• We constrain tilted spatially-flat and untilted non-flat XCDM dynamical dark energy inflation parameterizations with the Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data and recent Type Ia supernovae measurements, baryonic acoustic oscillations data, growth rate observations, and Hubble parameter measurements. Inclusion of the four non-CMB data sets leads to a significant strengthening of the evidence for non-flatness in the non-flat XCDM model from 1.1$\sigma$ for the CMB data alone to 3.4$\sigma$ for the full data combination. In this untilted non-flat XCDM case the data favor a spatially-closed model in which spatial curvature contributes a little less than a percent of the current cosmological energy budget; they also mildy favor dynamical dark energy over a cosmological constant at 1.2$\sigma$. These data are also better fit by the flat-XCDM parameterization than by the standard $\Lambda$CDM model, but only at 0.6$\sigma$ significance. Current data is unable to rule out dark energy dynamics. The non-flat XCDM parameterization is more consistent with the Dark Energy Survey constraints on the current value of the rms amplitude of mass fluctuations ($\sigma_8$) as a function of the current value of the nonrelativistic matter density parameter ($\Omega_m$) but does not provide as good a fit to the smaller-angle CMB anisotropy data as does the standard tilted flat-$\Lambda$CDM model. Some measured cosmological parameter values differ significantly when determined using the tilted flat-XCDM and the non-flat XCDM parameterizations, including the baryonic matter density parameter and the reionization optical depth.
  • We consider five dimensional conformal gravity theory which describes an anisotropic extra dimension. Reducing the theory to four dimensions yields Brans-Dicke theory with a potential and a hidden parameter $z$ which implements the anisotropy between the four dimensional spacetime and the extra dimension. We find that a range of value of the parameter $z$ can address the current dark energy density compared to the Planck energy density. Constraining the parameter $z$ and the other cosmological model parameters using the recent observational data consisting of the Hubble parameters, type Ia supernovae, and baryon acoustic oscillations, together with the Planck or WMAP 9-year data of the cosmic microwave background radiation, we find $z>-2.05$ for Planck data and $z>-2.09$ for WMAP 9-year data at 95\% confidence level. We also obtained constraints on the rate of change of the effective Newtonian constant~($G_{\rm eff}$) at present and the variation of $G_{\rm eff}$ since the epoch of recombination to be consistent with observation.
  • We use the physically-consistent tilted spatially-flat and non-flat $\Lambda\textrm{CDM}$ inflation models to constrain cosmological parameter values with the Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data and recent Type Ia supernovae measurements, baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) data, growth rate observations, and Hubble parameter measurements. The most dramatic consequence of including the four non-CMB data sets is the significant strengthening of the evidence for non-flatness in the non-flat $\Lambda$CDM model, from 1.8$\sigma$ for the CMB data alone to 5.1$\sigma$ for the full data combination. The BAO data is the most powerful of the non-CMB data sets in more tightly constraining model parameter values and in favoring a spatially-closed Universe in which spatial curvature contributes about a percent to the current cosmological energy budget. The non-flat $\Lambda$CDM model better fits the large-angle CMB anisotropy angular spectrum and is more consistent with the Dark Energy Survey constraints on the current value of the rms amplitude of mass fluctuations ($\sigma_8$) as a function of the current value of the nonrelativistic matter density parameter ($\Omega_m$) but does not provide as good a fit to the smaller-angle CMB anisotropy data as does the tilted flat-$\Lambda$CDM model. Some measured cosmological parameter values differ significantly between the two models, including the reionization optical depth and the baryonic matter density parameter, both of whose 2$\sigma$ ranges (in the two models) are disjoint or almost so.
  • We present a proof of the axion as a cold dark matter candidate to the fully nonlinear order perturbations based on Einstein's gravity. We consider the axion as a coherently oscillating massive classical scalar field without interaction. We present the fully nonlinear and exact, except for {\it ignoring} the transverse-tracefree tensor-type perturbation, hydrodynamic equations for an axion fluid in Einstein's gravity. We show that the axion has the characteristic pressure and anisotropic stress, the latter starts to appear from the second-order perturbation. But these terms do not directly affect the hydrodynamic equations in our axion treatment. Instead, what behaves as the effective pressure term in relativistic hydrodynamic equations is the perturbed lapse function and the relativistic result coincides exactly with the one known in the previous non-relativistic studies. The effective pressure term leads to a Jeans scale which is of the solar-system scale for conventional axion mass. As the fully nonlinear and relativistic hydrodynamic equations for an axion fluid coincide exactly with the ones of a zero-pressure fluid in the super-Jeans scale, we have proved the cold dark matter nature of such an axion in that scale.
