• Millimeter-wave continuum astronomy is today an indispensable tool for both general Astrophysics studies and Cosmology. General purpose, large field-of-view instruments are needed to map the sky at intermediate angular scales not accessible by the high-resolution interferometers and by the coarse angular resolution space-borne or ground-based surveys. These instruments have to be installed at the focal plane of the largest single-dish telescopes. In this context, we have constructed and deployed a multi-thousands pixels dual-band (150 and 260 GHz, respectively 2mm and 1.15mm wavelengths) camera to image an instantaneous field-of-view of 6.5arc-min and configurable to map the linear polarization at 260GHz. We are providing a detailed description of this instrument, named NIKA2 (New IRAM KID Arrays 2), in particular focusing on the cryogenics, the optics, the focal plane arrays based on Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) and the readout electronics. We are presenting the performance measured on the sky during the commissioning runs that took place between October 2015 and April 2017 at the 30-meter IRAM (Institut of Millimetric Radio Astronomy) telescope at Pico Veleta. NIKA2 has been successfully deployed and commissioned, performing in-line with the ambitious expectations. In particular, NIKA2 exhibits FWHM angular resolutions of around 11 and 17.5 arc-seconds at respectively 260 and 150GHz. The NEFD (Noise Equivalent Flux Densities) demonstrated on the maps are, at these two respective frequencies, 33 and 8 mJy*sqrt(s). A first successful science verification run has been achieved in April 2017. The instrument is currently offered to the astronomical community during the coming winter and will remain available for at least the next ten years.
  • We introduce xCOLD GASS, a legacy survey providing a census of molecular gas in the local Universe. Building upon the original COLD GASS survey, we present here the full sample of 532 galaxies with CO(1-0) measurements from the IRAM-30m telescope. The sample is mass-selected in the redshift interval $0.01<z<0.05$ from SDSS, and therefore representative of the local galaxy population with M$_{\ast}>10^9$M$_{\odot}$. The CO(1-0) flux measurements are complemented by observations of the CO(2-1) line with both the IRAM-30m and APEX telescopes, HI observations from Arecibo, and photometry from SDSS, WISE and GALEX. Combining the IRAM and APEX data, we find that the CO(2-1) to CO(1-0) luminosity ratio for integrated measurements is $r_{21}=0.79\pm0.03$, with no systematic variations across the sample. The CO(1-0) luminosity function is constructed and best fit with a Schechter function with parameters {$L_{\mathrm{CO}}^* = (7.77\pm2.11) \times 10^9\,\mathrm{K\,km\,s^{-1}\, pc^{2}}$, $\phi^{*} = (9.84\pm5.41) \times 10^{-4} \, \mathrm{Mpc^{-3}}$ and $\alpha = -1.19\pm0.05$}. With the sample now complete down to stellar masses of $10^9$M$_{\odot}$, we are able to extend our study of gas scaling relations and confirm that both molecular gas fraction and depletion timescale vary with specific star formation rate (or offset from the star-formation main sequence) much more strongly than they depend on stellar mass. Comparing the xCOLD GASS results with outputs from hydrodynamic and semi-analytic models, we highlight the constraining power of cold gas scaling relations on models of galaxy formation.
  • We describe the POLAMI program for the monitoring of all four Stokes parameters of a sample of bright radio-loud active galactic nuclei with the IRAM 30m telescope at 3.5 and 1.3mm. The program started in October 2006 and accumulated, until August 2014, 2300 observations at 3.5mm, achieving a median time sampling interval of 22 days for the sample of 37 sources. This first paper explains the source selection, mostly blazars, the observing strategy and data calibration, and gives the details of the instrumental polarisation corrections. The sensitivity (1sigma) reached at 3.5mm is 0.5% (linear polarisation degree), 4.7 deg. (polarisation angle), and 0.23% (circular polarisation), while the corresponding values at 1.3mm are 1.7%, 9.9 deg., and 0.72%, respectively. The data quality is demonstrated by the time sequences of our calibrators Mars and Uranus. For the quasar 3C286, widely used as a linear polarisation calibrator, we give improved estimates of its linear polarisation, and show for the first time occasional detections of its weak circular polarisation, which suggests a small level of variability of the source at millimeter wavelengths.
