• The variations of the 3-D coronal magnetic fields associated with the X3.4-class flare of active region 10930 are studied in this paper. The coronal magnetic field data are reconstructed from the photospheric vector magnetograms obtained by the Hinode satellite and using the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation method developed in our previous work (He et al., 2011). The 3-D force-free factor $\alpha$, 3-D current density, and 3-D magnetic energy density are employed to analyze the coronal data. The distributions of $\alpha$ and current density reveal a prominent magnetic connectivity with strong negative $\alpha$ values and strong current density before the flare. This magnetic connectivity extends along the main polarity inversion line and is found to be totally broken after the flare. The distribution variation of magnetic energy density reveals the redistribution of magnetic energy before and after the flare. In the lower space of the modeling volume the increase of magnetic energy dominates, and in the higher space the decrease of energy dominates. The comparison with the flare onset imaging observation exhibits that the breaking site of the magnetic connectivity and site with the highest values of energy density increase coincide with the location of flare initial eruption. We conclude that a cramped positive $\alpha$ region appearing in the photosphere causes the breaking of the magnetic connectivity. A scenario for flare initial eruption is proposed in which the Lorentz force acting on the isolated electric current at the magnetic connectivity breaking site lifts the associated plasmas and causes the initial ejection.
  • Magnetic reconnection is a rapid energy release process that is believed to be responsible for flares on the Sun and stars. Nevertheless, such flare-related reconnection is mostly detected to occur in the corona, while there have been few studies concerning the reconnection in the chromosphere or photosphere. Here we present both spectroscopic and imaging observations of magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere leading to a microflare. During the flare peak time, chromospheric line profiles show significant blueshifted/redshifted components on the two sides of the flaring site, corresponding to upflows and downflows with velocities of $\pm$(70--80) km s$^{-1}$, comparable with the local Alfv\'{e}n speed as expected by the reconnection in the chromosphere. The three-dimensional nonlinear force-free field configuration further discloses twisted field lines (a flux rope) at a low altitude, cospatial with the dark threads in He I 10830 \r{A} images. The instability of the flux rope may initiate the flare-related reconnection. These observations provide clear evidence of magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere and show the similar mechanisms of a microflare to those of major flares.
  • The problem of scheduling under resource constraints is widely applicable. One prominent example is power management, in which we have a limited continuous supply of power but must schedule a number of power-consuming tasks. Such problems feature tightly coupled continuous resource constraints and continuous temporal constraints. We address such problems by introducing the Time Resource Network (TRN), an encoding for resource-constrained scheduling problems. The definition allows temporal specifications using a general family of representations derived from the Simple Temporal network, including the Simple Temporal Network with Uncertainty, and the probabilistic Simple Temporal Network (Fang et al. (2014)). We propose two algorithms for determining the consistency of a TRN: one based on Mixed Integer Programing and the other one based on Constraint Programming, which we evaluate on scheduling problems with Simple Temporal Constraints and Probabilistic Temporal Constraints.
  • We present a study of the waiting time distributions (WTDs) of solar energetic particle (SEP) events observed with the spacecraft $WIND$ and $GOES$. Both the WTDs of solar electron events (SEEs) and solar proton events (SPEs) display a power-law tail $\sim \Delta t^{-\gamma}$. The SEEs display a broken power-law WTD. The power-law index is $\gamma_{1} =$ 0.99 for the short waiting times ($<$70 hours) and $\gamma_{2} =$ 1.92 for large waiting times ($>$100 hours). The break of the WTD of SEEs is probably due to the modulation of the corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The power-law index $\gamma \sim$ 1.82 is derived for the WTD of SPEs that is consistent with the WTD of type II radio bursts, indicating a close relationship between the shock wave and the production of energetic protons. The WTDs of SEP events can be modeled with a non-stationary Poisson process which was proposed to understand the waiting time statistics of solar flares (Wheatland 2000; Aschwanden $\&$ McTiernan 2010). We generalize the method and find that, if the SEP event rate $\lambda = 1/\Delta t$ varies as the time distribution of event rate $f(\lambda) = A \lambda^{-\alpha}exp(-\beta \lambda)$, the time-dependent Poisson distribution can produce a power-law tail WTD $\sim \Delta t^{\alpha - 3}$, where $0 \leq \alpha < 2$.
  • We present a study of 7 large solar proton events (SPEs) of current solar cycle 24 (from 2009 January up to date). They were recorded by GOES spacecraft with highest proton fluxes over 200 pfu for energies $>$10 MeV. In situ particle measurements show that: (1) The profiles of the proton fluxes are highly dependent of the locations of their solar sources, namely flares or coronal mass ejections (CMEs); (2) The solar particle release (SPR) times fall in the decay phase of the flare emission, and are in accordance with the times when the CMEs travel to an average height of 7.9 solar radii; (3) The time differences between the SPR and the flare peak are also dependent of the locations of the solar active regions (ARs). The results tend to support the concept of proton acceleration by the CME-driven shock, even though there exists a possibility of particle acceleration at flare site with subsequent perpendicular diffusion of accelerated particles in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We derive the integral time-of-maximum (TOM) spectra of solar protons in two forms: a single power-law distribution and a power law broken with an exponential tail. It is found that the unique Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) event on 2012 May 17 displays a hardest spectrum and a largest broken energy that may explain why the this event could extend to relativistic energy.