  • The homogeneity of matter distribution at large scales, known as the cosmological principle, is a central assumption in the standard cosmological model. The case is testable though, thus no longer needs to be a principle. Here we perform a test for spatial homogeneity using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) sample by counting galaxies within a specified volume with the radius scale varying up to 300 Mpc/h. We directly confront the large-scale structure data with the definition of spatial homogeneity by comparing the averages and dispersions of galaxy number counts with allowed ranges of the random distribution with homogeneity. The LRG sample shows significantly larger dispersions of number counts than the random catalogues up to 300 Mpc/h scale, and even the average is located far outside the range allowed in the random distribution; the deviations are statistically impossible to be realized in the random distribution. This implies that the cosmological principle does not hold even at such large scales. The same analysis of mock galaxies derived from the N-body simulation, however, suggests that the LRG sample is consistent with the current paradigm of cosmology, thus the simulation is also not homogeneous in that scale. We conclude that the cosmological principle is not in the observed sky and nor is demanded to be there by the standard cosmological world model. This reveals the nature of the cosmological principle adopted in the modern cosmology paradigm, and opens new field of research in theoretical cosmology.
  • We investigate cosmology of massive electrodynamics and explore the possibility whether massive photon could provide an explanation of the dark energy. The action is given by the scalar-vector-tensor theory of gravity which is obtained by non-minimal coupling of the massive Stueckelberg QED with gravity and its cosmological consequences are studied by paying a particular attention to the role of photon mass. We find that the theory allows cosmological evolution where the radiation- and matter-dominated epochs are followed by a long period of virtually constant dark energy that closely mimics $\Lambda$CDM model and the main source of the current acceleration is provided by the nonvanishing photon mass governed by the relation $\Lambda\sim m^2$. A detailed numerical analysis shows that the nonvanishing photon mass of the order of $\sim 10^{-34}$ eV is consistent with the current observations. This magnitude is far less than the most stringent limit on the photon mass available so far, which is of the order of $m \leq 10^{-27}$eV.
  • We present fully nonlinear and exact cosmological perturbation equations in the presence of multiple components of fluids and minimally coupled scalar fields. We ignore the tensor-type perturbation. The equations are presented without taking the temporal gauge condition in the Friedmann background with general curvature and the cosmological constant. For each fluid component we ignore the anisotropic stress. The multiple component nature, however, introduces the anisotropic stress in the collective fluid quantities. We prove the Newtonian limit of multiple fluids in the zero-shear gauge and the uniform-expansion gauge conditions, present the Newtonian hydrodynamic equations in the presence of general relativistic pressure in the zero-shear gauge, and present the fully nonlinear equations and the third-order perturbation equations of the nonrelativistic pressure fluids in the CDM-comoving gauge.
  • We investigate aspects of axion as a coherently oscillating massive classical scalar field by analyzing third order perturbations in Einstein's gravity in the axion-comoving gauge. The axion fluid has its characteristic pressure term leading to an axion Jeans scale which is cosmologically negligible for a canonical axion mass. Our classically derived axion pressure term in Einstein's gravity is identical to the one derived in the non-relativistic quantum mechanical context in the literature. We show that except for the axion pressure term, the axion fluid equations are exactly the same as the general relativistic continuity and Euler equations of a zero-pressure fluid up to third order perturbation. The general relativistic density and velocity perturbations of the CDM in the CDM-comoving gauge are exactly the same as the Newtonian perturbations to the second order (in all scales), and the pure general relativistic corrections appearing from the third order are numerically negligible (in all scales as well) in the current paradigm of concordance cosmology. Therefore, here we prove that, in the super-Jeans scale, the classical axion can be handled as the Newtonian CDM fluid up to third order perturbation. We also show that the axion fluid supports the vector-type (rotational) perturbation from the third order. Our analysis includes the cosmological constant.