  • We compare the structure of molecular gas at $40$ pc resolution to the ability of gas to form stars across the disk of the spiral galaxy M51. We break the PAWS survey into $370$ pc and $1.1$ kpc resolution elements, and within each we estimate the molecular gas depletion time ($\tau_{\rm Dep}^{\rm mol}$), the star formation efficiency per free fall time ($\epsilon_{\rm ff}$), and the mass-weighted cloud-scale (40 pc) properties of the molecular gas: surface density, $\Sigma$, line width, $\sigma$, and $b\equiv\Sigma/\sigma^2\propto\alpha_{\rm vir}^{-1}$, a parameter that traces the boundedness of the gas. We show that the cloud-scale surface density appears to be a reasonable proxy for mean volume density. Applying this, we find a typical star formation efficiency per free-fall time, $\epsilon_{ff} \left( \left< \Sigma_{40pc} \right> \right) \sim 0.3{-}0.36\%$, lower than adopted in many models and found for local clouds. More, the efficiency per free fall time anti-correlates with both $\Sigma$ and $\sigma$, in some tension with turbulent star formation models. The best predictor of the rate of star formation per unit gas mass in our analysis is $b \equiv \Sigma / \sigma^2$, tracing the strength of self gravity, with $\tau_{\rm Dep}^{\rm mol} \propto b^{-0.9}$. The sense of the correlation is that gas with stronger self-gravity (higher $b$) forms stars at a higher rate (low $\tau_{\rm Dep}^{\rm mol}$). The different regions of the galaxy mostly overlap in $\tau_{\rm Dep}^{\rm mol}$ as a function of $b$, so that low $b$ explains the surprisingly high $\tau_{\rm Dep}^{\rm mol}$ found towards the inner spiral arms found by by Meidt et al. (2013).
  • The cloud-scale density, velocity dispersion, and gravitational boundedness of the interstellar medium (ISM) vary within and among galaxies. In turbulent models, these properties play key roles in the ability of gas to form stars. New high fidelity, high resolution surveys offer the prospect to measure these quantities across galaxies. We present a simple approach to make such measurements and to test hypotheses that link small-scale gas structure to star formation and galactic environment. Our calculations capture the key physics of the Larson scaling relations, and we show good correspondence between our approach and a traditional "cloud properties" treatment. However, we argue that our method is preferable in many cases because of its simple, reproducible characterization of all emission. Using, low-J 12CO data from recent surveys, we characterize the molecular ISM at 60pc resolution in the Antennae, the Large Magellanic Cloud, M31, M33, M51, and M74. We report the distributions of surface density, velocity dispersion, and gravitational boundedness at 60pc scales and show galaxy-to-galaxy and intra-galaxy variations in each. The distribution of flux as a function of surface density appears roughly lognormal with a 1sigma width of ~0.3 dex, though the center of this distribution varies from galaxy to galaxy. The 60pc resolution line width and molecular gas surface density correlate well, which is a fundamental behavior expected for virialized or free-falling gas. Varying the measurement scale for the LMC and M31, we show that the molecular ISM has higher surface densities, lower line widths, and more self-gravity at smaller scales.
