• We present abundance measurements of elements O, C, Si and Fe for three gas-rich galaxies at z~5 using observations from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Keck telescope in order to better constrain the early chemical enrichment of gas-rich galaxies. These galaxies show strong Lyman-{\alpha} absorption in the spectra of background quasars, with neutral hydrogen column densities log N${_H{}_I}$(cm$^{-2}$)=20.10$\pm$0.15, 20.10$\pm$0.15, and 20.80$\pm$0.15. Using the undepleted element O, we find the metallicities [O/H] to be in the range of -2.51 to -2.05 dex. Our study has doubled the existing sample of measurements of undepleted elements at z>4.5. Combining our measurements with those from the literature, we find that the N${_H{}_I}$-weighted mean metallicity of z~5 absorbers is consistent with the prediction based on z<4.5 DLAs. Thus, we find no significant evidence of a sudden drop in metallicity at z>4.7 as reported by some prior studies. We also determine the extent of dust depletion using a combination of both the volatile element O and the refractory elements Si and/or Fe. Some of the absorbers show evidence of depletion of elements on dust grains, e.g. low [Si/O] or [Fe/O]. The relative abundances of these absorbers along with other z~5 absorbers from the literature show some peculiarities, e.g. low [C/O] in several absorbers and high [Si/O] in one absorber. Finally, we find that the metallicity vs. velocity dispersion relation of z~5 absorbers may be different from that of lower-redshift absorbers.
  • We present new MUSE observations of quasar field Q2131-1207 with a log N(HI)=19.50+/-0.15 sub-DLA at z_abs=0.42980. We detect four galaxies at a redshift consistent with that of the absorber where only one was known before this study. Two of these are star forming galaxies, while the ones further away from the quasar (>140 kpc) are passive galaxies. We report the metallicities of the HII regions of the closest objects (12+log(O/H)=8.98+/-0.02 and 8.32+/-0.16) to be higher or equivalent within the errors to the metallicity measured in absorption in the neutral phase of the gas (8.15+/-0.20). For the closest object, a detailed morpho-kinematic analysis indicates that it is an inclined large rotating disk with V_max=200+/-3 km/s. We measure the masses to be M_dyn=7.4+/-0.4 x 10^10 M_sun and M_halo=2.9+/-0.2 x 10^12 M_sun. Some of the gas seen in absorption is likely to be co-rotating with the halo of that object, possibly due to a warped disk. The azimuthal angle between the quasar line of sight and the projected major axis of the galaxy on the sky is 12+/-1 degrees which indicates that some other fraction of the absorbing gas might be associated with accreting gas. This is further supported by the galaxy to gas metallicity difference. Based on the same arguments, we exclude outflows as a possibility to explain the gas in absorption. The four galaxies form a large structure (at least 200 kpc wide) consistent with a filament or a galaxy group so that a fraction of the absorption could be related to intra-group gas.
  • We present the study of a sample of nine QSO fields, with damped-Ly-alpha (DLA) or sub-DLA systems at z~0.6, observed with the X-Shooter spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. By suitably positioning the X-Shooter slit based on high spatial resolution images of HST/ACS we are able to detect absorbing galaxies in 7 out of 9 fields (~ 78\% success rate) at impact parameters from 10 to 30 kpc. In 5 out of 7 fields the absorbing galaxies are confirmed via detection of multiple emission lines at the redshift of DLAs where only 1 out of 5 also emits a faint continuum. In 2 out of these 5 fields we detect a second galaxy at the DLA redshift. Extinction corrected star formation rates (SFR) of these DLA-galaxies, estimated using their H-alpha fluxes, are in the range 0.3-6.7 M_sun yr^-1. The emission metallicities of these five DLA-galaxies are estimated to be from 0.2 to 0.9 Z_sun. Based on the Voigt profile fits to absorption lines we find the metallicity of the absorbing neutral gas to be in a range of 0.05--0.6 Z_sun. The two remaining DLA-galaxies are quiescent galaxies with SFR < 0.4 M_sun yr^-1 (3-sigma) presenting continuum emission but weak or no emission lines. Using X-Shooter spectrum we estimate i-band absolute magnitude of -19.5+/-0.2 for both these DLA-galaxies that indicates they are sub-L* galaxies. Comparing our results with that of other surveys in the literature we find a possible redshift evolution of the SFR of DLA-galaxies.