  • The $\Lambda$ cold dark matter ($\Lambda\textrm{CDM}$) model is currently known as the simplest cosmology model that best describes observations with minimal number of parameters. Here we introduce a cosmology model that is preferred over the conventional $\Lambda\textrm{CDM}$ one by constructing dark energy as the sum of the cosmological constant $\Lambda$ and the additional fluid that is designed to have an extremely short transient spike in energy density during the radiation-matter equality era and the early scaling behavior with radiation and matter densities. The density parameter of the additional fluid is defined as a Gaussian function plus a constant in logarithmic scale-factor space. Searching for the best-fit cosmological parameters in the presence of such a dark energy spike gives a far smaller chi-square value by about five times the number of additional parameters introduced and narrower constraints on matter density and Hubble constant compared with the best-fit $\Lambda\textrm{CDM}$ model. The significant improvement in reducing chi-square mainly comes from the better fitting of Planck temperature power spectrum around the third ($\ell \approx 800$) and sixth ($\ell \approx 1800$) acoustic peaks. The likelihood ratio test and the Akaike information criterion suggest that the model of dark energy spike is strongly favored by the current cosmological observations over the conventional $\Lambda\textrm{CDM}$ model. However, based on the Bayesian information criterion which penalizes models with more parameters, the strong evidence supporting the presence of dark energy spike disappears. Our result emphasizes that the alternative cosmological parameter estimation with even better fitting of the same observational data is allowed in the Einstein's gravity.
  • We investigate observational consequences of the early episodically dominating dark energy on the evolution of cosmological structures. For this aim, we introduce the minimally coupled scalar field dark energy model with the Albrecht-Skordis potential which allows a sudden ephemeral domination of dark energy component during the radiation or early matter era. The conventional cosmological parameters in the presence of such an early dark energy are constrained with WMAP and Planck cosmic microwave background radiation data including other external data sets. It is shown that in the presence of such an early dark energy the estimated cosmological parameters can deviate substantially from the currently known $\Lambda\textrm{CDM}$-based parameters, with best-fit values differing by several percents for WMAP and by a percent level for Planck data. For the latter case, only a limited amount of dark energy with episodic nature is allowed since the Planck data strongly favors the $\Lambda\textrm{CDM}$ model. Compared with the conventional dark energy model, the early dark energy dominating near radiation-matter equality or at the early matter era results in the shorter cosmic age or the presence of tensor-type perturbation, respectively. Our analysis demonstrates that the alternative cosmological parameter estimation is allowed based on the same observations even in Einstein's gravity.
  • We investigate the cosmology of massive spinor electrodynamics when torsion is non-vanishing. A non-minimal interaction is introduced between the torsion and the vector field and the coupling constant between them plays an important role in subsequential cosmology. It is shown that the mass of the vector field and torsion conspire to generate dark energy and pressureless dark matter, and for generic values of the coupling constant, the theory effectively provides an interacting model between them with an additional energy density of the form $\sim 1/a^6$. The evolution equations mimic $\Lambda$CDM behavior up to $1/a^3$ term and the additional term represents a deviation from $\Lambda$CDM. We show that the deviation is compatible with the observational data, if it is very small. We find that the non-minimal interaction is responsible for generating an effective cosmological constant which is directly proportional to the mass squared of the vector field and the mass of the photon within its current observational limit could be the source of the dark energy.
  • We prove that the axion as a coherently oscillating scalar field acts as a cold dark matter (CDM) to the second-order perturbations in all cosmological scales including the super-horizon scale. The proof is made in the axion-comoving gauge. For a canonical mass, the axion pressure term causes deviation from the CDM only on scales smaller than the Solar System size. Beyond such a small scale the equations of the axion fluid are the same as the ones of the CDM based on the CDM-comoving gauge which are exactly identical to the Newtonian equations to the second order. We also show that the axion fluid does not generate the rotational (vector-type) perturbation even to the second order. Thus, in the case of axion fluid, we have the relativistic/Newtonian correspondence to the second order, even considering the rotational perturbation. Our analysis is made in the presence of the cosmological constant, and can be easily extended to the realistic situation including other components of fluids and fields.