  • We present a new survey of HCN(1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, focused on the little-explored regime of normal star-forming galaxy disks. Combining HCN, CO, and infrared (IR) emission, we investigate the role of dense gas in Star Formation (SF), finding systematic variations in both the apparent dense gas fraction and the apparent SF efficiency (SFE) of dense gas. The latter may be unexpected, given the popularity of gas density threshold models to explain SF scaling relations. We used the IRAM 30-m telescope to observe HCN(1-0) across 29 nearby disk galaxies whose CO(2-1) emission has previously been mapped by the HERACLES survey. Because our observations span a range of galactocentric radii, we are able to investigate the properties of the dense gas as a function of local conditions. We focus on how the IR/CO, HCN/CO, and IR/HCN ratios (observational cognates of the SFE, dense gas fraction, and dense gas SFE) depend on the stellar surface density and the molecular/atomic ratio. The HCN/CO ratio correlates tightly with these two parameters across a range of 2.1 dex and increases in the high surface density parts of galaxies. Simultaneously, the IR/HCN ratio decreases systematically with these same parameters and is ~6-8 times lower near galaxy centers than in the outer regions. For fixed line-mass conversion factors, these results are incompatible with a simple model in which SF depends only on the gas mass above some density threshold. Only a specific set of environment-dependent conversion factors can render our observations compatible with such a model. Whole cloud models, such as the theory of turbulence regulated SF, do a better job of matching our data. We explore one such model in which variations in the Mach number and in the mean density would respectively drive the trends within galaxy disks and the differences between disk and merging galaxies (abridged).
  • We describe and execute a novel approach to observationally estimate the lifetimes of giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We focus on the cloud population between the two main spiral arms in M51 (the inter-arm region) where cloud destruction via shear and star formation feedback dominates over formation processes. By monitoring the change in GMC number densities and properties from one side of the inter-arm to the other, we estimate the lifetime as a fraction of the inter-arm travel time. We find that GMC lifetimes in M51's inter-arm are finite and short, 20 to 30 Myr. Such short lifetimes suggest that cloud evolution is influenced by environment, in which processes can disrupt GMCs after a few free-fall times. Over most of the region under investigation shear appears to regulate the lifetime. As the shear timescale increases with galactocentric radius, we expect cloud destruction to switch primarily to star formation feedback at larger radii. We identify a transition from shear- to feedback-dominated disruption through a change in the behavior of the GMC number density. The signature suggests that shear is more efficient at completely dispersing clouds, whereas feedback transforms the population, e.g. by fragmenting high mass clouds into lower mass pieces. Compared to the characteristic timescale for molecular hydrogen in M51, our short lifetimes suggest that gas can remain molecular while clouds disperse and reassemble. We propose that galaxy dynamics regulates the cycling of molecular material from diffuse to bound (and ultimately star-forming) objects, contributing to long observed molecular depletion times in normal disk galaxies. We also speculate that, in more extreme environments such as elliptical galaxies and concentrated galaxy centers, star formation can be suppressed when the shear timescale becomes so short that some clouds can not survive to collapse and form stars.
  • We used the IRAM 30m telescope to observe the frequency range [86-116]GHz towards the central regions of the starburst galaxies M83, M82, and NGC253, the AGNs M51, NGC1068, and NGC7469, and the ULIRGs Arp220 and Mrk231. Assuming LTE conditions, we calculated the column densities of 27 molecules and 10 isotopologues. Among others, we report the first tentative detections of CH3CHO, HNCO, and NS in M82 and, for the first time in the extragalactic medium, HC5N in NGC253. Halpha recombination lines were only found in M82 and NGC253. Vibrationally excited lines of HC3N were only detected in Arp220. CH3CCH emission is only seen in the starburst-dominated galaxies. By comparison of the fractional abundances among the galaxies, we looked for the molecules that are best suited to characterise the chemistry of starbursts, AGNs and ULIRGs, as well as the differences among galaxies within the same group.
