• Given a set of multipartite entangled states, can we find a common state to prepare them by local operations and classical communication? Such a state, if exists, will be a common resource for the given set of states. We completely solve this problem for bipartite pure states case by explicitly constructing a unique optimal common resource state for any given set of states. In the multipartite setting, the general problem becomes quite complicated, and we focus on finding nontrivial common resources for the whole multipartite state space of given dimensions. We show that GHZ_3 is a nontrivial common resource for three-qubit systems.
  • The recent observation of high-harmonic generation from solids creates a new possibility for engineering fundamental strong-field processes by patterning the solid target with subwavelength nanostructures. All-dielectric metasurfaces exhibit high damage thresholds and strong enhancement of the driving field, making them attractive platforms to control high-harmonics and other high-field processes at nanoscales. Here we report enhanced non-perturbative high-harmonic emission from a Si metasurface that possesses a sharp Fano resonance resulting from a classical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency. Harmonic emission is enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned samples. The enhanced high harmonics are highly anisotropic with excitation polarization and are selective to excitation wavelength due to its resonant feature. By combining nanofabrication technology and ultrafast strong-field physics, our work paves the way for designing new compact ultrafast photonic devices that operate under high intensities and short wavelengths.
  • For a pair of observables, they are called "incompatible", if and only if the commutator between them does not vanish, which represents one of the key features in quantum mechanics. The question is, how can we characterize the incompatibility among three or more observables? Here we explore one possible route towards this goal through Heisenberg's uncertainty relations, which impose fundamental constraints on the measurement precisions for incompatible observables. Specifically, we quantify the incompatibility by the optimal state-independent bounds of additive variance-based uncertainty relations. In this way, the degree of incompatibility becomes an intrinsic property among the operators, but not on the quantum state. To justify our case, we focus on the incompatibility of spin systems. For an arbitrary setting of two or three linearly-independent Pauli-spin operators, the incompatibility is analytically solved, the spins are maximally incompatible if and only if they are orthogonal to each other. On the other hand, the measure of incompatibility represents a versatile tool for applications such as testing entanglement of bipartite states, and EPR-steering criteria.
  • An arbitrary unknown quantum state cannot be precisely measured or perfectly replicated. However, quantum teleportation allows faithful transfer of unknown quantum states from one object to another over long distance, without physical travelling of the object itself. Long-distance teleportation has been recognized as a fundamental element in protocols such as large-scale quantum networks and distributed quantum computation. However, the previous teleportation experiments between distant locations were limited to a distance on the order of 100 kilometers, due to photon loss in optical fibres or terrestrial free-space channels. An outstanding open challenge for a global-scale "quantum internet" is to significantly extend the range for teleportation. A promising solution to this problem is exploiting satellite platform and space-based link, which can conveniently connect two remote points on the Earth with greatly reduced channel loss because most of the photons' propagation path is in empty space. Here, we report the first quantum teleportation of independent single-photon qubits from a ground observatory to a low Earth orbit satellite - through an up-link channel - with a distance up to 1400 km. To optimize the link efficiency and overcome the atmospheric turbulence in the up-link, a series of techniques are developed, including a compact ultra-bright source of multi-photon entanglement, narrow beam divergence, high-bandwidth and high-accuracy acquiring, pointing, and tracking (APT). We demonstrate successful quantum teleportation for six input states in mutually unbiased bases with an average fidelity of 0.80+/-0.01, well above the classical limit. This work establishes the first ground-to-satellite up-link for faithful and ultra-long-distance quantum teleportation, an essential step toward global-scale quantum internet.
  • Weyl nodes are topological objects in three-dimensional metals. Their topological property can be revealed by studying the high-field transport properties of a Weyl semimetal. While the energy of the lowest Landau band (LLB) of a conventional Fermi pocket always increases with magnetic field due to the zero point energy, the LLB of Weyl cones remains at zero energy unless a strong magnetic field couples the Weyl fermions of opposite chirality. In the Weyl semimetal TaP, we achieve such a magnetic coupling between the electron-like Fermi pockets arising from the W1 Weyl fermions. As a result, their LLBs move above chemical potential, leading to a sharp sign reversal in the Hall resistivity at a specific magnetic field corresponding to the W1 Weyl node separation. By contrast, despite having almost identical carrier density, the annihilation is unobserved for the hole-like pockets because the W2 Weyl nodes are much further separated. These key findings, corroborated by other systematic analyses, reveal the nontrivial topology of Weyl fermions in high-field measurements.
  • The reduced density matrices of a many-body quantum system form a convex set, whose three-dimensional projection $\Theta$ is convex in $\mathbb{R}^3$. The boundary $\partial\Theta$ of $\Theta$ may exhibit nontrivial geometry, in particular ruled surfaces. Two physical mechanisms are known for the origins of ruled surfaces: symmetry breaking and gapless. In this work, we study the emergence of ruled surfaces for systems with local Hamiltonians in infinite spatial dimension, where the reduced density matrices are known to be separable as a consequence of the quantum de Finetti's theorem. This allows us to identify the reduced density matrix geometry with joint product numerical range $\Pi$ of the Hamiltonian interaction terms. We focus on the case where the interaction terms have certain structures, such that ruled surface emerge naturally when taking a convex hull of $\Pi$. We show that, a ruled surface on $\partial\Theta$ sitting in $\Pi$ has a gapless origin, otherwise it has a symmetry breaking origin. As an example, we demonstrate that a famous ruled surface, known as the oloid, is a possible shape of $\Theta$, with two boundary pieces of symmetry breaking origin separated by two gapless lines.
