• We study the birth of supermassive black holes from the direct collapse process and characterize the sites where these black hole seeds form. In the pre-reionization epoch, molecular hydrogen (H$_2$) is an efficient coolant, causing gas to fragment and form Population III stars, but Lyman-Werner radiation can suppress H$_2$ formation and allow gas to collapse directly into a massive black hole. The critical flux required to inhibit H$_2$ formation, $J_{\rm crit}$, is hotly debated, largely due to the uncertainties in the source radiation spectrum, H$_2$ self-shielding, and collisional dissociation rates. Here, we test the power of the direct collapse model in a self-consistent, time-dependant, non-uniform Lyman-Werner radiation field -- the first time such has been done in a cosmological volume -- using an updated version of the SPH+N-body tree code Gasoline with H$_2$ non-equilibrium abundance tracking, H$_2$ cooling, and a modern SPH implementation. We vary $J_{\rm crit} $ from $30$ to $10^3$ in units of $J_{21}$ to study how this parameter impacts the number of seed black holes and the type of galaxies which host them. We focus on black hole formation as a function of environment, halo mass, metallicity, and proximity of the Lyman-Werner source. Massive black hole seeds form more abundantly with lower $J_{\rm crit}$ thresholds, but regardless of $J_{\rm crit}$, these seeds typically form in halos that have recently begun star formation. Our results do not confirm the proposed atomic cooling halo pair scenario; rather black hole seeds predominantly form in low-metallicity pockets of halos which already host star formation.
  • We analyze age-velocity dispersion relations (AVRs) from kinematics of individual stars in eight Local Group galaxies ranging in mass from Carina ($M_{*} \sim 10^{6}$) to M31 ($M_{*} \sim 10^{11}$). Observationally the $\sigma$ vs. stellar age trends can be interpreted as dynamical heating of the stars by GMCs, bars/spiral arms, or merging subhalos; alternatively the stars could have simply been born out of a more turbulent ISM at high redshift and retain that larger velocity dispersion till present day - consistent with recent IFU studies. To ascertain the dominant mechanism and better understand the impact of instabilities and feedback, we develop models based on observed SFHs of these Local Group galaxies in order to create an evolutionary formalism which describes the ISM velocity dispersion due to a galaxy's evolving gas fraction. These empirical models relax the common assumption that the stars are born from gas which has constant velocity dispersion at all redshifts. Using only the observed SFHs as input, the ISM velocity dispersion and a mid-plane scattering model fits the observed AVRs of low mass galaxies without fine tuning. Higher mass galaxies above $M_{vir} > 10^{11}$ need a larger contribution from latent dynamical heating processes (for example minor mergers), in excess of the ISM model. Using the SFHs we also find that supernovae feedback does not appear to be a dominant driver of the gas velocity dispersion compared to gravitational instabilities - at least for dispersions $\sigma \gtrsim 25$ km/s. Together our results point to stars being born with a velocity dispersion close to that of the gas at the time of their formation, with latent dynamical heating operating with a galaxy mass-dependent efficiency. These semi-empirical relations may help constrain the efficiency of feedback and its impact on the physics of disk settling in galaxy formation simulations.
  • Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation can produce present-day galaxies with a large range of assembly and star formation histories. A detailed study of the metallicity evolution and star formation history of such simulations can assist in predicting LIGO-detectable compact object binary mergers. Recent simulations of compact binary evolution suggest the compact object merger rate depends sensitively on the progenitor's metallicity. Rare low-metallicity star formation during galaxy assembly can produce more detected compact binaries than typical star formation. Using detailed simulations of galaxy and chemical evolution, we determine how sensitively the compact binary populations of galaxies with similar present-day appearance depend on the details of their assembly. We also demonstrate by concrete example the extent to which dwarf galaxies overabundantly produce compact binary mergers, particularly binary black holes, relative to more massive galaxies. We discuss the implications for transient multimessenger astronomy with compact binary sources.
