0.6 eV, using beta measurements alone and independently of the value of the matter power spectrum normalisation. In combination with other cosmological probes, this will strengthen neutrino mass constraints and help breaking parameter degeneracies.
  • We consider cosmological parameters estimation in the presence of a non-zero isocurvature contribution in the primordial perturbations. A previous analysis showed that even a tiny amount of isocurvature perturbation, if not accounted for, could affect standard rulers calibration from Cosmic Microwave Background observations such as those provided by the Planck mission, affect Baryon Acoustic Oscillations interpretation and introduce biases in the recovered dark energy properties that are larger than forecasted statistical errors from future surveys. Extending on this work, here we adopt a general fiducial cosmology which includes a varying dark energy equation of state parameter and curvature. Beside Baryon Acoustic Oscillations measurements, we include the information from the shape of the galaxy power spectrum and consider a joint analysis of a Planck-like Cosmic Microwave Background probe and a future, space-based, Large Scale Structure probe not too dissimilar from recently proposed surveys. We find that this allows one to break the degeneracies that affect the Cosmic Microwave Background and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations combination. As a result, most of the cosmological parameter systematic biases arising from an incorrect assumption on the isocurvature fraction parameter $f_{iso}$, become negligible with respect to the statistical errors. We find that the Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure combination gives a statistical error $\sigma(f_{iso}) \sim 0.008$, even when curvature and a varying dark energy equation of state are included, which is smaller than the error obtained from Cosmic Microwave Background alone when flatness and cosmological constant are assumed. These results confirm the synergy and complementarity between Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure, and the great potential of future and planned galaxy surveys.
  • We examine whether future, nearly all-sky galaxy redshift surveys, in combination with CMB priors, will be able to detect the signature of the cosmic neutrino background and determine the absolute neutrino mass scale. We also consider what constraints can be imposed on the effective number of neutrino species. In particular we consider two spectroscopic strategies in the near-IR, the so-called "slitless" and "multi-slit" approaches, whose examples are given by future space-based galaxy surveys, as EUCLID for the slitless case, or SPACE, JEDI, and possibly WFIRST in the future, for the multi-slit case. We find that, in combination with Planck, these galaxy probes will be able to detect at better than 3--sigma level and measure the mass of cosmic neutrinos: a) in a cosmology-independent way, if the sum of neutrino masses is above 0.1 eV; b) assuming spatial flatness and that dark energy is a cosmological constant, otherwise. We find that the sensitivity of such surveys is well suited to span the entire range of neutrino masses allowed by neutrino oscillation experiments, and to yield a clear detection of non-zero neutrino mass. The detection of the cosmic relic neutrino background with cosmological experiments will be a spectacular confirmation of our model for the early Universe and a window into one of the oldest relic components of our Universe.
  • We investigate the constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity with varied bispectrum shapes that can be derived from the power spectrum of galaxies and clusters of galaxies detected in future wide field optical/near-infrared surveys. Having in mind the proposed ESA space mission \emph{Euclid} as a specific example, we combine the spatial distribution of spectroscopically selected galaxies with that of weak lensing selected clusters. We use the physically motivated halo model in order to represent the correlation function of arbitrary tracers of the Large Scale Structure in the Universe. As naively expected, we find that galaxies are much more effective in jointly constrain the level of primordial non-Gaussianity $f_\mathrm{NL}$ and the amplitude of the matter power spectrum $\sigma_8$ than clusters of galaxies, due to the much lower abundance of the latter that is not adequately compensated by the larger effect on the power spectrum. Nevertheless, combination of the galaxy power spectrum with the cluster-galaxy cross spectrum can decrease the error on the determination of $f_\mathrm{NL}$ by up to a factor of $\sim 2$. This decrement is particularly evident for the less studied non-Gaussian bispectrum shapes, the so-called enfolded and the orthogonal ones. Setting constraints on these models can shed new light on various aspects of the physics of the early Universe, and it is hence of extreme importance. By combining the power spectra of clusters and galaxies with the cluster-galaxy cross spectrum we find constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity of the order $\Delta f_\mathrm{NL} \sim $ a few, competitive and possibly superior to future CMB experiments.
