• This short article presents a summary of the NetSciEd (Network Science and Education) initiative that aims to address the need for curricula, resources, accessible materials, and tools for introducing K-12 students and the general public to the concept of networks, a crucial framework in understanding complexity. NetSciEd activities include (1) the NetSci High educational outreach program (since 2010), which connects high school students and their teachers with regional university research labs and provides them with the opportunity to work on network science research projects; (2) the NetSciEd symposium series (since 2012), which brings network science researchers and educators together to discuss how network science can help and be integrated into formal and informal education; and (3) the Network Literacy: Essential Concepts and Core Ideas booklet (since 2014), which was created collaboratively and subsequently translated into 18 languages by an extensive group of network science researchers and educators worldwide.
  • Networks have become increasingly relevant to everyday life as human society has become increasingly connected. Attaining a basic understanding of networks has thus become a necessary form of literacy for people (and for youths in particular). At the NetSci 2014 conference, we initiated a year-long process to develop an educational resource that concisely summarizes essential concepts about networks that can be used by anyone of school age or older. The process involved several brainstorming sessions on one key question: "What should every person living in the 21st century know about networks by the time he/she finishes secondary education?" Different sessions reached diverse participants, which included professional researchers in network science, educators, and high-school students. The generated ideas were connected by the students to construct a concept network. We examined community structure in the concept network to group ideas into a set of important themes, which we refined through discussion into seven essential concepts. The students played a major role in this development process by providing insights and perspectives that were often unrecognized by researchers and educators. The final result, "Network Literacy: Essential Concepts and Core Ideas", is now available as a booklet in several different languages from http://tinyurl.com/networkliteracy .
  • We present NetSci High, our NSF-funded educational outreach program that connects high school students who are underrepresented in STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics), and their teachers, with regional university research labs and provides them with the opportunity to work with researchers and graduate students on team-based, year-long network science research projects, culminating in a formal presentation at a network science conference. This short paper reports the content and materials that we have developed to date, including lesson plans and tools for introducing high school students and teachers to network science; empirical evaluation data on the effect of participation on students' motivation and interest in pursuing STEM careers; the application of professional development materials for teachers that are intended to encourage them to use network science concepts in their lesson plans and curriculum; promoting district-level interest and engagement; best practices gained from our experiences; and the future goals for this project and its subsequent outgrowth.