• We propose a cryptosystem based on matrices over group rings and claim that it is secure against adaptive chosen ciphertext attack.
  • In this paper, we describe a brand new key exchange protocol based on a semidirect product of (semi)groups (more specifically, on extension of a (semi)group by automorphisms), and then focus on practical instances of this general idea. Our protocol can be based on any group, in particular on any non-commutative group. One of its special cases is the standard Diffie-Hellman protocol, which is based on a cyclic group. However, when our protocol is used with a non-commutative (semi)group, it acquires several useful features that make it compare favorably to the Diffie-Hellman protocol. Here we also suggest a particular non-commutative semigroup (of matrices) as the platform and show that security of the relevant protocol is based on a quite different assumption compared to that of the standard Diffie-Hellman protocol.
  • We offer a public key exchange protocol in the spirit of Diffie-Hellman, but we use (small) matrices over a group ring of a (small) symmetric group as the platform. This "nested structure" of the platform makes computation very efficient for legitimate parties. We discuss security of this scheme by addressing the Decision Diffie-Hellman (DDH) and Computational Diffie-Hellman (CDH) problems for our platform.
  • The objective of this work is to survey several digital signatures proposed in the last decade using non-commutative groups and rings and propose a digital signature using non-commutative groups and analyze its security.