  • Element abundances in high-redshift quasar absorbers offer excellent probes of the chemical enrichment of distant galaxies, and can constrain models for population III and early population II stars. Recent observations indicate that the sub-damped Lyman-alpha (sub-DLA) absorbers are more metal-rich than DLA absorbers at redshifts 0$<$$z$$<$3. It has also been suggested that the DLA metallicity drops suddenly at $z$$>$4.7. However, only 3 DLAs at $z$$>$4.5 and none at $z$$>$3.5 have "dust-free" metallicity measurements of undepleted elements. We report the first quasar sub-DLA metallicity measurement at $z$$>$3.5, from detections of undepleted elements in high-resolution data for a sub-DLA at $z$=5.0. We obtain fairly robust abundances of C, O, Si, and Fe, using lines outside the Lyman-alpha forest. This absorber is metal-poor, with O/H]=-2.00$\pm$0.12, which is $\gtrsim$4$\sigma$ below the level expected from extrapolation of the trend for $z$$<$3.5 sub-DLAs. The C/O ratio is 1.8$^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$ times lower than in the Sun. More strikingly, Si/O is 3.2$^{+0.6}_{-0.5}$ times lower than in the Sun, while Si/Fe is nearly (1.2$^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$ times) solar. This absorber does not display a clear alpha/Fe enhancement. Dust depletion may have removed more Si from the gas phase than is common in the Milky Way interstellar medium, which may be expected if high-redshift supernovae form more silicate-rich dust. C/O and Si/O vary substantially between different velocity components, indicating spatial variations in dust depletion and/or early stellar nucleosynethesis (e.g., population III star initial mass function). The higher velocity gas may trace an outflow enriched by early stars.
  • Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • The use of background quasars provides a powerful tool to probe the cool gas in the circum-galactic medium of foreground galaxies. Here, we present new observations with SINFONI and X-Shooter of absorbing-galaxy candidates at z=0.7-1. We report the detection with both instruments of the H-alpha emission line of one sub-DLA at z_abs=0.94187 with log N(HI)=19.38^+0.10_-0.15 towards SDSS J002133.27+004300.9. We estimate the star formation rate: SFR=3.6+/-2.2 solar masses per year in that system. A detailed kinematic study indicates a dynamical mass M_dyn=10^9.9+/-0.4 solar masses and a halo mass M_halo=10^11.9+/-0.5 solar masses. In addition, we report the OII detection with X-Shooter of another DLA at z_abs=0.7402 with log N(HI)=20.4+/-0.1 toward Q0052+0041 and an estimated SFR of 5.3+/-0.7 solar masses per year. Three other objects are detected in the continuum with X-Shooter but the nature and redshift of two of these objects are unconstrained due to the absence of emission lines, while the third object might be at the redshift of the quasar. We use the objects detected in our whole N(HI)-selected SINFONI survey to compute the metallicity difference between the galaxy and the absorbing gas, delta_HI(X), where a positive (negative) value indicates infall (outflow). We compare this quantity with the quasar line of sight alignment with the galaxy's major (minor) axis, another tracer of infall (outflow). We find that these quantities do not correlate as expected from simple assumptions. Additional observations are necessary to relate these two independent probes of gas flows around galaxies.
  • We report Keck/ESI and VLT/UVES observations of three super-damped Lyman-alpha quasar absorbers with H I column densities log N(HI) >= 21.7 at redshifts z=2-2.5. All three absorbers show similar metallicities (-1.3 to -1.5 dex), and dust depletion of Fe, Ni, and Mn. Two of the absorbers show supersolar [S/Zn] and [Si/Zn]. We combine our results with those for other DLAs to examine trends between N(HI), metallicity, dust depletion. A larger fraction of the super-DLAs lie close to or above the line [X/H]=20.59-log N(HI) in the metallicity vs. N(HI) plot, compared to the less gas-rich DLAs, suggesting that super-DLAs are more likely to be rich in molecules. Unfortunately, our data for Q0230-0334 and Q0743+1421 do not cover H2 absorption lines. For Q1418+0718, some H2 lines are covered, but not detected. CO is not detected in any of our absorbers. For DLAs with log N(HI) < 21.7, we confirm strong correlation between metallicity and Fe depletion, and find a correlation between metallicity and Si depletion. For super-DLAs, these correlations are weaker or absent. The absorbers toward Q0230-0334 and Q1418+0718 show potential detections of weak Ly-alpha emission, implying star formation rates of about 1.6 and 0.7 solar masses per year, respectively (ignoring dust extinction). Upper limits on the electron densities from C II*/C II or Si II*/Si II are low, but are higher than the median values in less gas-rich DLAs. Finally, systems with log N(HI) > 21.7 may have somewhat narrower velocity dispersions delta v_90 than the less gas-rich DLAs, and may arise in cooler and/or less turbulent gas.