  • We use high resolution Hydro$+$N-Body cosmological simulations to compare the assembly and evolution of a small field dwarf (stellar mass ~ 10$^{6-7}$ M$\odot$, total mass 10$^{10}$ M$\odot$ in $\Lambda$ dominated CDM and 2keV WDM cosmologies. We find that star formation (SF) in the WDM model is reduced and delayed by 1-2 Gyr relative to the CDM model, independently of the details of SF and feedback. Independent of the DM model, but proportionally to the SF efficiency, gas outflows lower the central mass density through `dynamical heating', such that all realizations have circular velocities $<$ 20kms at 500$~$pc, in agreement with local kinematic constraints. As a result of dynamical heating, older stars are less centrally concentrated than younger stars, similar to stellar population gradients observed in nearby dwarf galaxies. Introducing an important diagnostic of SF and feedback models, we translate our simulations into artificial color-magnitude diagrams and star formation histories in order to directly compare to available observations. The simulated galaxies formed most of their stars in many $\sim$10 Myr long bursts. The CDM galaxy has a global SFH, HI abundance and Fe/H and alpha-elements distribution well matched to current observations of dwarf galaxies. These results highlight the importance of directly including `baryon physics' in simulations when 1) comparing predictions of galaxy formation models with the kinematics and number density of local dwarf galaxies and 2) differentiating between CDM and non-standard models with different DM or power spectra.
  • The relation of central black hole mass and stellar spheroid velocity dispersion (the M-$\sigma$ relation) is one of the best-known and tightest correlations linking black holes and their host galaxies. There has been much scrutiny concerning the difficulty of obtaining accurate black hole measurements, and rightly so; however, it has been taken for granted that measurements of velocity dispersion are essentially straightforward. We examine five disk galaxies from cosmological SPH simulations and find that line-of-sight effects due to galaxy orientation can affect the measured $\sigma$ by 30%, and consequently black hole mass predictions by up to 1.0 dex. Face-on orientations correspond to systematically lower velocity dispersion measurements, while more edge-on orientations give higher velocity dispersions, due to contamination by disk stars when measuring line of sight quantities. We caution observers that the uncertainty of velocity dispersion measurements is at least 20 km/s, and can be much larger for moderate inclinations. This effect may account for some of the scatter in the locally measured M-$\sigma$ relation, particularly at the low-mass end. We provide a method for correcting observed $\sigma_{\rm los}$ values for inclination effects based on observable quantities.
  • We compare the central mass distribution of galaxies simulated with three different models of the interstellar medium (ISM) with increasing complexity: primordial (H+He) cooling down to 10^4K, additional cooling via metal lines and to lower temperatures, and molecular hydrogen (H_2) with shielding of atomic and molecular hydrogen, in addition to metal line cooling. In order to analyze the effect of these models, we follow the evolution of four field galaxies with V_peak < 120 km/s to a redshift of zero using high-resolution Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulations in a fully cosmological LCDM context. The spiral galaxies produced in simulations with either primordial cooling or H_2 physics have realistic, rising rotation curves. In contrast, the simulations with metal line cooling and otherwise similar feedback and star formation produced galaxies with the peaked rotation curves typical of most previous LCDM simulations of spiral galaxies. The less-massive bulges and non-peaked rotation curves in the galaxies simulated with primordial cooling or H_2 are linked to changes in the angular momentum distribution of the baryons. These galaxies had smaller amounts of low-angular momentum baryons because of increased gas loss from stellar feedback. When there is only primordial cooling, the star forming gas is hotter and the feedback-heated gas cools more slowly than when metal line cooling is included and so requires less energy to be expelled. When H_2 is included, the accompanying shielding produces large amounts of clumpy, cold gas where H_2 forms. Star formation in clumpy gas results in more concentrated supernova feedback and greater efficiency of mass loss. The higher feedback efficiency causes a decrease of low-angular momentum material. (abridged)
  • We examine the pressure of the star-forming interstellar medium (ISM) of Milky-Way sized disk galaxies using fully cosmological SPH+N-body, high resolution simulations. These simulations include explicit treatment of metal-line cooling in addition to dust and self-shielding, $\mathrm{H_{2}}$ based star formation. The 4 simulated halos have masses ranging from a few times $10^{10}$ to nearly $10^{12}$ solar masses. Using a kinematic decomposition of these galaxies into present-day bulge and disk components, we find that the typical pressure of the star-forming ISM in the present-day bulge is higher than that in the present-day disk by an order of magnitude. We also find that pressure of the star-forming ISM at high redshift is on average, higher than ISM pressures at low redshift. This explains the why the bulge forms at higher pressures: the disk assembles at lower redshift, when the ISM is lower pressure and the bulge forms at high redshift, when the ISM is at higher pressure. If ISM pressure and IMF variation are tied together as suggested in studies like \cite{Conroy2012}, these results could indicate a time-dependent IMF in Milky-Way like systems, as well as a different IMF in the bulge and the disk.
