• Patch priors have became an important component of image restoration. A powerful approach in this category of restoration algorithms is the popular Expected Patch Log-likelihood (EPLL) algorithm. EPLL uses a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) prior learned on clean image patches as a way to regularize degraded patches. In this paper, we show that a generalized Gaussian mixture model (GGMM) captures the underlying distribution of patches better than a GMM. Even though GGMM is a powerful prior to combine with EPLL, the non-Gaussianity of its components presents major challenges to be applied to a computationally intensive process of image restoration. Specifically, each patch has to undergo a patch classification step and a shrinkage step. These two steps can be efficiently solved with a GMM prior but are computationally impractical when using a GGMM prior. In this paper, we provide approximations and computational recipes for fast evaluation of these two steps, so that EPLL can embed a GGMM prior on an image with more than tens of thousands of patches. Our main contribution is to analyze the accuracy of our approximations based on thorough theoretical analysis. Our evaluations indicate that the GGMM prior is consistently a better fit for modeling image patch distribution and performs better on average in image denoising task.
  • We address the question of estimating Kullback-Leibler losses rather than squared losses in recovery problems where the noise is distributed within the exponential family. Inspired by Stein unbiased risk estimator (SURE), we exhibit conditions under which these losses can be unbiasedly estimated or estimated with a controlled bias. Simulations on parameter selection problems in applications to image denoising and variable selection with Gamma and Poisson noises illustrate the interest of Kullback-Leibler losses and the proposed estimators.
  • Speckle reduction is a longstanding topic in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. Since most current and planned SAR imaging satellites operate in polarimetric, interferometric or tomographic modes, SAR images are multi-channel and speckle reduction techniques must jointly process all channels to recover polarimetric and interferometric information. The distinctive nature of SAR signal (complex-valued, corrupted by multiplicative fluctuations) calls for the development of specialized methods for speckle reduction. Image denoising is a very active topic in image processing with a wide variety of approaches and many denoising algorithms available, almost always designed for additive Gaussian noise suppression. This paper proposes a general scheme, called MuLoG (MUlti-channel LOgarithm with Gaussian denoising), to include such Gaussian denoisers within a multi-channel SAR speckle reduction technique. A new family of speckle reduction algorithms can thus be obtained, benefiting from the ongoing progress in Gaussian denoising, and offering several speckle reduction results often displaying method-specific artifacts that can be dismissed by comparison between results.
  • We focus on the maximum regularization parameter for anisotropic total-variation denoising. It corresponds to the minimum value of the regularization parameter above which the solution remains constant. While this value is well know for the Lasso, such a critical value has not been investigated in details for the total-variation. Though, it is of importance when tuning the regularization parameter as it allows fixing an upper-bound on the grid for which the optimal parameter is sought. We establish a closed form expression for the one-dimensional case, as well as an upper-bound for the two-dimensional case, that appears reasonably tight in practice. This problem is directly linked to the computation of the pseudo-inverse of the divergence, which can be quickly obtained by performing convolutions in the Fourier domain.
  • Bias in image restoration algorithms can hamper further analysis, typically when the intensities have a physical meaning of interest, e.g., in medical imaging. We propose to suppress a part of the bias -- the method bias -- while leaving unchanged the other unavoidable part -- the model bias. Our debiasing technique can be used for any locally affine estimator including \^a1 regularization, anisotropic total-variation and some nonlocal filters.
  • Algorithms to solve variational regularization of ill-posed inverse problems usually involve operators that depend on a collection of continuous parameters. When these operators enjoy some (local) regularity, these parameters can be selected using the so-called Stein Unbiased Risk Estimate (SURE). While this selection is usually performed by exhaustive search, we address in this work the problem of using the SURE to efficiently optimize for a collection of continuous parameters of the model. When considering non-smooth regularizers, such as the popular l1-norm corresponding to soft-thresholding mapping, the SURE is a discontinuous function of the parameters preventing the use of gradient descent optimization techniques. Instead, we focus on an approximation of the SURE based on finite differences as proposed in (Ramani et al., 2008). Under mild assumptions on the estimation mapping, we show that this approximation is a weakly differentiable function of the parameters and its weak gradient, coined the Stein Unbiased GrAdient estimator of the Risk (SUGAR), provides an asymptotically (with respect to the data dimension) unbiased estimate of the gradient of the risk. Moreover, in the particular case of soft-thresholding, it is proved to be also a consistent estimator. This gradient estimate can then be used as a basis to perform a quasi-Newton optimization. The computation of the SUGAR relies on the closed-form (weak) differentiation of the non-smooth function. We provide its expression for a large class of iterative methods including proximal splitting ones and apply our strategy to regularizations involving non-smooth convex structured penalties. Illustrations on various image restoration and matrix completion problems are given.
  • Photon-limited imaging arises when the number of photons collected by a sensor array is small relative to the number of detector elements. Photon limitations are an important concern for many applications such as spectral imaging, night vision, nuclear medicine, and astronomy. Typically a Poisson distribution is used to model these observations, and the inherent heteroscedasticity of the data combined with standard noise removal methods yields significant artifacts. This paper introduces a novel denoising algorithm for photon-limited images which combines elements of dictionary learning and sparse patch-based representations of images. The method employs both an adaptation of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for Poisson noise and recently developed sparsity-regularized convex optimization algorithms for photon-limited images. A comprehensive empirical evaluation of the proposed method helps characterize the performance of this approach relative to other state-of-the-art denoising methods. The results reveal that, despite its conceptual simplicity, Poisson PCA-based denoising appears to be highly competitive in very low light regimes.
  • Matching patches from a noisy image to atoms in a dictionary of patches is a key ingredient to many techniques in image processing and computer vision. By representing with a single atom all patches that are identical up to a radiometric transformation, dictionary size can be kept small, thereby retaining good computational efficiency. Identification of the atom in best match with a given noisy patch then requires a contrast-invariant criterion. In the light of detection theory, we propose a new criterion that ensures contrast invariance and robustness to noise. We discuss its theoretical grounding and assess its performance under Gaussian, gamma and Poisson noises.
  • In this work, we construct a risk estimator for hard thresholding which can be used as a basis to solve the difficult task of automatically selecting the threshold. As hard thresholding is not even continuous, Stein's lemma cannot be used to get an unbiased estimator of degrees of freedom, hence of the risk. We prove that under a mild condition, our estimator of the degrees of freedom, although biased, is consistent. Numerical evidence shows that our estimator outperforms another biased risk estimator.
  • In this paper, we develop an approach to recursively estimate the quadratic risk for matrix recovery problems regularized with spectral functions. Toward this end, in the spirit of the SURE theory, a key step is to compute the (weak) derivative and divergence of a solution with respect to the observations. As such a solution is not available in closed form, but rather through a proximal splitting algorithm, we propose to recursively compute the divergence from the sequence of iterates. A second challenge that we unlocked is the computation of the (weak) derivative of the proximity operator of a spectral function. To show the potential applicability of our approach, we exemplify it on a matrix completion problem to objectively and automatically select the regularization parameter.