  • This White Paper presents the scientific motivations for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) on the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The MOS case draws on all fields of contemporary astronomy, from extra-solar planets, to the study of the halo of the Milky Way and its satellites, and from resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies out to observations of the earliest 'first-light' structures in the partially-reionised Universe. The material presented here results from thorough discussions within the community over the past four years, building on the past competitive studies to agree a common strategy toward realising a MOS capability on the E-ELT. The cases have been distilled to a set of common requirements which will be used to define the MOSAIC instrument, entailing two observational modes ('high multiplex' and 'high definition'). When combined with the unprecedented sensitivity of the E-ELT, MOSAIC will be the world's leading MOS facility. In analysing the requirements we also identify a high-multiplex MOS for the longer-term plans for the E-ELT, with an even greater multiplex (>1000 targets) to enable studies of large-scale structures in the high-redshift Universe. Following the green light for the construction of the E-ELT the MOS community, structured through the MOSAIC consortium, is eager to realise a MOS on the E-ELT as soon as possible. We argue that several of the most compelling cases for ELT science, in highly competitive areas of modern astronomy, demand such a capability. For example, MOS observations in the early stages of E-ELT operations will be essential for follow-up of sources identified by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In particular, multi-object adaptive optics and accurate sky subtraction with fibres have both recently been demonstrated on sky, making fast-track development of MOSAIC feasible.
  • The circumgalactic medium (CGM) of typical galaxies is crucial to our understanding of the cycling of gas into, through and out of galaxies. One way to probe the CGM is to study gas around galaxies detected via the absorption lines they produce in the spectra of background quasars. Here, we present medium resolution and new ~0.4-arcsec resolution (~3 kpc at z~1) 3D observations with VLT/SINFONI of galaxies responsible for high-N(HI) quasar absorbers. These data allow to determine in details the kinematics of the objects: the four z~1 objects are found to be rotation-supported as expected from inclined discs, while the fifth z~2 system is dispersion-dominated. Two of the systems show sign of interactions and merging. In addition, we use several indicators (star formation per unit area, a comparison of emission and absorption kinematics, arguments based on the inclination and the orientation of the absorber to the quasar line-of-sight and the distribution of metals) to determine the direction of the gas flows in and out of these galaxies. In some cases, our observations are consistent with the gas seen in absorption being due to material co-rotating with their halos. In the case of absorbing-galaxies towards Q1009-0026 and Q2222-0946, these indicators point toward the presence of an outflow traced in absorption.
  • We present a detailed study of the emission from a z = 2.35 galaxy that causes damped Lyman-alpha absorption in the spectrum of the background QSO, SDSS J 2222-0946. We present the results of extensive analyses of the stellar continuum covering the rest frame optical-UV regime based on broad-band HST imaging, and of spectroscopy from VLT/X-Shooter of the strong emission lines: Ly-alpha, [OII], [OIII], [NII], H-alpha and H-beta. We compare the metallicity from the absorption lines in the QSO spectrum with the oxygen abundance inferred from the strong-line methods (R23 and N2). The two emission-line methods yield consistent results: [O/H] = -0.30+/-0.13. Based on the absorption lines in the QSO spectrum a metallicity of -0.49+/-0.05 is inferred at an impact parameter of 6.3 kpc from the centre of the galaxy with a column density of hydrogen of log(N_HI)=20.65+/-0.05. The star formation rates of the galaxy from the UV continuum and H-alpha line can be reconciled assuming an amount of reddening of E(B-V) = 0.06+/-0.01, giving an inferred SFR of 13+/-1 M_sun / yr (assuming a Chabrier IMF). From the HST imaging, the galaxy associated with the absorption is found to be a compact (re=1.12 kpc) object with a disc-like, elongated (axis ratio 0.17) structure indicating that the galaxy is seen close to edge on. Moreover, the absorbing gas is located almost perpendicularly above the disc of the galaxy suggesting that the gas causing the absorption is not co-rotating with the disc. We investigate the stellar and dynamical masses from SED-fitting and emission-line widths, respectively, and find consistent results of 2x10^9 M_sun. We suggest that the galaxy is a young proto-disc with evidence for a galactic outflow of enriched gas. This galaxy hints at how star-forming galaxies may be linked to the elusive population of damped Lyman-alpha absorbers.