  • The kinematic complexity and the favorable position of M51 on the sky make this galaxy an ideal target to test different theories of spiral arm dynamics. Taking advantage of the new high resolution PdBI Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS) data, we undertake a detailed kinematic study of M51 to characterize and quantify the origin and nature of the non-circular motions. Using a tilted-ring analysis supported by several other archival datasets we update the estimation of M51's position angle (PA=(173 +/- 3) deg) and inclination (i=(22 +/- 5) deg). Harmonic decomposition of the high resolution (40 pc) CO velocity field shows the first kinematic evidence of an m=3 wave in the inner disk of M51 with a corotation at R(CR,m=3)=1.1 +/- 0.1 kpc and a pattern speed of Omega_p(m=3) = 140 km/(s kpc). This mode seems to be excited by the nuclear bar, while the beat frequencies generated by the coupling between the m=3 mode and the main spiral structure confirm its density-wave nature. We observe also a signature of an m=1 mode that is likely responsible for the lopsidedness of M51 at small and large radii. We provide a simple method to estimate the radial variation of the amplitude of the spiral perturbation (Vsp) attributed to the different modes. The main spiral arm structure has <Vsp>=50-70 km/s, while the streaming velocity associated with the m=1 and m=3 modes is, in general, 2 times lower. Our joint analysis of HI and CO velocity fields at low and high spatial resolution reveals that the atomic and molecular gas phases respond differently to the spiral perturbation due to their different vertical distribution and emission morphology.
  • Using data from the PdBI Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS), we have generated the largest extragalactic Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) catalog to date, containing 1,507 individual objects. GMCs in the inner M51 disk account for only 54% of the total 12CO(1-0) luminosity of the survey, but on average they exhibit physical properties similar to Galactic GMCs. We do not find a strong correlation between the GMC size and velocity dispersion, and a simple virial analysis suggests that 30% of GMCs in M51 are unbound. We have analyzed the GMC properties within seven dynamically-motivated galactic environments, finding that GMCs in the spiral arms and in the central region are brighter and have higher velocity dispersions than inter-arm clouds. Globally, the GMC mass distribution does not follow a simple power law shape. Instead, we find that the shape of the mass distribution varies with galactic environment: the distribution is steeper in inter-arm region than in the spiral arms, and exhibits a sharp truncation at high masses for the nuclear bar region. We propose that the observed environmental variations in the GMC properties and mass distributions are a consequence of the combined action of large-scale dynamical processes and feedback from high mass star formation. We describe some challenges of using existing GMC identification techniques for decomposing the 12CO(1-0) emission in molecule-rich environments, such as M51's inner disk.
  • We compare the properties of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in M51 identified by the Plateau de Bure Interferometer Whirlpool Arcsecond Survey (PAWS) with GMCs identified in wide-field, high resolution surveys of CO emission in M33 and the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We find that GMCs in M51 are larger, brighter and have higher velocity dispersions relative to their size than equivalent structures in M33 and the LMC. These differences imply that there are genuine variations in the average mass surface density of the different GMC populations. To explain this, we propose that the pressure in the interstellar medium surrounding the GMCs plays a role in regulating their density and velocity dispersion. We find no evidence for a correlation between size and linewidth in any of M51, M33 or the LMC when the CO emission is decomposed into GMCs, although moderately robust correlations are apparent when regions of contiguous CO emission (with no size limitation) are used. Our work demonstrates that observational bias remains an important obstacle to the identification and study of extragalactic GMC populations using CO emission, especially in molecule-rich galactic environments.
  • We present the results of CO emission line observations toward the semicircular Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) 3C434.1 (G94.0+1.0). We mapped an area covering the whole SNR in the 12CO J=1-0 emission line using the Seoul Radio Astronomy Observatory (SRAO) 6-m telescope, and found a large molecular cloud superposed on the faint western part of the SNR. The cloud was elongated along the north-south direction and showed a very good spatial correlation with the radio features of the SNR. We carried out 12CO J=2-1 line observations of this cloud using the K\"{o}lner Observatorium f\"{u}r Sub-Millimeter Astronomie (KOSMA) 3-m telescope and found a region in which the 12CO J=2-1 to J=1-0 ratio was high (~ 1.6). This higher excitation, together with the morphological relation, strongly suggested that the molecular cloud was interacting with the SNR. The systemic velocity of the molecular cloud (-13 km/s) gave a kinematic distance of 3.0 kpc to the SNR-molecular cloud system. We derived the physical parameters of the SNR based on this new distance. We examined the variation of the radio spectral index over the remnant and found that it was flatter in the western part, wherein the SNR was interacting with the molecular cloud. We therefore propose that 3C434.1 is the remnant of a supernova explosion that occurred just outside the boundary of a relatively thin, sheetlike molecular cloud. We present a hydrodynamic model showing that its asymmetric radio morphology can result from its interaction with this blocking molecular cloud.
