• We measure the Planck cluster mass bias using dynamical mass measurements based on velocity dispersions of a subsample of 17 Planck-detected clusters. The velocity dispersions were calculated using redshifts determined from spectra obtained at Gemini observatory with the GMOS multi-object spectrograph. We correct our estimates for effects due to finite aperture, Eddington bias and correlated scatter between velocity dispersion and the Planck mass proxy. The result for the mass bias parameter, $(1-b)$, depends on the value of the galaxy velocity bias $b_v$ adopted from simulations: $(1-b)=(0.51\pm0.09) b_v^3$. Using a velocity bias of $b_v=1.08$ from Munari et al., we obtain $(1-b)=0.64\pm 0.11$, i.e, an error of 17% on the mass bias measurement with 17 clusters. This mass bias value is consistent with most previous weak lensing determinations. It lies within $1\sigma$ of the value needed to reconcile the Planck cluster counts with the Planck primary CMB constraints. We emphasize that uncertainty in the velocity bias severely hampers precision measurements of the mass bias using velocity dispersions. On the other hand, when we fix the Planck mass bias using the constraints from Penna-Lima et al., based on weak lensing measurements, we obtain a positive velocity bias $b_v \gtrsim 0.9$ at $3\sigma$.
  • We have carried out a systematic search with Spitzer Warm Mission and archival data for infrared emission from the hotspots in radio lobes that have been described by Hardcastle et al. (2004). These hotspots have been detected with both radio and X-ray observations, but an observation at an intermediate frequency in the infrared can be critical to distinguish between competing models for particle acceleration and radiation processes in these objects. Between the archival and warm mission data, we report detections of 18 hotspots; the archival data generally include detections at all four IRAC bands, the Warm Mission data only at 3.6 microns. Using a theoretical formalism adopted from Godfrey et al. (2009), we fit both archival and warm mission spectral energy distributions [SEDs] - including radio, X-ray, and optical data from Hardcastle as well as the Spitzer data - with a synchrotron self-Compton [SSC] model, in which the X-rays are produced by Compton scattering of the radio frequency photons by the energetic electrons which radiate them. With one exception, a SSC model requires that the magnetic field be less or much less than the equipartition value which minimizes total energy and has comparable amounts of energy in the magnetic field and in the energetic particles. This conclusion agrees with those of comparable recent studies of hotspots, and with the analysis presented by Hardcastle et al. (2004). We also show that the infrared data rule out the simplest synchrotron only models for the SEDs. We briefly discuss the implications of these results and of alternate interpretations of the data.
  • We analyse WMAP 7-year temperature data, jointly modeling the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Galactic foreground emission. We use the Commander code based on Gibbs sampling. Thus, from the WMAP7 data, we derive simultaneously the CMB and Galactic components on scales larger than 1deg with sensitivity improved relative to previous work. We conduct a detailed study of the low-frequency foreground with particular focus on the "microwave haze" emission around the Galactic center. We demonstrate improved performance in quantifying the diffuse galactic emission when Haslam 408MHz data are included together with WMAP7, and the spinning and thermal dust emission is modeled jointly. We also address the question of whether the hypothetical galactic haze can be explained by a spatial variation of the synchrotron spectral index. The excess of emission around the Galactic center appears stable with respect to variations of the foreground model that we study. Our results demonstrate that the new galactic foreground component - the microwave haze - is indeed present.
  • There is a vast menagerie of plausible candidates for the constituents of dark matter, both within and beyond extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. Each of these candidates may have scattering (and other) cross section properties that are consistent with the dark matter abundance, BBN, and the most scales in the matter power spectrum; but which may have vastly different behavior at sub-galactic "cutoff" scales, below which dark matter density fluctuations are smoothed out. The only way to quantitatively measure the power spectrum behavior at sub-galactic scales at distances beyond the local universe, and indeed over cosmic time, is through probes available in multiply imaged strong gravitational lenses. Gravitational potential perturbations by dark matter substructure encode information in the observed relative magnifications, positions, and time delays in a strong lens. Each of these is sensitive to a different moment of the substructure mass function and to different effective mass ranges of the substructure. The time delay perturbations, in particular, are proving to be largely immune to the degeneracies and systematic uncertainties that have impacted exploitation of strong lenses for such studies. There is great potential for a coordinated theoretical and observational effort to enable a sophisticated exploitation of strong gravitational lenses as direct probes of dark matter properties. This opportunity motivates this white paper, and drives the need for: a) strong support of the theoretical work necessary to understand all astrophysical consequences for different dark matter candidates; and b) tailored observational campaigns, and even a fully dedicated mission, to obtain the requisite data.
