• We compare the magnetic field orientation for the young giant molecular cloud Vela\,C inferred from 500-$\mu$m~polarization maps made with the BLASTPol balloon-borne polarimeter to the orientation of structures in the integrated line emission maps from Mopra observations. Averaging over the entire cloud we find that elongated structures in integrated line-intensity, or zeroth-moment maps, for low density tracers such as $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO~$J$\,$\rightarrow$\,1\,--\,0 are statistically more likely to align parallel to the magnetic field, while intermediate or high density tracers show (on average) a tendency for alignment perpendicular to the magnetic field. This observation agrees with previous studies of the change in relative orientation with column density in Vela\,C, and supports a model where the magnetic field is strong enough to have influenced the formation of dense gas structures within Vela\,C. The transition from parallel to no preferred/perpendicular orientation appears to happen between the densities traced by $^{13}$CO and by C$^{18}$O~$J$\,$\rightarrow$\,1\,--\,0. Using RADEX radiative transfer models to estimate the characteristic number density traced by each molecular line we find that the transition occurs at a molecular hydrogen number density of approximately\,$10^3$\,cm$^{-3}$. We also see that the Centre-Ridge (the highest column density and most active star-forming region within Vela\,C) appears to have a transition at a lower number density, suggesting that this may depend on the evolutionary state of the cloud.
  • The BLASTPol observations of Vela C have provided the most detailed characterization of the polarization fraction $p$ and dispersion in polarization angles $S$ for a molecular cloud. We compare the observed distributions of $p$ and $S$ with those obtained in synthetic observations of simulations of molecular clouds, assuming homogeneous grain alignment. We find that the orientation of the mean magnetic field relative to the observer has a significant effect on the $p$ and $S$ distributions. These distributions for Vela C are most consistent with synthetic observations where the mean magnetic field is close to the line-of-sight. Our results point to apparent magnetic disorder in the Vela C molecular cloud, although it can be due to either an inclination effect (i.e., observing close to the mean field direction) or significant field tangling from strong turbulence/low magnetization. The joint correlations of $p$ with column density and of $S$ with column density for the synthetic observations generally agree poorly with the Vela C joint correlations, suggesting that understanding these correlations require a more sophisticated treatment of grain alignment physics.
  • The vacuum, static, and spherically symmetric solutions in the mimetic Born-Infeld gravity are studied. The mimetic Born-Infeld gravity is a reformulation of the Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) model under the mimetic approach. Due to the mimetic field, the theory contains non-trivial vacuum solutions different from those in Einstein gravity. We find that with the existence of the mimetic field, the spacelike singularity inside a Schwarzschild black hole could be altered to a lightlike singularity, even though the curvature invariants still diverge at the singularity. Furthermore, in this case, the maximal proper time for a timelike radially-infalling observer to reach the singularity is found to be infinite.
  • The Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) model is reformulated within the mimetic approach. In the presence of a mimetic field, the model contains non-trivial vacuum solutions which could be free of spacetime singularity because of the Born-Infeld nature of the theory. We study a realistic primordial vacuum universe and prove the existence of regular solutions, such as primordial inflationary solutions of de Sitter type or bouncing solutions. Besides, the linear instabilities present in the EiBI model are found to be avoidable for some interesting bouncing solutions in which the physical metric as well as the auxiliary metric are regular at the background level.
  • By far cosmology is one of the most exciting subject to study, even more so with the current bulk of observations we have at hand. These observations might indicate different kinds of doomsdays, if dark energy follows certain patterns. Two of these doomsdays are the Little Rip (LR) and Little Sibling of the Big Rip (LSBR). In this work, aside from proving the unavoidability of the LR and LSBR in the Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) scenario, we carry out a quantum analysis of the EiBI theory with a matter field, which, from a classical point of view would inevitably lead to a universe that ends with either LR or LSBR. Based on a modified Wheeler-DeWitt equation, we demonstrate that such fatal endings seems to be avoidable.