  • We present chemical abundance measurements from high-resolution observations of 5 sub-damped Lyman-alpha absorbers at 1.7 < z < 2.4 observed with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) spectrograph on the 6.5-m Magellan II Clay telescope. Lines of Zn II, Mg I, Mg II, Al II, Al III, S II, Si II, Si IV, C II, C II*, C IV, Ni II, Mn II and Fe II were detected and column densities were determined. The metallicity of the absorbing gas, inferred from the nearly undepleted element Zn, is in the range of < -0.95 to +0.25 dex for the five absorbers in our sample, with three of the systems being near-solar or super-solar. We also investigate the effect of ionisation on the observed abundances using photoionisation modelling. Combining our data with other sub-DLA and DLA data from the literature, we report the most complete existing determination of the metallicity vs. redshift relation for sub-DLAs and DLAs. We confirm the suggestion from previous investigations that sub-DLAs are, on average, more metal-rich than DLAs and evolve faster. We also discuss relative abundances and abundance ratios in these absorbers. The more metal-rich systems show significant dust depletion levels, as suggested by the ratios [Zn/Cr] and [Zn/Fe]. For the majority of the systems in our sample, the [Mn/Fe] vs. [Zn/H] trend is consistent with that seen previously for lower-redshift sub-DLAs. We also measure the velocity width values for the sub-DLAs in our sample from unsaturated absorption lines of Fe II 2344, 2374, 2600 A, and examine where these systems lie in a plot of metallicity vs. velocity dispersion. Finally, we examine cooling rate vs. H I column density in these sub-DLAs, and compare this with the data from DLAs and the Milky Way ISM. We find that most of the systems in our sample show higher cooling rate values compared to those seen in the DLAs.
  • The growth of luminous structures and the building blocks of life in the Universe began as primordial gas was processed in stars and mixed at galactic scales. The mechanisms responsible for this development are not well understood and have changed over the intervening 13 billion years. To follow the evolution of matter over cosmic time, it is necessary to study the strongest (resonance) transitions of the most abundant species in the Universe. Most of them are in the ultraviolet (UV; 950A-3000A) spectral range that is unobservable from the ground. A versatile space observatory with UV sensitivity a factor of 50-100 greater than existing facilities will revolutionize our understanding of the Universe. Habitable planets grow in protostellar discs under ultraviolet irradiation, a by-product of the star-disk interaction that drives the physical and chemical evolution of discs and young planetary systems. The electronic transitions of the most abundant molecules are pumped by the UV field, providing unique diagnostics of the planet-forming environment that cannot be accessed from the ground. Earth's atmosphere is in constant interaction with the interplanetary medium and the solar UV radiation field. A 50-100 times improvement in sensitivity would enable the observation of the key atmospheric ingredients of Earth-like exoplanets (carbon, oxygen, ozone), provide crucial input for models of biologically active worlds outside the solar system, and provide the phenomenological baseline to understand the Earth atmosphere in context. In this white paper, we outline the key science that such a facility would make possible and outline the instrumentation to be implemented.
  • The results of a large area, ~600 deg^2, K-band flux-limited spectroscopic survey for luminous quasars are presented. The survey utilises the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) in regions of sky within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. The K-band excess (KX) of all quasars with respect to Galactic stars is exploited in combination with a photometric redshift/classification scheme to identify quasar candidates for spectroscopic follow-up observations. The data contained within this investigation will be able to provide new constraints on the fraction of luminous quasars reddened by dust with E(B-V)<=0.5 mag. The spectroscopic sample is defined using the K-band, 14.0<=K<=16.6, and SDSS i-band limits of i=19.5, 19.7 and 22.0 over sky areas of 287, 150 and 196 deg^2, respectively. The survey includes >3200 known quasars from the SDSS and more than 250 additional confirmed quasars from the KX-selection. A well-defined sub-sample of quasars in the redshift interval 1.0<=z<=3.5 includes 1152 objects from the SDSS and 172 additional KX-selected quasars. The quasar selection is >95 per cent complete with respect to known SDSS quasars and >95 per cent efficient, largely independent of redshift and i-band magnitude. The properties of the new KX-selected quasars confirm the known redshift-dependent effectiveness of the SDSS quasar selection and provide a sample of luminous quasars experiencing intermediate levels of extinction by dust. The catalogue represents an important step towards the assembly of a well-defined sample of luminous quasars that may be used to investigate the properties of quasars experiencing intermediate levels of dust extinction within their host galaxies or due intervening absorption line systems.