  • We report on the results of infrared spectroscopic mapping observations carried out in the nuclear region of Centaurus A (NGC5128). The 500 pc bipolar dust shell discovered by Quillen et al.(2006) is even more clearly seen in the 11.3 micron dust emission feature than previous broad band imaging. The pure rotational lines of molecular hydrogen other than the S(0) line are detected above the dusty disk and associated with the oval dust shell. The molecular hydrogen transitions indicate the presence of warm gas at temperatures 250--720K. The ratio of the dust emission features at 7.7 and 11.3 micron and the ratio of the [NeII](12.8) and 11.3 dust emission feature are lower in the 500 pc dust shell than in the star forming disk. The clearer shell morphology at 11.3 micron, warm molecular hydrogen emission in the shell, and variation in line ratios in the shell compared to those in the disk, confirm spectroscopically that this shell is a separate coherent entity and is unlikely to be a chance superposition of dust filaments. The physical conditions in the shell are most similar to Galactic supernova remnants where blast waves encounter molecular clouds. The lines requiring the highest level of ionization, [NeV] and [OIV], are detected 20--25 arcsec north-east and south-west of the nucleus and at position angles near the radio jet axis. Fine structure line ratios and limits from this region suggest that the medium is low density and illuminated by a hard radiation field at low ionization parameter. These higher S molecular hydrogen pure rotational transitions are also particularly bright in the same region as the [OIV] and [NeV] emission. This suggests that the gas associated with the dust shell has been excited near the jet axis and is part of an ionization cone.
  • Spitzer mid-infrared images of the dusty warped disk in the galaxy Centaurus A show a parallelogram-shaped structure. We successfully model the observed mid-infrared morphology by integrating the light from an emitting, thin, and warped disk, similar to that inferred from previous kinematic studies. The models with the best match to the morphology lack dust emission within the inner 0.1 to 0.8 kpc, suggesting that energetic processes near the nucleus have disturbed the inner molecular disk, creating a gap in the molecular gas distribution.
  • We present the first sky maps from the BEAST (Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope) experiment. BEAST consists of a 2.2 meter off axis Gregorian telescope fed by a cryogenic millimeter wavelength focal plane currently consisting of 6 Q band (40 GHz) and 2 Ka band (30 GHz) scalar feed horns feeding cryogenic HEMT amplifiers. Data were collected from two balloon-borne flights in 2000, followed by a lengthy ground observing campaign from the 3.8 Km altitude University of California White Mountain Research Station. This paper reports the initial results from the ground based observations. The instrument produced an annular map covering the sky from declinateion 33 to 42 degrees. The maps cover an area of 2470 square degrees with an effective resolution of 23 arcminutes FWHM at 40 GHz and 30 arcminutes at 30 GHz. The map RMS (smoothed to 30 arcminutes and excluding galactic foregrounds) is 54 +-5 microK at 40 GHz. Comparison with the instrument noise gives a cosmic signal RMS contribution of 28 +-3 microK. An estimate of the actual CMB sky signal requires taking into account the l-space filter function of our experiment and analysis techniques, carried out in a companion paper (O'Dwyer et al. 2003). In addition to the robust detection of CMB anisotropies, we find a strong correlation between small portions of our maps and features in recent H$\alpha$ maps (Finkbeiner, 2003). In this work we describe the data set and analysis techniques leading to the maps, including data selection, filtering, pointing reconstruction, mapmaking algorithms and systematic effects. A detailed description of the experiment appears in Childers et al. (2003).
  • We present a secure redshift of z=0.944\pm0.002 for the lensed object in the Einstein ring gravitational lens B0218+357 based on five broad emission lines, in good agreement with our preliminary value announced several years ago based solely on the detection of a single emission line.
  • The COBE satellite, and the DMR experiment in particular, was extraordinarily successful. However, the DMR results were announced about 7 years ago, during which time a great deal more has been learned about anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The CMB experiments currently being designed and built, including long-duration balloons, interferometers, and two space missions, promise to address several fundamental cosmological issues. We present our evaluation of what we already know, what we are beginning to learn now, and what the future may bring.
  • Fundamental information about the Universe is encoded in anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. To make full use of this information, an experiment must image the entire sky with the angular resolution, sensitivity, and spectral coverage necessary to reach the limits set by cosmic variance on angular scales >~10'. Recent progress in detector technology allows this to be achieved by a properly designed space mission that fits well within the scope of NASA's Medium-class Explorer program. An essential component of the mission design is an observing strategy that minimizes systematic effects due to instrumental offset drifts. The detector advances make possible a `spin chopping' approach that has significant technical and scientific advantages over the strategy used by COBE, which reconstructed an image of the sky via inversion of a large matrix of differential measurements. The advantages include increased angular resolution, increased sensitivity, and simplicity of instrumentation and spacecraft operations. For the parameters typical of experiments like the Primordial Structures Investigation (PSI) and the Far InfraRed Explorer (FIRE), we show that the spin-chopping strategy produces images of the sky and power spectra of CMB anisotropies that contain no significant systematic artifacts.