  • Using high resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of Milky Way-massed disk galaxies, we demonstrate that supernovae feedback and tidal stripping lower the central masses of bright (-15 < M_V < -8) satellite galaxies. These simulations resolve high density regions, comparable to giant molecular clouds, where stars form. This resolution allows us to adopt a prescription for H_2 formation and destruction that ties star formation to the presence of shielded, molecular gas. Before infall, supernova feedback from the clumpy, bursty star formation captured by this physically motivated model leads to reduced dark matter (DM) densities and shallower inner density profiles in the massive satellite progenitors (Mvir > 10^9 Msun, Mstar > 10^7 Msun) compared to DM-only simulations. The progenitors of the lower mass satellites are unable to maintain bursty star formation histories, due to both heating at reionization and gas loss from initial star forming events, preserving the steep inner density profile predicted by DM-only simulations. After infall, tidal stripping acts to further reduce the central densities of the luminous satellites, particularly those that enter with cored dark matter halos, increasing the discrepancy in the central masses predicted by baryon+DM and DM-only simulations. We show that DM-only simulations, which neglect the baryonic effects described in this work, produce denser satellites with larger central velocities. We provide a simple correction to the central DM mass predicted for satellites by DM-only simulations. We conclude that DM-only simulations should be used with great caution when interpreting kinematic observations of the Milky Way's dwarf satellites.
  • Motivated by the observed connection between molecular hydrogen (H2) and star formation, we present a method for tracking the non-equilibrium abundance and cooling processes of H2 and H2-based star formation in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulations. The local abundances of H2 are calculated by integrating over the hydrogen chemical network. This calculation includes the gas-phase and dust grain formation of H2, shielding of HI and H2, and photodissociation of H2 by Lyman-Werner radiation from nearby stellar populations. Because this model does not assume equilibrium abundances, it is particularly well suited for simulations that model low-metallicity environments, such as dwarf galaxies and the early Universe. We further introduce an explicit link between star formation and local H2 abundance. This link limits star formation to "star-forming regions," represented by areas with abundant H2. With this implementation, we determine the effect of H2 on star formation in a cosmological simulation of a dwarf galaxy. This simulation is the first cosmological simulation with non-equilibrium H2 abundances to be integrated to a redshift of zero or to include efficient SN feedback. We find that our simulations are consistent with the observed Tully-Fisher, global Kennicutt-Schmidt, and resolved Kennicutt-Schmidt relations. We find that the inclusion of shielding of both the atomic and molecular hydrogen and, to a lesser extent, the additional cooling from H2 at temperatures between 200 and 5000 K increases the amount of cold gas in the galaxies. The changes to the ISM result in an increased amount of cold, dense gas in the disk of the galaxy and the formation of a clumpier interstellar media (ISM). The explicit link between star formation and H2 and the clumpier ISM results in a bluer galaxy with a greater spatial distribution of star formation at a redshift of zero. (abridged)
  • We examine the effect of mass and force resolution on a specific star formation (SF) recipe using a set of N-body/Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies. Our simulations span halo masses from 10^9 to 10^13 solar masses, more than four orders of magnitude in mass resolution, and two orders of magnitude in the gravitational softening length, epsilon, representing the force resolution. We examine the total global star formation rate, the star formation history, and the quantity of stellar feedback and compare the disk structure of the galaxies. Based on our analysis, we recommend using at least 10^4 particles each for the dark matter and gas component and a force resolution of epsilon approximately equal to 10^-3 R_vir when studying global SF and feedback. When the spatial distribution of stars is important, the number of gas and dark matter particles must be increased to at least 10^5 of each. Low mass resolution simulations with fixed softening lengths show particularly weak stellar disks due to two-body heating. While decreasing spatial resolution in low mass resolution simulations limits two-body effects, density and potential gradients cannot be sustained. Regardless of the softening, low-mass resolution simulations contain fewer high density regions where SF may occur. Galaxies of approximately 10^10 solar masses display unique sensitivity to both mass and force resolution. This mass of galaxy has a shallow potential and is on the verge of forming a disk. The combination of these factors give this galaxy the potential for strong gas outflows driven by supernova feedback and make it particularly sensitive to any changes to the simulation parameters.