  • We report the discovery of a "super-damped" Lyman-alpha absorber at $z_{abs}=2.2068$ toward QSO Q1135-0010 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and follow-up VLT UVES spectroscopy. Voigt profile fit to the DLA line indicates log $N_{\rm H I} = 22.05 \pm 0.1$. This is the second QSO DLA discovered to date with such high $N_{\rm H I}$. We derive element abundances [Si/H] = $-1.10 \pm 0.10$, [Zn/H] = $-1.06 \pm 0.10$, [Cr/H] = $-1.55 \pm 0.10$, [Ni/H] = $-1.60 \pm 0.10$, [Fe/H] = $-1.76 \pm 0.10$, [Ti/H] = $-1.69 \pm 0.11$, [P/H] = $-0.93 \pm 0.23$, and [Cu/H] = $-0.75 \pm 0.14$. Our data indicate detection of Ly-$\alpha$ emission in the DLA trough, implying a star formation rate of $\sim$10 $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ in the absence of dust attenuation. C II$^{*} \, \lambda 1336$ absorption is also detected, suggesting SFR surface density $-2 < {\rm log} \, \dot{\psi_{*}} < 0$ $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$. We estimate electron density in the range $3.5 \times 10^{-4}$ to 24.7 cm$^{-3}$ from C II$^{*}$/C II, and $\sim$0.5-0.9 cm$^{-3}$ from Si II$^{*}$/Si II. Overall, this is a robustly star-forming, moderately enriched absorber, but with relatively low dust depletion. Fitting of the SDSS spectrum yields low reddening for Milky Way, LMC, or SMC extinction curves. No CO absorption is detected, and C I absorption is weak. The low dust and molecular content, reminiscent of some SMC sight-lines, may result from the lower metallicity, and a stronger radiation field (due to higher SFR). Finally, we compare this absorber with other QSO and GRB DLAs.
  • We report three additional SINFONI detections of H-alpha emission line from quasar absorbers, two of which are new identifications. These were targeted among a sample of systems with log N(HI)>19.0 and metallicities measured from high-resolution spectroscopy. The detected galaxies are at impact parameters ranging from 6 to 12 kpc from the quasar's line-of-sight. We derive star formation rates (SFR) of a few solar masses per year for the two absorbers at z_abs~1 and SFR=17 solar masses per year for the DLA at z_abs~2. These three detections are found among a sample of 16 DLAs and sub-DLAs (5 at z_abs~1 and 7 at z_abs~2). For the remaining undetected galaxies, we derive flux limits corresponding to SFR<0.1--11.0 solar masses per year depending on redshift of the absorber and depth of the data. When combined with previous results from our survey for galaxy counterparts to HI-selected absorbers, we find a higher probability of detecting systems with higher metallicity as traced by dust-free [Zn/H] metallicity. We also report a higher detection rate with SINFONI for host galaxies at z_abs~1 than for systems at z_abs~2. Using the NII/H-alpha ratio, we can thus compare absorption and emission metallicities in the same high-redshift objects, more than doubling the number of systems for which such measures are possible.