  • We estimate the power spectra of CMB temperature anisotropy in localized regions on the sky using the WMAP 7-year data. Here, we report that the north hat and the south hat regions at the high Galactic latitude (|b| >= 30 deg) show anomaly in the power spectrum amplitude around the third peak, which is statistically significant up to 3 sigma. We try to figure out the cause of the observed anomaly by analyzing the low Galactic latitude (|b|< 30 deg) regions where the galaxy contamination is expected to be stronger, and regions that are weakly or strongly dominated by the WMAP instrument noise. We also consider the possible effect of unresolved radio point sources. We found another but less statistically significant anomaly in the low Galactic latitude north and south regions whose behavior is opposite to the one at the high latitude. Our analysis shows that the observed north-south anomaly at high latitude becomes weaker on the regions with high number of observations (weak instrument noise), suggesting that the anomaly is significant at sky regions that are dominated by the WMAP instrument noise. We have checked that the observed north-south anomaly has weak dependences on the bin-width used in the power spectrum estimation and the Galactic latitude cut. We have also discussed the possibility that the detected anomaly may hinge on the particular choice of the multipole bin around the third peak. We anticipate that the issue of whether the anomaly is intrinsic one or due to the WMAP instrument noise will be resolved by the forthcoming Planck data.
  • Axion as a coherently oscillating scalar field is known to behave as a cold dark matter in all cosmologically relevant scales. For conventional axion mass with 10^{-5} eV, the axion reveals a characteristic damping behavior in the evolution of density perturbations on scales smaller than the solar system size. The damping scale is inversely proportional to the square-root of the axion mass. We show that the axion mass smaller than 10^{-24} eV induces a significant damping in the baryonic density power spectrum in cosmologically relevant scales, thus deviating from the cold dark matter in the scale smaller than the axion Jeans scale. With such a small mass, however, our basic assumption about the coherently oscillating scalar field is broken in the early universe. This problem is shared by other dark matter models based on the Bose-Einstein condensate and the ultra-light scalar field. We introduce a simple model to avoid this problem by introducing evolving axion mass in the early universe, and present observational effects of present-day low-mass axion on the baryon density power spectrum, the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) temperature power spectrum, and the growth rate of baryon density perturbation. In our low-mass axion model we have a characteristic small-scale cutoff in the baryon density power spectrum below the axion Jeans scale. The small-scale deviations from the cold dark matter model in both matter and CMB power spectra clearly differ from the ones expected in the cold dark matter model mixed with the massive neutrinos as a hot dark matter component.
  • We study characters of recent type Ia supernova (SNIa) data using evolving dark energy models with changing equation of state parameter w. We consider sudden-jump approximation of w for some chosen redshift spans with double transitions, and constrain these models based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method using the SNIa data (Constitution, Union, Union2) together with baryon acoustic oscillation A parameter and cosmic microwave background shift parameter in a flat background. In the double-transition model the Constitution data shows deviation outside 1 sigma from LCDM model at low (z < 0.2) and middle (0.2 < z < 0.4) redshift bins whereas no such deviations are noticeable in the Union and Union2 data. By analyzing the Union members in the Constitution set, however, we show that the same difference is actually due to different calibration of the same Union sample in the Constitution set, and is not due to new data added in the Constitution set. All detected deviations are within 2 sigma from the LCDM world model. From the LCDM mock data analysis, we quantify biases in the dark energy equation of state parameters induced by insufficient data with inhomogeneous distribution of data points in the redshift space and distance modulus errors. We demonstrate that location of peak in the distribution of arithmetic means (computed from the MCMC chain for each mock data) behaves as an unbiased estimator for the average bias, which is valid even for non-symmetric likelihood distributions.
  • The modified gravity with $f(R)=R^{1+\epsilon}$ ($\epsilon>0$) allows a scaling solution where the density of gravity sector follows the density of the dominant fluid. We present initial conditions of background and perturbation variables during the scaling evolution regime in the modified gravity. As a possible dark energy model we consider a gravity with a form $f(R)=R^{1+\epsilon}+qR^{-n}$ ($-1<n \le 0$) where the second term drives the late-time acceleration. We show that our $f(R)$ gravity parameters are very sensitive to the baryon perturbation growth and baryon density power spectrum, and present observational constraints on the model parameters. Our analysis suggests that only the parameter space extremely close to the $\Lambda\textrm{CDM}$ model is allowed.