  • We study the impact of the cosmological parameters uncertainties on the measurements of primordial non-Gaussianity through the large-scale non-Gaussian halo bias effect. While this is not expected to be an issue for the standard LCDM model, it may not be the case for more general models that modify the large-scale shape of the power spectrum. We consider the so-called local non-Gaussianity model and forecasts from planned surveys, alone and combined with a Planck CMB prior. In particular, we consider EUCLID- and LSST-like surveys and forecast the correlations among $f_{\rm NL}$ and the running of the spectral index $\alpha_s$, the dark energy equation of state $w$, the effective sound speed of dark energy perturbations $c^2_s$, the total mass of massive neutrinos $M_\nu=\sum m_\nu$, and the number of extra relativistic degrees of freedom $N_\nu^{rel}$. Neglecting CMB information on $f_{\rm NL}$ and scales $k > 0.03 h$/Mpc, we find that, if $N_\nu^{\rm rel}$ is assumed to be known, the uncertainty on cosmological parameters increases the error on $f_{\rm NL}$ by 10 to 30% depending on the survey. Thus the $f_{\rm NL}$ constraint is remarkable robust to cosmological model uncertainties. On the other hand, if $N_\nu^{\rm rel}$ is simultaneously constrained from the data, the $f_{\rm NL}$ error increases by $\sim 80%$. Finally, future surveys which provide a large sample of galaxies or galaxy clusters over a volume comparable to the Hubble volume can measure primordial non-Gaussianity of the local form with a marginalized 1--$\sigma$ error of the order $\Delta f_{\rm NL} \sim 2-5$, after combination with CMB priors for the remaining cosmological parameters. These results are competitive with CMB bispectrum constraints achievable with an ideal CMB experiment.
  • A space-based galaxy redshift survey would have enormous power in constraining dark energy and testing general relativity, provided that its parameters are suitably optimized. We study viable space-based galaxy redshift surveys, exploring the dependence of the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) figure-of-merit (FoM) on redshift accuracy, redshift range, survey area, target selection, and forecast method. Fitting formulae are provided for convenience. We also consider the dependence on the information used: the full galaxy power spectrum P(k, P(k) marginalized over its shape, or just the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). We find that the inclusion of growth rate information (extracted using redshift space distortion and galaxy clustering amplitude measurements) leads to a factor of ~ 3 improvement in the FoM, assuming general relativity is not modified. This inclusion partially compensates for the loss of information when only the BAO are used to give geometrical constraints, rather than using the full P(k) as a standard ruler. We find that a space-based galaxy redshift survey covering ~20,000 deg^2 over 0.5< z < 2 with \sigma_z/(1+z)<= 0.001 exploits a redshift range that is only easily accessible from space, extends to sufficiently low redshifts to allow both a vast 3-D map of the universe using a single tracer population, and overlaps with ground-based surveys to enable robust modeling of systematic effects. We argue that these parameters are close to their optimal values given current instrumental and practical constraints.
  • We have constructed the first all-sky CMB temperature and polarization lensed maps based on a high-resolution cosmological N-body simulation, the Millennium Simulation (MS). We have exploited the lensing potential map obtained using a map-making procedure (Carbone et al. 2008) which integrates along the line-of-sight the MS dark matter distribution by stacking and randomizing the simulation boxes up to $z = 127$, and which semi-analytically supplies the large-scale power in the angular lensing potential that is not correctly sampled by the N-body simulation. The lensed sky has been obtained by properly modifying the latest version of the LensPix code (Lewis 2005) to account for the MS structures. We have also produced all-sky lensed maps of the so-called $\psi_E$ and $\psi_B$ potentials, which are directly related to the electric and magnetic types of polarization. The angular power spectra of the simulated lensed temperature and polarization maps agree well with semi-analytic estimates up to $l < 2500$, while on smaller scales we find a slight excess of power which we interpret as being due to non-linear clustering in the MS. We also observe how non-linear lensing power in the polarised CMB is transferred to large angular scales by suitably misaligned modes in the CMB and the lensing potential. This work is relevant in view of the future CMB probes, as a way to analyse the lensed sky and disentangle the contribution from primordial gravitational waves.