  • Detailed studies of Damped and sub-Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLA), the galaxies probed by the absorption they produce in the spectra of background quasars, rely on identifying the galaxy responsible for the absorber with more traditional methods. Integral field spectroscopy provides an efficient way of detecting faint galaxies near bright quasars, further providing immediate redshift confirmation. Here, we report the detection of H-alpha emission from a DLA and a sub-DLA galaxy among a sample of 6 intervening quasar absorbers targeted. We derive F(H-alpha)=7.7+/-2.7*10^-17 erg/s/cm^2 (SFR=1.8+/-0.6 M_sun/yr) at impact parameter b=25 kpc towards quasar Q0302-223 for the DLA at z_abs=1.009 and F(H-alpha)=17.1+/-6.0*10^-17 erg/s/cm^2 (SFR=2.9+/-1.0 M_sun/yr) at b=39 kpc towards Q1009-0026 for the sub-DLA at z_abs=0.887. These results are in line with low star formation rates previously reported in the literature for quasar absorbers. We use the NII 6585/H-alpha ratio to derive the HII emission metallicities and compare them with the neutral gas H I absorption metallicities derived from high-resolution spectra. In one case, the absorption metallicity is actually found to be higher than the emission line metallicity. For the remaining objects, we achieve 3-sigma limiting fluxes of the order F(H-alpha)~10^-17 erg/s/cm^2 (corresponding to SFR~ 0.1 M_sun/yr at z~1 and ~1 M_sun/yr at z~2), i.e. among the lowest that have been possible with ground-based observations. We also present two other galaxies associated with C IV systems and serendipitously discovered in our data.
  • Details of processes through which galaxies convert their gas into stars need to be studied in order to obtain a complete picture of galaxy formation. One way to tackle these phenomena is to relate the HI gas and the stars in galaxies. Here, we present dynamical properties of Damped and sub-Damped Lyman-alpha Systems identified in H-alpha emission with VLT/SINFONI at near infra-red wavelengths. While the DLA towards Q0302-223 is found to be dispersion-dominated, the sub-DLA towards Q1009-0026 shows clear signatures of rotation. We use a proxy to circular velocity to estimate the mass of the halo in which the sub-DLA resides and find M_halo=10^12.6 M_sun. We also derive dynamical masses of these objects, and find M_dyn=10^10.3 M_sun and 10^10.9 M_sun. For one of the two systems (towards Q0302-223), we are able to derive a stellar mass of M_*=10^9.5 M_sun from Spectral Energy Distribution fit. The gas fraction in this object is 1/3rd, comparable to similar objects at these redshifts. Our work illustrates that detailed studies of quasar absorbers can offer entirely new insights into our knowledge of the interaction between stars and the interstellar gas in galaxies.
  • We consider the questions of whether the damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorbers in quasar spectra differ intrinsically in metallicity, and whether they could arise in galaxies of different masses. Using the recent measurements of the robust metallicity indicators Zn and S in DLAs and sub-DLAs, we confirm that sub-DLAs have higher mean metallicities than DLAs, especially at $z \lesssim 2$. We find that the intercept of the metallicity-redshift relation derived from Zn and S is higher than that derived from Fe by 0.5-0.6 dex. We also show that, while there is a correlation between the metallicity and the rest equivalent width of Mg II $\lambda 2796$ or Fe II $\lambda 2599$ for DLAs, no correlation is seen for sub-DLAs. Given this, and the similar Mg II or Fe II selection criteria employed in the discovery of both types of systems at lower redshifts, the difference between metallicities of DLAs and sub-DLAs appears to be real and not an artefact of selection. This conclusion is supported by our simulations of Mg II $\lambda 2796$ and Fe II $\lambda 2599$ lines for a wide range of physical conditions. On examining the velocity spreads of the absorbers, we find that sub-DLAs show somewhat higher mean and median velocity spreads ($\Delta v$), and an excess of systems with $\Delta v > 150$ km s$^{-1}$, than DLAs. Compared to DLAs, the [Mn/Fe] vs. [Zn/H] trend for sub-DLAs appears to be steeper and closer to the trend for Galactic bulge and thick disk stars, possibly suggesting different stellar populations. The absorber data appear to be consistent with galaxy down-sizing. The data are also consistent with the relative number densities of low-mass and high-mass galaxies. It is thus plausible that sub-DLAs arise in more massive galaxies on average than DLAs.