  • Versions of parameterized pseudo-Newtonian gravity theories specially designed for cosmology have been introduced in recent cosmology literature. The modifications demand a zero-pressure fluid in the context of versions of modified Poisson-like equation with two different gravitational potentials. We consider such modifications in the context of relativistic gravity theories where the action is a general algebraic function of the scalar curvature, the scalar field, and the kinetic term of the field. In general it is not possible to isolate the zero-pressure fluid component simultaneously demanding a modification in the Poisson-like equation. Only in the small-scale limit we can realize some special forms of the attempted modifications. We address some loopholes in the possibility of showing non-Einstein gravity nature based on pseudo-Newtonian modifications in the cosmological context. We point out that future observations of gravitational weak lensing together with velocity perturbation can potentially test the validity of Einstein's gravity in cosmology context.
  • We study a generalized version of Chaplygin gas as unified model of dark matter and dark energy. Using realistic theoretical models and the currently available observational data from the age of the universe, the expansion history based on the type Ia supernovae, the matter power spectrum, the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropy power spectra, and the perturbation growth factor we put the unified model under observational test. As the model has only two free parameters in the flat Friedmann background [$\Lambda$CDM (cold dark matter) model has only one free parameter] we show that the model is already tightly constrained by currently available observations. The only parameter space extremely close to the $\Lambda$CDM model is allowed in this unified model.
  • We show the importance of properly including the perturbations of the dark energy component in the dynamical dark energy models based on a scalar field and modified gravity theories in order to meet with present and future observational precisions. Based on a simple scaling scalar field dark energy model, we show that observationally distinguishable substantial differences appear by ignoring the dark energy perturbation. By ignoring it the perturbed system of equations becomes inconsistent and deviations in (gauge-invariant) power spectra depend on the gauge choice.
  • The Yuan-Tseh Lee Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is the first interferometer dedicated to studying the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation at 3mm wavelength. The choice of 3mm was made to minimize the contributions from foreground synchrotron radiation and Galactic dust emission. The initial configuration of seven 0.6m telescopes mounted on a 6-m hexapod platform was dedicated in October 2006 on Mauna Loa, Hawaii. Scientific operations began with the detection of a number of clusters of galaxies via the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. We compare our data with Subaru weak lensing data in order to study the structure of dark matter. We also compare our data with X-ray data in order to derive the Hubble constant.
  • The general world model for homogeneous and isotropic universe has been roposed. For this purpose, we introduce a global and fiducial system of reference (world reference frame) constructed on a 5-dimensional space-time that is embedding the universe, and define the line element as the separation between two neighboring events that are distinct in space and time, as viewed in the world reference frame. The effect of cosmic expansion on the measurement of physical distance has been correctly included in the new metric, which differs from the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric where the spatial separation is measured for events on the hypersurface at a constant time while the temporal separation is measured for events at different time epochs. The Einstein's field equations with the new metric imply that closed, flat, and open universes are filled with positive, zero, and negative energy, respectively. We have demonstrated that the flat universe is empty and stationary, equivalent to the Minkowski space-time, and that the universe with positive energy density is always spatially closed and finite. In the closed universe, the proper time of a comoving observer does not elapse uniformly as judged in the world reference frame, in which both cosmic expansion and time-varying light speeds cannot exceed the limiting speed of the special relativity. We have also reconstructed cosmic evolution histories of the closed world models that are consistent with recent astronomical observations, and derived useful formulas such as energy-momentum relation of particles, redshift, total energy in the universe, cosmic distance and time scales, and so forth. It has also been shown that the inflation with positive acceleration at the earliest epoch is improbable.
  • We have measured the cosmic momentum power spectrum from the peculiar velocities of galaxies in the SFI sample. The SFI catalog contains field spiral galaxies with radial peculiar velocities derived from the I-band Tully-Fisher relation. As a natural measure of the large-scale peculiar velocity field, we use the cosmic momentum field that is defined as the peculiar velocity field weighted by local number of galaxies. We have shown that the momentum power spectrum can be derived from the density power spectrum for the constant linear biasing of galaxy formation, which makes it possible to estimate \beta_S = \Omega_m^{0.6} / b_S parameter precisely where \Omega_m is the matter density parameter and b_S is the bias factor for optical spiral galaxies. At each wavenumber k we estimate \beta_S(k) as the ratio of the measured to the derived momentum power over a wide range of scales (0.026 h^{-1}Mpc <~ k <~ 0.157 h^{-1}Mpc) that spans the linear to the quasi-linear regimes. The estimated \beta_S(k)'s have stable values around 0.5, which demonstrates the constancy of \beta_S parameter at scales down to 40 h^{-1}Mpc. We have obtained \beta_S=0.49_{-0.05}^{+0.08} or \Omega_m = 0.30_{-0.05}^{+0.09} b_S^{5/3}, and the amplitude of mass fluctuation as \sigma_8\Omega_m^{0.6}=0.56_{-0.21}^{+0.27}. The 68% confidence limits include the cosmic variance. We have also estimated the mass density power spectrum. For example, at k=0.1047 h Mpc^{-1} (\lambda=60 h^{-1}Mpc) we measure \Omega_m^{1.2} P_{\delta}(k)=(2.51_{-0.94}^{+0.91})\times 10^3 (h^{-1}Mpc)^3, which is lower compared to the high-amplitude power spectra found from the previous maximum likelihood analyses of peculiar velocity samples like Mark III, SFI, and ENEAR.
