• Materials with massless Dirac fermions can possess exceptionally strong and widely tunable optical nonlinearities. Experiments on graphene monolayer have indeed found very large third-order nonlinear responses, but the reported variation of the nonlinear optical coefficient by orders of magnitude is not yet understood. A large part of the difficulty is the lack of information on how doping or chemical potential affects the different nonlinear optical processes. Here we report the first experimental study, in corroboration with theory, on third harmonic generation (THG) and four-wave mixing (FWM) in graphene that has its chemical potential tuned by ion-gel gating. THG was seen to have enhanced by ~30 times when pristine graphene was heavily doped, while difference-frequency FWM appeared just the opposite. The latter was found to have a strong divergence toward degenerate FWM in undoped graphene, leading to a giant third-order nonlinearity. These truly amazing characteristics of graphene come from the possibility to gate-control the chemical potential, which selectively switches on and off one- and multi-photon resonant transitions that coherently contribute to the optical nonlinearity, and therefore can be utilized to develop graphene-based nonlinear optoelectronic devices.
  • Here we report the successful growth of MoSe2 on single layer hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) on Ru(0001) substrate by using molecular beam epitaxy. We investigated the electronic structures of MoSe2 using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. Surprisingly, we found that the quasi-particle gap of the MoSe2 on hBN/Ru is about 0.25 eV smaller than those on graphene or graphite substrates. We attribute this result to the strong interaction between hBN/Ru which causes residual metallic screening from the substrate. The surface of MoSe2 exhibits Moir\'e pattern that replicates the Moir\'e pattern of hBN/Ru. In addition, the electronic structure and the work function of MoSe2 are modulated electrostatically with an amplitude of ~ 0.13 eV. Most interestingly, this electrostatic modulation is spatially in phase with the Moir\'e pattern of hBN on Ru(0001) whose surface also exhibits a work function modulation of the same amplitude.
  • The recently discovered (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe superconductor provides a new platform for exploiting the microscopic mechanisms of high-$T_c$ superconductivity in FeSe-derived systems. Using density functional theory calculations, we first show that substitution of Li by Fe not only significantly strengthens the attraction between the (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OH spacing layers and the FeSe superconducting layers along the \emph{c} axis, but also minimizes the lattice mismatch between the two in the \emph{ab} plane, both favorable for stabilizing the overall structure. Next we explore the electron injection into FeSe from the spacing layers, and unambiguously identify the Fe$_{0.2}$ components to be the dominant atomic origin of the dramatically enhanced interlayer charge transfer. We further reveal that the system strongly favors collinear antiferromagnetic ordering in the FeSe layers, but the spacing layers can be either antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic depending on the Fe$_{0.2}$ spatial distribution. Based on these understandings, we also predict (Li$_{0.8}$Co$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe to be structurally stable with even larger electron injection and potentially higher $T_c$.
  • It was recently proposed that the stress state of a material can also be altered via electron or hole doping, a concept termed electronic stress (ES), which is different from the traditional mechanical stress (MS) due to lattice contraction or expansion. Here we demonstrate the equivalence of ES and MS in structural stabilization, using In wires on Si(111) as a prototypical example. Our systematic density-functional theory calculations reveal that, first, for the same degrees of carrier doping into the In wires, the ES of the high-temperature metallic 4x1 structure is only slightly compressive, while that of the low-temperature insulating 8x2 structure is much larger and highly anisotropic. As a consequence, the intrinsic energy difference between the two phases is significantly reduced towards electronically phase-separated ground states. Our calculations further demonstrate quantitatively that such intriguing phase tunabilities can be achieved equivalently via lattice-contraction induced MS in the absence of charge doping. We also validate the equivalence through our detailed scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. The present findings have important implications in understanding the underlying driving forces involved in various phase transitions of simple and complex systems alike.
  • The two inequivalent valleys in graphene preclude the protection against inter-valley scattering offered by an odd-number of Dirac cones characteristic of Z2 topological insulator phases. Here we propose a way to engineer a chiral single-valley metallic phase with quadratic crossover in a honeycomb lattice through tailored \sqrt{3}N *\sqrt{3}N or 3N *3N superlattices. The possibility of tuning valley-polarization via pseudo-Zeeman field and the emergence of Dresselhaus-type valley-orbit coupling are proposed in adatom decorated graphene superlattices. Such valley manipulation mechanisms and metallic phase can also find applications in honeycomb photonic crystals.
  • Based on scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles theoretical studies, we characterize the precise atomic structure of a topological soliton in In chains grown on Si(111) surfaces. Variable-temperature measurements of the soliton population allow us to determine the soliton formation energy to be ~60 meV, smaller than one half of the band gap of ~200 meV. Once created, these solitons have very low mobility, even though the activation energy is only about 20 meV; the sluggish nature is attributed to the exceptionally low attempt frequency for soliton migration. We further demonstrate local electric field-enhanced soliton dynamics.
  • Graphene has attracted a lot of research interests due to its exotic properties and a wide spectrum of potential applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from gaseous hydrocarbon sources has shown great promises for large-scale graphene growth. However, high growth temperature, typically 1000{\deg}C, is required for such growth. Here we demonstrate a revised CVD route to grow graphene on Cu foils at low temperature, adopting solid and liquid hydrocarbon feedstocks. For solid PMMA and polystyrene precursors, centimeter-scale monolayer graphene films are synthesized at a growth temperature down to 400{\deg}C. When benzene is used as the hydrocarbon source, monolayer graphene flakes with excellent quality are achieved at a growth temperature as low as 300{\deg}C. The successful low-temperature growth can be qualitatively understood from the first principles calculations. Our work might pave a way to undemanding route for economical and convenient graphene growth.
  • The structure and electronic order at the cleaved (001) surfaces of the newly-discovered pnictide superconductors BaFe$_{2-x}$Co$_{x}$As$_{2}$ with x ranging from 0 to 0.32 are systematically investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. A $\sqrt{2}\times\sqrt{2}$ surface structure is revealed for all the compounds, and is identified to be Ba layer with half Ba atoms lifted-off by combination with theoretical simulation. A universal short-range charge order is observed at this $\sqrt{2}\times\sqrt{2}$ surface associated with an energy gap of about 30 meV for all the compounds.
  • The anomalous Hall effect is investigated experimentally and theoretically for ferromagnetic thin films of Mn$_5$Ge$_3$. We have separated the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the experimental anomalous Hall effect, and calculated the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity from the Berry curvature of the Bloch states using first-principles methods. The intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity depends linearly on the magnetization, which can be understood from the long wavelength fluctuations of the spin orientation at finite temperatures. The quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is remarkably good, not only near 0 K, but also at finite temperatures, up to about ~ 240 K (0.8 T$_C$})
  • Germanium-based alloys hold great promise for future spintronics applications, due to their potential for integration with conventional Si-based electronics. Mn5Ge3 exhibits strong ferromagnetism up to the Curie temperature Tc~295K. We use Point Contact Andreev Reflection (PCAR) spectroscopy to measure the spin polarization of Mn5Ge3 epilayers grown by solid phase epitaxy on Ge(111). In addition, we calculate the spin polarization of bulk Mn5Ge3 in the diffusive and ballistic regimes using density-functional theory. The measured spin polarization, Pc=43+/-5% is compared to our theoretical estimates, PDFT=10+/-5% and 35+/-5% in the ballistic and diffusive limits respectively.