• Resonance is an ubiquitous phenomenon present in many systems. In particular, air resonance in cavities was studied by Hermann von Helmholtz in the 1850s. Originally used as acoustic filters, Helmholtz resonators are rigid-wall cavities which reverberate at given fixed frequencies. An adjustable type of resonator is the so-called universal Helmholtz resonator, a device consisting of two sliding cylinders capable of producing sounds over a continuous range of frequencies. Here we propose a simple experiment using a smartphone and normal bottle of tea, with a nearly uniform cylindrical section, which, filled with water at different levels, mimics a universal Helmholtz resonator. Blowing over the bottle, different sounds are produced. Taking advantage of the great processing capacity of smartphones, sound spectra together with frequencies of resonance are obtained in real time.
  • The spatial dependence of magnetic fields in simple configurations is an usual topic in introductory electromagnetism lessons, both in high school and in university courses. In typical experiments, magnetic fields are obtained taking point-by-point values using a Hall sensor and distances are measured using a ruler. Here, we show how to take advantage of the smartphone capabilities to get simultaneous measures with the built-in accelerometer and magnetometer and to obtain the spatial dependence of magnetic fields. We consider a simple set up consisting of a smartphone mounted on a track whose direction coincides with the axis of a coil. While the smartphone is smoothly accelerated, both the magnetic field and the distance from the center of the coil (integrated numerically from the acceleration values) are simultaneously obtained. This methodology can be easily extended to more complicated setups.
  • Originally an empirical law, nowadays Malus' law is seen as a key experiment to demonstrate the transverse nature of electromagnetic waves, as well as the intrinsic connection between optics and electromagnetism. In this work, a simple and inexpensive setup is proposed to quantitatively verify the nature of polarized light. A flat computer screen serves as a source of linear polarized light and a smartphone (possessing ambient light and orientation sensors) is used, thanks to its built-in sensors, to experiment with polarized light and verify the Malus' law.
  • The characteristics of the inner layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, are determinant for the earth's life. In this experience we explore the first hundreds of meters using a smartphone mounted on a quadcopter. Both the altitude and the pressure are obtained using the smartphone's sensors. We complement these measures with data collected from the flight information system of an aircraft. The experimental results are compared with the International Standard Atmosphere and other simple approximations: isothermal and constant density atmospheres.
  • Remotely-controlled helicopters and planes have been used as toys for decades. However, only recently, advances in sensor technologies have made possible to easily flight and control theses devices at an affordable price. Along with their increasing availability the educational opportunities are also proliferating. Here, a simple experiment in which a smartphone is mounted on a quadcopter is proposed to investigate the basics of a flight. Thanks to the smartphone's built-in accelerometer and gyroscope, take off, landing and yaw are analyzed.
  • The Atwood machine is a simple device used for centuries to demonstrate the Newton's second law. It consists of two supports containing different masses joined by a string. Here, we propose an experiment in which a smartphone is fixed to one support. With the aid of the built-in accelerometer of the smartphone the vertical acceleration is registered. By redistributing the masses of the supports, a linear relationship between the mass difference and the vertical acceleration is obtained. In this experiment, the use of a smartphone contributes to enhance a classical demonstration.