  • We use the high spatial and spectral resolution of the PAWS CO(1-0) survey of the inner 9 kpc of the iconic spiral galaxy M51 to examine the effect of gas streaming motions on the star-forming properties of individual GMCs. We compare our view of gas flows in M51 -- which arise due to departures from axi-symmetry in the gravitational potential (i.e. the nuclear bar and spiral arms) -- with the global pattern of star formation as traced by Halpha and 24\mu m emission. We find that the dynamical environment of GMCs strongly affects their ability to form stars, in the sense that GMCs situated in regions with large streaming motions can be stabilized, while similarly massive GMCs in regions without streaming go on to efficiently form stars. We argue that this is the result of reduced surface pressure felt by clouds embedded in an ambient medium undergoing large streaming motions, which prevents collapse. Indeed, the variation in gas depletion time expected based on the observed streaming motions throughout the disk of M51 quantitatively agrees with the variation in observed gas depletion time scale. The example of M51 shows that streaming motions, triggered by gravitational instabilities in the form of bars and spiral arms, can alter the star formation law; this can explain the variation in gas depletion time among galaxies with different masses and morphologies. In particular, we can explain the long gas depletion times in spiral galaxies compared to dwarf galaxies and starbursts. We suggest that adding a dynamical pressure term to the canonical free-fall time produces a single star formation law that can be applied to all star-forming regions and galaxies, across cosmic time.
  • We analyse the distribution of CO brightness temperature and integrated intensity in M51 at ~40 pc resolution using new CO data from the Plateau de Bure Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS). We present probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the CO emission within the PAWS field, which covers the inner 11 x 7 kpc of M51. We find variations in the shape of CO PDFs within different M51 environments, and between M51 and M33 and the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Globally, the PDFs for the inner disk of M51 can be represented by narrow lognormal functions that cover 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in CO brightness and integrated intensity. The PDFs for M33 and the LMC are narrower and peak at lower CO intensities. However, the CO PDFs for different dynamical environments within the PAWS field depart from the shape of the global distribution. The PDFs for the interarm region are approximately lognormal, but in the spiral arms and central region of M51, they exhibit diverse shapes with a significant excess of bright CO emission. The observed environmental dependence of the shape of the CO PDFs is qualitatively consistent with changes that would be expected if molecular gas in the spiral arms has a larger range of average densities, gas temperatures and velocity fluctuations, though further work is required to disentangle the importance of large-scale dynamical effects versus star formation feedback in regulating these properties. We show that the shape of the CO PDFs for different M51 environments is only weakly related to global properties of the CO emission, but is strongly correlated with some properties of the local giant molecular cloud (GMC) and young stellar cluster populations. For galaxies with strong spiral structure such as M51, our results indicate that galactic-scale dynamical processes play a significant role in the formation and evolution of GMCs and stellar clusters.(abridged)
  • We aimed to study the molecular composition of the interstellar medium (ISM) surrounding an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), by making an inventory of molecular species and their abundances, as well as to establish a chemical differentiation between starburst galaxies and AGN. We used the IRAM-30 m telescope to observe the central 1.5-2 kpc region of NGC1068, covering the frequencies between 86.2 GHz and 115.6 GHz. Using Boltzmann diagrams, we calculated the column densities of the detected molecules. We used a chemical model to reproduce the abundances found in the AGN, to determine the origin of each detected species, and to test the influence of UV fields, cosmic rays, and shocks on the ISM. We identified 24 different molecular species and isotopologues, among which HC3N, SO, N2H+, CH3CN, NS, 13CN, and HN13C are detected for the first time in NGC1068. We obtained the upper limits to the isotopic ratios 12C/13C=49, 16O/18O=177 and 32S/34S=5. Our chemical models suggest that the chemistry in the nucleus of NGC1068 is strongly influenced by cosmic rays, although high values of both cosmic rays and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation fields also explain well the observations. The gas in the nucleus of NGC1068 has a different chemical composition as compared to starburst galaxies. The distinct physical processes dominating galaxy nuclei (e.g. C-shocks, UV fields, X-rays, cosmic rays) leave clear imprints in the chemistry of the gas, which allow to characterise the nucleus activity by its molecular abundances.