  • The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D<4 Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small & large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of ~10^4 in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consists of images taken with ACS on HST, supplemented with archival data and new WFPC2 imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m_F475W=28.0 mag, m_F606W=27.3 mag, and m_F814W=27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both the ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.
  • Promoting racial and ethnic diversity is critically important to the future success and growth of the field of astronomy. The raw ability, drive and interest required to excel in the field is distributed without regard to race, gender, or socioeconomic background. By not actively promoting diversity in our field we risk losing talented people to other professions (or losing them entirely), which means that there will be astronomical discoveries that simply won't get made. There is demonstrated evidence that STEM fields benefit from diverse perspectives on problems that require more complex thought processes. This is especially relevant to a field like astronomy where more and more work is being done collaboratively. The lack of notable growth in African American, Hispanic, and Native American representation in astronomy indicates that the 'pipeline' for these individuals is systemically leaky at critical junctures. Substantially more effort must be directed toward improving the educational and career development of minorities to insure that these potential colleagues are supported through the process. However, simply recognizing that the pipeline is faulty is woefully inadequate. There must be very specific, targeted solutions to help improve the situation. With this in mind, we offer two position papers addressing specific areas of improvement that we identify as (a) essential for any foreseeable progress in the field, and (b) attainable in the 2010-2020 decade. These position papers focus primarily on African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans. Although we do not directly address issues of Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and other groups, many of the recommendations made here can be adapted to address issues faced by these groups as well.
  • If the ethnic makeup of the astronomy profession is to achieve parity with the general population within one generation (~30 years), the number of underrepresented minorities earning graduate degrees in astronomy and astrophysics must increase in the coming decade by a factor of 5 to 10. To accomplish this, the profession must develop and invest in mechanisms to more effectively move individuals across critical educational junctures to the PhD and beyond. Early and continuous research engagement starting in the undergraduate years is critical to this vision, in which the federally funded research internship programs (e.g. NSF REU, NASA GSRP) and national centers/observatories play a vital role. Regionally based partnerships with minority-serving institutions (MSIs) are crucial for tapping extant pools of minority talent, as are post-baccalaurate and/or masters degree "bridging" programs that provide critical stepping stones to the PhD. Because of the strong undergraduate physics, engineering, and computer science backgrounds of many students from MSIs, we suggest that instrument development and large scale computing/data-mining are particularly promising avenues for engagement in the coming decade.
  • In order to attract, recruit and retain underrepresented minority students to pursue Astronomy and related fields, we must ensure that there continues to be a well qualified pool of graduate and undergraduate students from which to recruit. This required pool of people are today's elementary, middle and high school students. The Astronomy community must be proactive in demonstrating the importance of pursing scientific study and careers to these students and their parents. Only by actively engaging these communities can U.S Astronomy hope to increase the numbers of minority PhDs and continue to be a leader in Astronomical discovery and knowledge.