  • Thin, magnetically aligned striations of relatively moderate contrast with the background are commonly observed in both atomic and molecular clouds. They are also prominent in MHD simulations with turbulent converging shocks. The simulated striations develop within a dense, stagnated sheet in the mid plane of the post-shock region where magnetically-induced converging flows collide. We show analytically that the secondary flows are an inevitable consequence of the jump conditions of oblique MHD shocks. They produce the stagnated, sheet-like sub-layer through a secondary shock when, roughly speaking, the Alfv\'enic speed in the primary converging flows is supersonic, a condition that is relatively easy to satisfy in interstellar clouds. The dense sub-layer is naturally threaded by a strong magnetic field that lies close to the plane of the sub-layer. The substantial magnetic field makes the sheet highly anisotropic, which is the key to the striation formation. Specifically, perturbations of the primary inflow that vary spatially perpendicular to the magnetic field can easily roll up the sheet around the field lines without bending them, creating corrugations that appear as magnetically-aligned striations in column density maps. On the other hand, perturbations that vary spatially along the field lines curve the sub-layer and alter its orientation relative to the magnetic field locally, seeding special locations that become slanted overdense filaments and prestellar cores through enhanced mass accumulation along field lines. In our scenario, the dense sub-layer unique to magnetized oblique shocks is the birthplace for both magnetically-aligned diffuse striations and massive star-forming structures.
  • In this work, we investigate $O(4)$-symmetric instantons within the Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld gravity theory (EiBI). We discuss the regular Hawking-Moss instanton and find that the tunneling rate reduces to the General Relativity (GR) value, even though the action value is different by a constant. We give a thorough analysis of the singular Vilenkin instanton and the Hawking-Turok instanton with a quadratic scalar field potential in the EiBI theory. In both cases, we find that the singularity can be avoided in the sense that the physical metric, its scalar curvature and the scalar field are regular under some parameter restrictions, but there is a curvature singularity of the auxiliary metric compatible with the connection. We find that the on-shell action is finite and the probability does not reduce to its GR value. We also find that the Vilenkin instanton in the EiBI theory would still cause the instability of the Minkowski space, similar to that in GR, and this is observationally inconsistent. This result suggests that the singularity of the auxiliary metric may be problematic at the quantum level and that these instantons should be excluded from the path integral.
  • The quantum effects close to the classical big rip singularity within the Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld theory (EiBI) are investigated through quantum geometrodynamics. It is the first time that this approach is applied to a modified theory constructed upon Palatini formalism. The Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) equation is obtained and solved based on an alternative action proposed in Ref.[1], under two different factor ordering choices. This action is dynamically equivalent to the original EiBI action while it is free of square root of the spacetime curvature. We consider a homogeneous, isotropic and spatially flat universe, which is assumed to be dominated by a phantom perfect fluid whose equation of state is a constant. We obtain exact solutions of the WDW equation based on some specific conditions. In more general cases, we propose a qualitative argument with the help of a Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation to get further solutions. Besides, we also construct an effective WDW equation by simply promoting the classical Friedmann equations. We find that for all the approaches considered, the DeWitt condition hinting singularity avoidance is satisfied. Therefore the big rip singularity can be avoided through the quantum approach within the EiBI theory.
  • Diffuse striations in molecular clouds are preferentially aligned with local magnetic fields whereas dense filaments tend to be perpendicular to them. When and why this transition occurs remain uncertain. To explore the physics behind this transition, we compute the histogram of relative orientation (HRO) between the density gradient and the magnetic field in 3D MHD simulations of prestellar core formation in shock-compressed regions within GMCs. We find that, in the magnetically-dominated (sub-Alfv\'enic) post-shock region, the gas structure is preferentially aligned with the local magnetic field. For overdense sub-regions with super-Alfv\'enic gas, their elongation becomes preferentially perpendicular to the local magnetic field instead. The transition occurs when self-gravitating gas gains enough kinetic energy from the gravitational acceleration to overcome the magnetic support against the cross-field contraction, which results in a power-law increase of the field strength with density. Similar results can be drawn from HROs in projected 2D maps with integrated column densities and synthetic polarized dust emission. We quantitatively analyze our simulated polarization properties, and interpret the reduced polarization fraction at high column densities as the result of increased distortion of magnetic field directions in trans- or super-Alfv\'enic gas. Furthermore, we introduce measures of the inclination and tangledness of the magnetic field along the line of sight as the controlling factors of the polarization fraction. Observations of the polarization fraction and angle dispersion can therefore be utilized in studying local magnetic field morphology in star-forming regions.