  • [Abridged] We present maps of CO 2-1 emission covering the entire star-forming disks of 16 nearby dwarf galaxies observed by the IRAM HERACLES survey. The data have 13 arcsec angular resolution, ~250 pc at our average distance of 4 Mpc, and sample the galaxies by 10-1000 resolution elements. We apply stacking techniques to perform the first sensitive search for CO emission in dwarfs outside the Local Group ranging from single lines-of-sight, stacked over IR-bright regions of embedded star formation, and stacked over the entire galaxy. We detect 5 dwarfs in CO with total luminosities of L_CO = 3-28 1e6 Kkmspc2. The other 11 dwarfs remain undetected in CO even in the stacked data and have L_CO < 0.4-8 1e6 Kkmspc2. We combine our sample of dwarfs with a large literature sample of spirals to study scaling relations of L_CO with M_B and metallicity. We find that dwarfs with metallicities of Z ~ 1/2-1/10 Z_sun have L_CO about 1e2-1e4x smaller than spirals and that their L_CO per unit L_B is 10-100x smaller. A comparison with tracers of star formation (FUV and 24 micron) shows that L_CO per unit SFR is 10-100x smaller in dwarfs. One possible interpretation is that dwarfs form stars much more efficiently, however we argue that the low L_CO/SFR ratio is due to significant changes of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, alpha_CO, in low metallicity environments. Assuming a constant H2 depletion time of 1.8 Gyr (as found for nearby spirals) implies alpha_CO values for dwarfs with Z ~ 1/2-1/10 Z_sun that are more than 10x higher than those found in solar metallicity spirals. This significant increase of alpha_CO at low metallicity is consistent with previous studies, in particular those which model dust emission to constrain H2 masses. Even though it is difficult to parameterize the metallicity dependence of alpha_CO, our results suggest that CO is increasingly difficult to detect at lower metallicities.
  • We compare the semi-analytic models of galaxy formation of Fu et al. (2010), which track the evolution of the radial profiles of atomic and molecular gas in galaxies, with gas fraction scaling relations derived from the COLD GASS survey (Saintonge et al 2011). The models provide a good description of how condensed baryons in galaxies with gas are partitioned into stars, atomic and molecular gas as a function of galaxy stellar mass and surface density. The models do not reproduce the tight observed relation between stellar surface density and bulge-to-disk ratio for this population. We then turn to an analysis of the"quenched" population of galaxies without detectable cold gas. The current implementation of radio-mode feedback in the models disagrees strongly with the data. In the models, gas cooling shuts down in nearly all galaxies in dark matter halos above a mass of 10**12 M_sun. As a result, stellar mass is the observable that best predicts whether a galaxy has little or no neutral gas. In contrast, our data show that quenching is largely independent of stellar mass. Instead, there are clear thresholds in bulge-to-disk ratio and in stellar surface density that demarcate the location of quenched galaxies. We propose that processes associated with bulge formation play a key role in depleting the neutral gas in galaxies and that further gas accretion is suppressed following the formation of the bulge, even in dark matter halos of low mass.