  • We have combined the results from our recent observations of Damped and sub-Damped Lyman-alpha systems with the MIKE and UVES spectrographs on the Magellan Clay and VLT Kueyen telescopes with ones from the literature to determine the N(HI)-weighted mean metallicity of these systems based both on Fe, a depleted element in QSO absorbers and the local ISM, and Zn a relatively undepleted element. In each case, the N(HI)-weighted mean metallicity is higher and shows faster evolution in sub-DLAs than the classical DLA systems. Large grids of photoionisation models over the sub-DLA \nhI range with CLOUDY show that the ionisation corrections to the abundances are in general small, however the fraction of ionized H can be up to ~90 per cent. The individual spectra have been shifted to the rest frame of the absorber and averaged together to determine the average properties of these systems at z<1.5. We find that the average abundance pattern of the Sub-DLA systems is similar to the gas in the halo of the Milky Way, with an offset of ~0.3 dex in the overall metallicity. Both DLAs and Sub-DLAs show similar characteristics in their relative abundances patterns, although the DLAs have smaller <[Mn/Zn]> as well as higher <[Ti/Zn]> and <[Cr/Zn]>. We calculate the contribution of sub-DLAs to the metal budget of the Universe, and find that the sub-DLA systems at z<1.5 contain a comoving density of metals Omega_met (3.5-15.8)x10^{5} M_sun Mpc^{-3}, at least twice the comoving density of metals in the DLA systems. The sub-DLAs do however track global chemical evolution models much more closely than do the DLAs, perhaps indicating that they are a less dust biased metallicity indicator of galaxies at high redshifts than the DLA systems.
  • The Damped and sub-Damped Lyman-alpha (DLA and sub-DLA) systems seen in the spectra of QSOs offer a unique way to study the interstellar medium of high redshift galaxies. In this paper we report on new abundance determinations in a sample of 10 new systems, nine of the lesser studied sub-DLAs and one DLA, along the line of sight to seven QSOs from spectra taken with the MIKE spectrograph. Lines of Mg I, Mg II, Al II, Al III, Ca II, Mn II, Fe II, and Zn II were detected. Here, we give the column densities and equivalent widths of the observed absorption lines, as well as the abundances determined for these systems. Zn, a relatively undepleted element in the local interstellar medium (ISM) is detected in one system with a high metallicity of [Zn/H]=+0.27\pm0.18. In one other system, a high abundance based on the more depleted element Fe is seen with [Fe/H]=-0.37\pm0.13, although Zn is not detected. The N(HI)-weighted mean metallicity of these sub-DLA systems based on Fe is <[Fe/H]>=-0.76\pm0.11, nearly ~0.7 dex higher (a factor of 5) than what is seen in DLAs in this redshift range. The relative abundance of [Mn/Fe] is also investigated. A clear trend is visible for these systems as well as systems from the literature, with [Mn/Fe] increasing with increasing metallicity in good agreement with with Milky Way stellar abundances.
  • The GALEX (Galaxy Evolution Explorer) spectroscopic survey mode, with a resolution of about 8 A in the FUV (1350 - 1750 A) and about 20 A in the NUV (1950 - 2750 A) is used for a systematic search of Ly-a emitting galaxies at low redshift. This aims at filling a gap between high-redshift surveys and a small set of objects studied in detail in the nearby universe. A blind search of 7018 spectra extracted in 5 deep exposures (5.65 sq.deg) has resulted in 96 Ly-a emitting galaxy candidates in the FUV domain, after accounting for broad-line AGNs. The Ly-a EWs (equivalent width) are consistent with stellar population model predictions and show no trends as a function of UV color or UV luminosity, except a possible decrease in the most luminous that may be due to small-number statistics. Their distribution in EW is similar to that at z about 3 but their fraction among star-forming galaxies is smaller. Avoiding uncertain candidates, a sub-sample of 66 objects in the range 0.2 < z < 0.35 has been used to build a Ly-a LF (luminosity function). The incompleteness due to objects with significant Ly-a emission but a UV continuum too low for spectral extraction has been evaluated. A comparison with H-a LF in the same redshift domain is consistent with an average Ly-a/H-a of about 1 in about 15 % of the star-forming galaxies. A comparison with high-redshift Ly-a LFs implies an increase of the Ly-a luminosity density by a factor of about 16 from z about 0.3 to z about 3. By comparison with the factor 5 increase of the UV luminosity density in the same redshift range, this suggests an increase of the average Ly-a escape fraction with redshift.