  • The Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity, which is formulated within the Palatini formalism, is characterized by its ability to cure the big bang singularity in the very beginning of the Universe. We further analyze the EiBI phantom model, and investigate the possible avoidance or alleviation of other dark energy related singularities. We find that except for the big rip singularity and little rip event, most of the cosmological singularities of interest can be partially alleviated in this model. Furthermore, we generalize the EiBI theory by adding a pure trace term to the determinant of the action. This amendment is the most general rank-two tensor composed of up to first order of the Riemann curvature. We find that this model allows the occurrence of primitive bounces and some smoother singularities than that of big bang. Most interestingly, for certain parameter space, the big bang singularity can be followed naturally by an inflationary stage in a radiation dominated universe.
  • In this paper, a modified Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) theory with a pure trace term $g_{\mu\nu}R$ being added to the determinantal action is analysed from a cosmological point of view. It corresponds to the most general action constructed from a rank two tensor that contains up to first order terms in curvature. This term can equally be seen as a conformal factor multiplying the metric $g_{\mu\nu}$. This very interesting type of amendment has not been considered within the Palatini formalism despite the large amount of works on the Born-Infeld-inspired theory of gravity. This model can provide smooth bouncing solutions which were not allowed in the EiBI model for the same EiBI coupling. Most interestingly, for a radiation filled universe there are some regions of the parameter space that can naturally lead to a de Sitter inflationary stage without the need of any exotic matter field. Finally, in this model we discover a new type of cosmic "quasi-sudden" singularity, where the cosmic time derivative of the Hubble rate becomes very large but finite at a finite cosmic time.
  • In giant molecular clouds (GMCs), shocks driven by converging turbulent flows create high-density, strongly-magnetized regions that are locally sheetlike. In previous work, we showed that within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form by gathering material along the magnetic field lines. Here, we extend the parameter space of our three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations. We confirm the anisotropic core formation model we previously proposed, and quantify the dependence of median core properties on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that bound core properties are set by the total dynamic pressure (dominated by large-scale turbulence) and thermal sound speed c_s in GMCs, independent of magnetic field strength. For models with Mach number between 5 and 20, the median core masses and radii are comparable to the critical Bonnor-Ebert mass and radius defined using the dynamic pressure for P_ext. Our results correspond to M_core = 1.2 c_s^4/sqrt(G^3 rho_0 v_0^2) and R_core = 0.34 c_s^2/sqrt(G rho_0 v_0^2) for rho_0 and v_0 the large-scale mean density and velocity. For our parameter range, the median M_core ~ 0.1-1 M_sun, but a very high pressure cloud could have lower characteristic core mass. We find cores and filaments form simultaneously, and filament column densities are a factor ~2 greater than the surrounding cloud when cores first collapse. We also show that cores identified in our simulations have physical properties comparable to those observed in the Perseus cloud. Superthermal cores in our models are generally also magnetically supercritical, suggesting that the same may be true in observed clouds.
  • The Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld scenario (EiBI) can prevent the Big Bang singularity for a matter content whose equation of state is constant and positive. In a recent paper we showed that, on the contrary, it is impossible to smooth a big rip in the EiBI setup. In fact the situations are still different for other singularities. In this paper we show that a big freeze singularity in general relativity (GR) can in some cases be smoothed to a sudden or a type IV singularity under the EiBI scenario. Similarly, a sudden or a type IV singularity in GR can be replaced in some regions of the parameter space by a type IV singularity or a loitering behaviour, respectively, in the EiBI framework. Furthermore, we find that the auxiliary metric related to the physical connection usually has a smoother behaviour than that based on the physical metric. In addition, we show that bound structures close to a big rip or a little rip will be destroyed before the advent of the singularity and will remain bound close to a sudden, big freeze or type IV singularity. We then constrain the model following a cosmographic approach, which is well-known to be model-independent, for a given Friedmann-Lema\^itre-Robertson-Walker geometry. It turns out that among the various past or present singularities, the cosmographic analysis can pick up the physical region that determines the occurrence of a type IV singularity or a loitering effect in the past. Moreover, to determine which of the future singularities or doomsdays is more probable, observational constraints on higher order cosmographic parameters is required.