  • We use the IRAM HERACLES survey to study CO emission from 33 nearby spiral galaxies down to very low intensities. Using atomic hydrogen (HI) data, mostly from THINGS, we predict the local mean CO velocity from the mean HI velocity. By renormalizing the CO velocity axis so that zero corresponds to the local mean HI velocity we are able to stack spectra coherently over large regions as function of radius. This enables us to measure CO intensities with high significance as low as Ico = 0.3 K km/s (H2_SD = 1 Msun/pc2), an improvement of about one order of magnitude over previous studies. We detect CO out to radii Rgal = R25 and find the CO radial profile to follow a uniform exponential decline with scale length of 0.2 R25. Comparing our sensitive CO profiles to matched profiles of HI, Halpha, FUV, and IR emission at 24um and 70um, we observe a tight, roughly linear relation between CO and IR intensity that does not show any notable break between regions that are dominated by molecular (H2) gas (H2_SD > HI_SD) and those dominated by atomic gas (H2_SD < HI_SD). We use combinations of FUV+24um and Halpha+24um to estimate the recent star formation rate (SFR) surface density, SFR_SD, and find approximately linear relations between SFR_SD and H2_SD. We interpret this as evidence for stars forming in molecular gas with little dependence on the local total gas surface density. While galaxies display small internal variations in the SFR-to-H2 ratio, we do observe systematic galaxy-to-galaxy variations. These galaxy-to-galaxy variations dominate the scatter in relations between CO and SFR tracers measured at large scales. The variations have the sense that less massive galaxies exhibit larger ratios of SFR-to-CO than massive galaxies. Unlike the SFR-to-CO ratio, the balance between HI and H2 depends strongly on the total gas surface density and radius. It must also depend on additional parameters.
  • We study the relation between molecular gas and star formation in a volume-limited sample of 222 galaxies from the COLD GASS survey, with measurements of the CO(1-0) line from the IRAM 30m telescope. The galaxies are at redshifts 0.025<z<0.05 and have stellar masses in the range 10.0<log(M*/Msun)<11.5. The IRAM measurements are complemented by deep Arecibo HI observations and homogeneous SDSS and GALEX photometry. A reference sample that includes both UV and far-IR data is used to calibrate our estimates of star formation rates from the seven optical/UV bands. The mean molecular gas depletion timescale, tdep(H2), for all the galaxies in our sample is 1 Gyr, however tdep(H2) increases by a factor of 6 from a value of ~0.5 Gyr for galaxies with stellar masses of 10^10 Msun to ~3 Gyr for galaxies with masses of a few times 10^11 Msun. In contrast, the atomic gas depletion timescale remains contant at a value of around 3 Gyr. This implies that in high mass galaxies, molecular and atomic gas depletion timescales are comparable, but in low mass galaxies, molecular gas is being consumed much more quickly than atomic gas. The strongest dependences of tdep(H2) are on the stellar mass of the galaxy (parameterized as log tdep(H2)= (0.36+/-0.07)(log M* - 10.70)+(9.03+/-0.99)), and on the specific star formation rate. A single tdep(H2) versus sSFR relation is able to fit both "normal" star-forming galaxies in our COLD GASS sample, as well as more extreme starburst galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs), which have tdep(H2) < 10^8 yr. Normal galaxies at z=1-2 are displaced with respect to the local galaxy population in the tdep(H2) versus sSFR plane and have molecular gas depletion times that are a factor of 3-5 times longer at a given value of sSFR due to their significantly larger gas fractions.
  • We are conducting COLD GASS, a legacy survey for molecular gas in nearby galaxies. Using the IRAM 30m telescope, we measure the CO(1-0) line in a sample of ~350 nearby (D=100-200 Mpc), massive galaxies (log(M*/Msun)>10.0). The sample is selected purely according to stellar mass, and therefore provides an unbiased view of molecular gas in these systems. By combining the IRAM data with SDSS photometry and spectroscopy, GALEX imaging and high-quality Arecibo HI data, we investigate the partition of condensed baryons between stars, atomic gas and molecular gas in 0.1-10L* galaxies. In this paper, we present CO luminosities and molecular hydrogen masses for the first 222 galaxies. The overall CO detection rate is 54%, but our survey also uncovers the existence of sharp thresholds in galaxy structural parameters such as stellar mass surface density and concentration index, below which all galaxies have a measurable cold gas component but above which the detection rate of the CO line drops suddenly. The mean molecular gas fraction MH2/M* of the CO detections is 0.066+/-0.039, and this fraction does not depend on stellar mass, but is a strong function of NUV-r colour. Through stacking, we set a firm upper limit of MH2/M*=0.0016+/-0.0005 for red galaxies with NUV-r>5.0. The average molecular-to-atomic hydrogen ratio in present-day galaxies is 0.3, with significant scatter from one galaxy to the next. The existence of strong detection thresholds in both the HI and CO lines suggests that "quenching" processes have occurred in these systems. Intriguingly, atomic gas strongly dominates in the minority of galaxies with significant cold gas that lie above these thresholds. This suggests that some re-accretion of gas may still be possible following the quenching event.