  • We study the H$\alpha$ and Ca II 8542 \r{A} line spectra of four typical Ellerman bombs (EBs) in active region NOAA 11765 on 2013 June 6, observed with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph installed at the 1.6 meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. Considering that EBs may occur in a restricted region in the lower atmosphere, and that their spectral lines show particular features, we propose a two-cloud model to fit the observed line profiles. The lower cloud can account for the wing emission, and the upper cloud is mainly responsible for the absorption at line center. After choosing carefully the free parameters, we get satisfactory fitting results. As expected, the lower cloud shows an increase of the source function, corresponding to a temperature increase of 400--1000 K in EBs relative to the quiet Sun. This is consistent with previous results deduced from semi-empirical models and confirms that a local heating occurs in the lower atmosphere during the appearance of EBs. We also find that the optical depths can increase to some extent in both the lower and upper clouds, which may result from either a direct heating in the lower cloud, or illumination by an enhanced radiation on the upper cloud. The velocities derived from this method, however, are different from those obtained using the traditional bisector method, implying that one should be cautious when interpreting this parameter. The two-cloud model can thus be used as an efficient method to deduce the basic physical parameters of EBs.
  • We developed a method to automatically detect and trace solar filaments in H\alpha\ full-disk images. The program is able not only to recognize filaments and determine their properties, such as the position, the area, the spine, and other relevant parameters, but also to trace the daily evolution of the filaments. The program consists of three steps: First, preprocessing is applied to correct the original images; Second, the Canny edge-detection method is used to detect filaments; Third, filament properties are recognized through the morphological operators. To test the algorithm, we applied it to the observations from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), and the program is demonstrated to be robust and efficient. H\alpha\ images obtained by MLSO from 1998 to 2009 are analyzed, and a butterfly diagram of filaments is obtained. It shows that the latitudinal migration of solar filaments has three trends in the Solar Cycle 23: The drift velocity was fast from 1998 to the solar maximum; After the solar maximum, it became relatively slow. After 2006, the migration became divergent, signifying the solar minimum. About 60% filaments with the latitudes larger than $50^{\circ}$ migrate towards the polar regions with relatively high velocities, and the latitudinal migrating speeds in the northern and the southern hemispheres do not differ significantly in the Solar Cycle 23.
  • We present a general formula of the orbital magnetization of disordered systems based on the Keldysh Green's function theory in the gauge-covariant Wigner space. In our approach, the gauge invariance of physical quantities is ensured from the very beginning, and the vertex corrections are easily included. Our formula applies not only for insulators but also for metallic systems where the quasiparicle behavior is usually strongly modified by the disorder scattering. In the absence of disorders, our formula recovers the previous results obtained from the semiclassical theory and the perturbation theory. As an application, we calculate the orbital magnetization of a weakly disordered two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We find that for the short range disorder scattering, its major effect is to the shifting of the distribution of orbital magnetization corresponding to the quasiparticle energy renormalization.
  • Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in space and astrophysical plasmas in which oppositely directed magnetic fields changes its connectivity and eventually converts its energy into kinetic and thermal energy of the plasma. Recently, ubiquitous jets (for example, chromospheric anemone jets, penumbral microjets, umbral light bridge jets) have been observed by Solar Optical Telescope on board the satellite Hinode. These tiny and frequently occurring jets are considered to be a possible evidence of small-scale ubiquitous reconnection in the solar atmosphere. However, the details of three dimensional magnetic configuration are still not very clear. Here we propose a new model based on three dimensional simulations of magnetic reconnection using a typical current sheet magnetic configuration with a strong guide field. The most interesting feature is that the jets produced by the reconnection eventually move along the guide field lines. This model provides a fresh understanding of newly discovered ubiquitous jets and moreover a new observational basis for the theory of astrophysical magnetic reconnection.
  • The magnetization of heavy holes in III-V semiconductor quantum wells with Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in an external perpendicular magnetic field is theoretically studied. We concentrate on the effects on the magnetization induced by the system boundary, the Rashba SOC and the temperature. It is found that the sawtooth-like de Haas--van Alphen (dHvA) oscillations of the magnetization will change dramatically in the presence of such three factors. Especially, the effects of the edge states and Rashba SOC on the magnetization are more evident when the magnetic field is more small. The oscillation center will shift when the boundary effect is considered and the Rashba SOC will bring beating patterns to the dHvA oscillations. These effects on the dHvA oscillations are preferred to be observed at low temperature. With increasing the temperature, the dHvA oscillations turn to be blurred and eventually disappear.