  • We present results from a test for the Gaussianity of the whole sky sub-degree scale CMB temperature anisotropy measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We calculate the genus from the foreground-subtracted and Kp0-masked WMAP maps and measure the genus shift parameters defined at negative and positive threshold levels and the asymmetry parameter to quantify the deviation from the Gaussian relation. At WMAP Q, V, and W bands, the genus and genus-related statistics imply that the observed CMB sky is consistent with Gaussian random phase field. However, from the genus measurement on the Galactic northern and southern hemispheres, we have found two non-Gaussian signatures at the W band resolution (0.35 degree scale), i.e., the large difference of genus amplitudes between the north and the south and the positive genus asymmetry in the south, which are statistically significant at 2.6 sigma and 2.4 sigma levels, respectively. The large genus amplitude difference also appears in the WMAP Q and V band maps, deviating the Gaussian prediction with a significance level of about 2 sigma. The probability that the genus curves show such a large genus amplitude difference exceeding the observed values at all Q, V, and W bands in a Gaussian sky is only 1.4%. Such non-Gaussian features are reduced as the higher Galactic cut is applied, but their dependence on the Galactic cut is weak. We discuss possible sources that can induce such non-Gaussian features, and conclude that the CMB data with higher signal-to-noise ratio and the accurate foreground model are needed to understand the non-Gaussian signatures.
  • We have simulated the interferometric observation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization fluctuations. We have constructed data pipelines from the time-ordered raw visibility samples to the CMB power spectra which utilize the methods of data compression, maximum likelihood analysis, and optimal subspace filtering. They are customized for three observational strategies, such as the single pointing, the mosaicking, and the drift-scanning. For each strategy, derived are the optimal strategy parameters that yield band power estimates with minimum uncertainty. The results are general and can be applied to any close-packed array on a single platform such as the CBI and the forthcoming AMiBA experiments. We have also studied the effect of rotation of the array platform on the band power correlation by simulating the CBI single pointing observation. It is found that the band power anti-correlations can be reduced by rotating the platform and thus densely sampling the visibility plane. This enables us to increase the resolution of the power spectrum in the l-space down to the limit of the sampling theorem (Delta l = 226 = pi / theta), which is narrower by a factor of about sqrt{2} than the resolution limit (Delta l = 300) used in the recent CBI single pointing observation. The validity of this idea is demonstrated for a two-element interferometer that samples visibilities uniformly in the uv-annulus. From the fact that the visibilities are the Fourier modes of the CMB field convolved with the beam, a fast unbiased estimator (FUE) of the CMB power spectra is developed and tested. It is shown that the FUE gives results very close to those from the quadratic estimator method without requiring large computer resources even though uncertainties in the results increase.
  • We have made a topological study of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps by simulating the AMiBA experiment results. A $\Lambda$CDM CMB sky is adopted to make mock interferometric observations designed for the AMiBA experiment. CMB polarization fields are reconstructed from the AMiBA mock visibility data using the maximum entropy method. We have also considered effects of Galactic foregrounds on the CMB polarization fields. The genus statistic is calculated from the simulated $Q$ and $U$ polarization maps, where $Q$ and $U$ are Stokes parameters. Our study shows that the Galactic foreground emission, even at low Galactic latitude, is expected to have small effects on the CMB polarization field. Increasing survey area and integration time is essential to detect non-Gaussian signals of cosmological origin through genus measurement.