  • We present chemical abundance measurements from medium resolution observations of 8 sub-damped Lyman-alpha absorber and 2 strong Lyman-limit systems at z < 1.5 observed with the MIKE spectrograph on the 6.5m Magellan II Clay telescope. These observations were taken as part of an ongoing project to determine abundances in z < 1.5 quasar absorption line systems (QSOALS) focusing on sub-DLA systems. These observations increase the sample of Zn measurements in z < 1.5 sub-DLAs by ~50%. Lines of Mg I, Mg II, Al II, Al III, Ca II, Mn II, Fe II, and Zn II were detected and column densities were determined. Zn II, a relatively undepleted element and tracer of the gas phase metallicity is detected in two of these systems, with [Zn/H]=-0.05\pm0.12 and [Zn/H]>+0.86. The latter system is however a weak system with N(H I)<18.8, and therefore may need significant ionisation corrections to the abundances. Fe II lines were detected in all systems, with an average Fe abundance of <[Fe/H]>=-0.68, higher than typical Fe abundances for DLA systems at these redshifts. This high mean [Fe/H] could be due to less depletion of Fe onto dust grains, or to higher abundances in these systems. We also discuss the relative abundances in these absorbers. The systems with high metallicity show high ratios of [Mn/Fe] and [Zn/Fe], as seen previously in another sub-DLA. These higher values of [Mn/Fe] could be a result of heavy depletion of Fe onto grains, unmixed gas, or an intrinsically non-solar abundance pattern. Based on Cloudy modeling, we do not expect ionisation effects to cause this phenomenon.
  • We have conducted a long slit search for low surface brightness Lyman-alpha emitters at redshift 2.67 < z < 3.75. A 92 hour long exposure with VLT/FORS2 down to a 1-sigma surface brightness detection limit of 8x10^-20 erg/cm2/s/sqarcsec yielded a sample of 27 single line emitters with fluxes of a few times 10^-18 erg/s/cm2. We present arguments that most objects are indeed Lyman-alpha. The large comoving number density, the large covering factor, dN/dz ~ 0.2-1, and the often extended Lyman-alpha emission suggest that the emitters be identified with the elusive host population of damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAS) and high column density Lyman limit systems. A small inferred star formation rate, perhaps supplanted by cooling radiation, appears to energetically dominate the Lyman-alpha emission, and is consistent with the low metallicity, low dust content, and theoretically inferred low masses of DLAS, and with the relative lack of success of earlier searches for their optical counterparts. (abridged)
  • An accurate method to measure the abundance of high-redshift galaxies consists in the observation of absorbers along the line of sight toward a background quasar. Here, we present abundance measurements of 13 z>3 sub-Damped Lyman-alpha Systems (quasar absorbers with HI column density 19 < log N(HI) < 20.3 cm^-2) based on the high resolution observations with VLT UVES spectrograph. These observations more than double the metallicity information for sub-DLAs previously available at z>3. This new data, combined with other sub-DLA measurements from the literature, confirm the stronger metallicity redshift evolution than for the classical Damped Lyman-alpha absorbers. Besides, these observations are used to compute for the first time the fraction of gas ionised from photo-ionisation modelling in a sample of sub-DLAs. Based on these results, we calculate that sub-DLAs contribute no more than 6% of the expected amount of metals at z~2.5. We therefore conclude that even if sub-DLAs are found to be more metal-rich than classical DLAs, they are insufficient to close the so-called ``missing metals problem''.
  • We present chemical abundance measurements from high resolution observations of 7 sub-damped Lyman-alpha absorbers and 1 damped Lyman-alpha system at z<1.5. Three of these objects have high metallicity, with near or super-solar Zn abundance. Grids of Cloudy models for each system were constructed to look for possible ionization effects in these systems. For the systems in which we could constrain the ionization parameter, we find that the ionization corrections as predicted by the Cloudy models are generally small and within the typical error bars (~0.15 dex), in general agreement with previous studies. The Al III to Al II ratio for these and other absorbers from the literature are compared, and we find that while the sub-DLAs have a larger scatter in the Al III to Al II ratios than the DLAs, there appears to be little correlation between the ratio and N(H I). The relationship between the metallicity and the velocity width of the profile for these systems is investigated. We show that the sub-DLAs that have been observed to date follow a similar trend as DLA absorbers, with the more metal rich systems exhibiting large velocity widths. We also find that the systems at the upper edge of this relationship with high metallicities and large velocity widths are more likely to be sub-DLAs than DLA absorbers, perhaps implying that the sub-DLA absorbers are more representative of massive galaxies.