  • We report new observations of the galaxy UGC8802 obtained through GASS, the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey, which show this galaxy to be in a remarkable evolutionary state. UGC8802 (GASS35981) is a disk galaxy with stellar mass M*=2x10^10 Msolar which appears to contain an additional 2.1x10^10 Msolar of HI gas. New millimeter observations with the IRAM 30m telescope indicate a molecular gas mass only a tenth this large. Using deep long-slit spectroscopy, we examine the spatially resolved star formation rate and metallicity profiles of GASS35981 for clues to its history. We find that the star formation surface density in this galaxy is low (Sigma_SFR=0.003 Msolar/yr/kpc^2) and that the star formation is spread remarkably evenly across the galaxy. The low molecular gas masses measured in our three IRAM pointings are largely consistent with the total star formation measured within the same apertures. Our MMT long-slit spectrum reveals a sharp drop in metallicity in the outer disk of GASS35981. The ratio of current star formation rate to existing stellar mass surface density in the outer disk is extremely high, implying that all the stars must have formed within the past ~1Gyr. At current star formation rates, however, GASS35981 will not consume its HI reservoir for another 5-7 Gyr. Despite its exceptionally large gas fraction for a galaxy this massive, GASS35981 has a regular rotation curve and exhibits no sign of a recent interaction or merger. We speculate that GASS35981 may have acquired its gas directly from the inter-galactic medium, and that it and other similar galaxies identified in the GASS survey may provide rare local glimpses of gas accretion processes that were more common during the prime epoch of disk galaxy formation at z~1.
  • Does star formation proceed in the same way in large spirals such as the Milky Way and in smaller chemically younger galaxies? Earlier work suggests a more rapid transformation of H$_2$ into stars in these objects but (1) a doubt remains about the validity of the H$_2$ mass estimates and (2) there is currently no explanation for why star formation should be more efficient. M~33, a local group spiral with a mass $\sim 10$\% and a metallicity half that of the Galaxy, represents a first step towards the metal poor Dwarf Galaxies. We have searched for molecular clouds in the outer disk of M~33 and present here a set of detections of both $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO, including the only detections (for both lines) beyond the R$_{25}$ radius in a subsolar metallicity galaxy. The spatial resolution enables mass estimates for the clouds and thus a measure of the $N({\rm H}_2) / I_{\rm CO}$ ratio, which in turn enables a more reliable calculation of the H$_2$ mass. Our estimate for the outer disk of M~33 is $N({\rm H}_2) / I_{\rm CO(1-0)} \sim 5 \times 10^{20} \,{\rm cm^{-2}/(K{\rm \ km \ s^{-1}})}$ with an estimated uncertainty of a factor $\le 2$. While the $^{12/13}$CO line ratios do not provide a reliable measure of $N({\rm H}_2) / I_{\rm CO}$, the values we find are slightly greater than Galactic and corroborate a somewhat higher $N({\rm H}_2) / I_{\rm CO}$ value. Comparing the CO observations with other tracers of the interstellar medium, no reliable means of predicting where CO would be detected was identified. In particular, CO detections were often not directly on local HI or FIR or H$\alpha$ peaks, although generally in regions with FIR emission and high HI column density. The results presented here provide support for the quicker transformation of H$_2$ into stars in M~33 than in large local universe spirals.