  • The Born-Infeld determinantal gravity has been recently proposed as a way to smooth the Big Bang singularity. This theory is formulated on the Weitzenbock space-time and the teleparallel representation is used instead of the standard Riemannian representation. We find that although this theory is shown to be singularity-free for certain region of the parameter space in which the divergence of the Hubble rate at the high energy regime is substituted by a de-Sitter stage or a bounce in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe, cosmological singularities such as Big Rip, Big Bang, Big Freeze, and Sudden singularities can emerge in other regions of the configuration space of the theory. We also show that all these singular events exist even though the Universe is filled with a perfect fluid with a constant equation of state.
  • We present observations of N2H+(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HCN(1-0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 square arcminutes of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of 7 arcsecs. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N2H+(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of 0.2 pc and widths of 0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.
  • We investigate the roles of magnetic fields and ambipolar diffusion during prestellar core formation in turbulent giant molecular clouds (GMCs), using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Our simulations focus on the shocked layer produced by a converging flow within a GMC, and survey varying ionization and angle between the upstream flow and magnetic field. We also include ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and hydrodynamic models. From our simulations, we identify hundreds of self-gravitating cores that form within 1 Myr, with masses M ~ 0.04 - 2.5 solar-mass and sizes L ~ 0.015 - 0.07 pc, consistent with observations of the peak of the core mass function (CMF). Median values are M = 0.47 solar-mass and L = 0.03 pc. Core masses and sizes do not depend on either the ionization or upstream magnetic field direction. In contrast, the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio does increase with lower ionization, from twice to four times the critical value. The higher mass-to-flux ratio for low ionization is the result of enhanced transient ambipolar diffusion when the shocked layer first forms. However, ambipolar diffusion is not necessary to form low-mass supercritical cores. For ideal MHD, we find similar masses to other cases. These masses are 1 - 2 orders of magnitude lower than the value that defines a magnetically supercritical sphere under post-shock ambient conditions. This discrepancy is the result of anisotropic contraction along field lines, which is clearly evident in both ideal MHD and diffusive simulations. We interpret our numerical findings using a simple scaling argument which suggests that gravitationally critical core masses will depend on the sound speed and mean turbulent pressure in a cloud, regardless of magnetic effects.
  • The Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) theory has been recently resurrected. Such a theory is characterized by being equivalent to Einstein theory in vacuum but differing from it in the presence of matter. One of the virtues of the theory is to avoid the Big Bang singularity for a radiation filled universe. In this paper, we analyze singularity avoidance in this kind of model. More precisely, we analyze the behavior of a homogeneous and isotropic universe filled with phantom energy in addition to the dark and baryonic matter. Unlike the Big Bang singularity that can be avoided in this kind of model through a bounce or a loitering effect on the physical metric, we find that the Big Rip singularity is unavoidable in the EiBI phantom model even though it can be postponed towards a slightly further future cosmic time as compared with the same singularity in other models based on the standard general relativity and with the same matter content described above.
  • We analyze the properties of steady and time-dependent C shocks under conditions prevailing in giant molecular clouds. For steady C shocks, we show that ionization equilibrium holds and use numerical integrations to obtain the shock thickness mediated by ambipolar diffusion as a function of density, inflow velocity, magnetic field, and ionization fraction in the cloud. Our formula also agrees with an analytic estimate based on ion-neutral momentum exchange. Using time-dependent numerical simulations, we show that C shocks have a transient stage when the neutrals are compressed much more strongly than the magnetic field. The transient stage has a duration set by the neutral-ion collision time, t_AD ~ L_shock/v_drift ~ 0.1 - 1 Myr. This transient creates a strong enhancement in the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio. Under favorable conditions, supercritical prestellar cores may form and collapse promptly as a result of magnetic flux loss during the transient stage of C shocks.