• We build a background cluster candidate catalog from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey, using our detection algorithm RedGOLD. The NGVS covers 104$deg^2$ of the Virgo cluster in the $u^*,g,r,i,z$-bandpasses to a depth of $ g \sim 25.7$~mag (5$\sigma$). Part of the survey was not covered or has shallow observations in the $r$--band. We build two cluster catalogs: one using all bandpasses, for the fields with deep $r$--band observations ($\sim 20 \ deg^2$), and the other using four bandpasses ($u^*,g,i,z$) for the entire NGVS area. Based on our previous CFHT-LS W1 studies, we estimate that both of our catalogs are $\sim100\%$($\sim70\%$) complete and $\sim80\%$ pure, at $z\le 0.6$($z\lesssim1$), for galaxy clusters with masses of $M\gtrsim10^{14}\ M_{\odot}$. We show that when using four bandpasses, though the photometric redshift accuracy is lower, RedGOLD detects massive galaxy clusters up to $z\sim 1$ with completeness and purity similar to the five-band case. This is achieved when taking into account the bias in the richness estimation, which is $\sim40\%$ lower at $0.5\le z<0.6$ and $\sim20\%$ higher at $0.6<z< 0.8$, with respect to the five-band case. RedGOLD recovers all the X-ray clusters in the area with mass $M_{500} > 1.4 \times 10^{14} \rm M_{\odot}$ and $0.08<z<0.5$. Because of our different cluster richness limits and the NGVS depth, our catalogs reach to lower masses than the published redMaPPer cluster catalog over the area, and we recover $\sim 90-100\%$ of its detections.
  • We measured stacked weak lensing cluster masses for a sample of 1325 galaxy clusters detected by the RedGOLD algorithm in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey W1 and the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey at $0.2<z<0.5$, in the optical richness range $10<\lambda<70$. After a selection of our best richness subsample ($20<\lambda<50$), this is the most comprehensive lensing study of a $\sim 100\%$ complete and $\sim 90\%$ pure optical cluster catalogue in this redshift range, with a total of 346 clusters in $\sim164~deg^2$. We test three different mass models, and our best model includes a basic halo model, with a Navarro Frenk and White profile, and correction terms that take into account cluster miscentering, non-weak shear, the two-halo term, the contribution of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy, and an a posteriori correction for the intrinsic scatter in the mass-richness relation. With this model, we obtain a mass-richness relation of $\log{M_{\rm 200}/M_{\odot}}=(14.48\pm0.04)+(1.14\pm0.23)\log{(\lambda/40)}$ (statistical uncertainties). This result is consistent with other published lensing mass-richness relations. When compared to X-ray masses and mass proxies, we find that on average weak lensing masses are $\sim 10\%$ higher than those derived in the X-ray in the range $2\times10^{13}M_{\rm \odot}<E(z) M^{X}_{\rm 200}<2\times10^{14}M_{\rm \odot}$, in agreement with most previous results and simulations. We also give the coefficients of the scaling relations between the lensing mass and X-ray mass proxies, $L_X$ and $T_X$, and compare them with previous results.