  • James Aguirre, Alexandre Amblard, Amjad Ashoorioon, Carlo Baccigalupi, Amedeo Balbi, James Bartlett, Nicola Bartolo, Dominic Benford, Mark Birkinshaw, Jamie Bock, Dick Bond, Julian Borrill, Franois Bouchet, Michael Bridges, Emory Bunn, Erminia Calabrese, Christopher Cantalupo, Ana Caramete, Carmelita Carbone, Suchetana Chatterjee, Sarah Church, David Chuss, Carlo Contaldi, Asantha Cooray, Sudeep Das, Francesco De Bernardis, Paolo De Bernardis, Gianfranco De Zotti, Jacques Delabrouille, F.-Xavier Dsert, Mark Devlin, Clive Dickinson, Simon Dicker, Matt Dobbs, Scott Dodelson, Olivier Dore, Jessie Dotson, Joanna Dunkley, Maria Cristina Falvella, Dale Fixsen, Pablo Fosalba, Joseph Fowler, Evalyn Gates, Walter Gear, Sunil Golwala, Krzysztof Gorski, Alessandro Gruppuso, Josh Gundersen, Mark Halpern, Shaul Hanany, Masashi Hazumi, Carlos Hernandez-Monteagudo, Mark Hertzberg, Gary Hinshaw, Christopher Hirata, Eric Hivon, Warren Holmes, William Holzapfel, Wayne Hu, Johannes Hubmayr, Kevin Huffenberger, Kent Irwin, Mark Jackson, Andrew Jaffe, Bradley Johnson, William Jones, Manoj Kaplinghat, Brian Keating, Reijo Keskitalo, Justin Khoury, Will Kinney, Theodore Kisner, Lloyd Knox, Alan Kogut, Eiichiro Komatsu, Arthur Kosowsky, John Kovac, Lawrence Krauss, Hannu Kurki-Suonio, Susana Landau, Charles Lawrence, Samuel Leach, Adrian Lee, Erik Leitch, Rodrigo Leonardi, Julien Lesgourgues, Andrew Liddle, Eugene Lim, Michele Limon, Marilena Loverde, Philip Lubin, Antonio Magalhaes, Davide Maino, Tobias Marriage, Victoria Martin, Sabino Matarrese, John Mather, Harsh Mathur, Tomotake Matsumura, Pieter Meerburg, Alessandro Melchiorri, Stephan Meyer, Amber Miller, Michael Milligan, Kavilan Moodley, Michael Neimack, Hogan Nguyen, Ian O'Dwyer, Angiola Orlando, Luca Pagano, Lyman Page, Bruce Partridge, Timothy Pearson, Hiranya Peiris, Francesco Piacentini, Lucio Piccirillo, Elena Pierpaoli, Davide Pietrobon, Giampaolo Pisano, Levon Pogosian, Dmitri Pogosyan, Nicolas Ponthieu, Lucia Popa, Clement Pryke, Christoph Raeth, Subharthi Ray, Christian Reichardt, Sara Ricciardi, Paul Richards, Graca Rocha, Lawrence Rudnick, John Ruhl, Benjamin Rusholme, Claudia Scoccola, Douglas Scott, Carolyn Sealfon, Neelima Sehgal, Michael Seiffert, Leonardo Senatore, Paolo Serra, Sarah Shandera, Meir Shimon, Peter Shirron, Jonathan Sievers, Kris Sigurdson, Joe Silk, Robert Silverberg, Eva Silverstein, Suzanne Staggs, Albert Stebbins, Federico Stivoli, Radek Stompor, Naoshi Sugiyama, Daniel Swetz, Andria Tartari, Max Tegmark, Peter Timbie, Matthieu Tristram, Gregory Tucker, Jon Urrestilla, John Vaillancourt, Marcella Veneziani, Licia Verde, Joaquin Vieira, Scott Watson, Benjamin Wandelt, Grant Wilson, Edward Wollack, Mark Wyman, Amit Yadav, Giraud-Heraud Yannick, Olivier Zahn, Matias Zaldarriaga, Michael Zemcov, Jonathan Zwart
    March 5, 2009 astro-ph.CO
    How did the universe evolve? The fine angular scale (l>1000) temperature and polarization anisotropies in the CMB are a Rosetta stone for understanding the evolution of the universe. Through detailed measurements one may address everything from the physics of the birth of the universe to the history of star formation and the process by which galaxies formed. One may in addition track the evolution of the dark energy and discover the net neutrino mass. We are at the dawn of a new era in which hundreds of square degrees of sky can be mapped with arcminute resolution and sensitivities measured in microKelvin. Acquiring these data requires the use of special purpose telescopes such as the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), located in Chile, and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). These new telescopes are outfitted with a new generation of custom mm-wave kilo-pixel arrays. Additional instruments are in the planning stages.