  • We find that the perfect distinguishability of two quantum operations by a parallel scheme depends only on an operator subspace generated from their Choi-Kraus operators. We further show that any operator subspace can be obtained from two quantum operations in such a way. This connection enables us to study the parallel distinguishability of operator subspaces directly without explicitly referring to the underlining quantum operations. We obtain a necessary and sufficient condition for the parallel distinguishability of an operator subspace that is either one-dimensional or Hermitian. In both cases the condition is equivalent to the non-existence of positive definite operator in the subspace, and an optimal discrimination protocol is obtained. Finally, we provide more examples to show that the non-existence of positive definite operator is sufficient for many other cases, but in general it is only a necessary condition.
  • We map categorical variables in a function approximation problem into Euclidean spaces, which are the entity embeddings of the categorical variables. The mapping is learned by a neural network during the standard supervised training process. Entity embedding not only reduces memory usage and speeds up neural networks compared with one-hot encoding, but more importantly by mapping similar values close to each other in the embedding space it reveals the intrinsic properties of the categorical variables. We applied it successfully in a recent Kaggle competition and were able to reach the third position with relative simple features. We further demonstrate in this paper that entity embedding helps the neural network to generalize better when the data is sparse and statistics is unknown. Thus it is especially useful for datasets with lots of high cardinality features, where other methods tend to overfit. We also demonstrate that the embeddings obtained from the trained neural network boost the performance of all tested machine learning methods considerably when used as the input features instead. As entity embedding defines a distance measure for categorical variables it can be used for visualizing categorical data and for data clustering.
  • The recent discovery of the first Weyl semimetal in TaAs provides the first observation of a Weyl fermion in nature and demonstrates a novel type of anomalous surface state, the Fermi arc. Like topological insulators, the bulk topological invariants of a Weyl semimetal are uniquely fixed by the surface states of a bulk sample. Here, we present a set of distinct conditions, accessible by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), each of which demonstrates topological Fermi arcs in a surface state band structure, with minimal reliance on calculation. We apply these results to TaAs and NbP. For the first time, we rigorously demonstrate a non-zero Chern number in TaAs by counting chiral edge modes on a closed loop. We further show that it is unreasonable to directly observe Fermi arcs in NbP by ARPES within available experimental resolution and spectral linewidth. Our results are general and apply to any new material to demonstrate a Weyl semimetal.
  • In this paper, we give a complete description of the complex and the real Waring ranks of reducible cubic forms over C.
  • In this paper, we study the real and the complex Waring rank of reducible cubic forms. In particular, we compute the complex rank of all reducible cubic forms. In the real case, for all reducible cubics, we either compute or bound the real rank depending on the signature of the degree two factor.
  • Weyl semimetals are expected to open up new horizons in physics and materials science because they provide the first realization of Weyl fermions and exhibit protected Fermi arc surface states. However, they had been found to be extremely rare in nature. Recently, a family of compounds, consisting of TaAs, TaP, NbAs and NbP was predicted as Weyl semimetal candidates. Here, we experimentally realize a Weyl semimetal state in TaP. Using photoemission spectroscopy, we directly observe the Weyl fermion cones and nodes in the bulk and the Fermi arcs on the surface. Moreover, we find that the surface states show an unexpectedly rich structure, including both topological Fermi arcs and several topologically-trivial closed contours in the vicinity of the Weyl points, which provides a promising platform to study the interplay between topological and trivial surface states on a Weyl semimetal's surface. We directly demonstrate the bulk-boundary correspondence and hence establish the topologically nontrivial nature of the Weyl semimetal state in TaP, by resolving the net number of chiral edge modes on a closed path that encloses the Weyl node. This also provides, for the first time, an experimentally practical approach to demonstrating a bulk Weyl fermion from a surface state dispersion measured in photoemission.
  • Weyl semimetals may open a new era in condensed matter physics, materials science and nanotech after graphene and topological insulators. We report the first atomic scale view of the surface states of a Weyl semimetal (NbP) using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. We observe coherent quantum interference patterns that arise from the scattering of quasiparticles near point defects on the surface. The measurements reveal the surface electronic structure both below and above the chemical potential in both real and reciprocal spaces. Moreover, the interference maps uncover the scattering processes of NbP's exotic surface states. Through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations, we further discover that the scattering channels are largely restricted by the orbital and/or spin texture of the surface band. The visualization of the scattering processes can help design novel transport effects and electronics on the topological surface of a Weyl semimetal.
  • A Weyl semimetal is a new state of matter that host Weyl fermions as quasiparticle excitations. The Weyl fermions at zero energy correspond to points of bulk band degeneracy, Weyl nodes, which are separated in momentum space and are connected only through the crystal's boundary by an exotic Fermi arc surface state. We experimentally measure the spin polarization of the Fermi arcs in the first experimentally discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. Our spin data, for the first time, reveal that the Fermi arcs' spin polarization magnitude is as large as 80% and possesses a spin texture that is completely in-plane. Moreover, we demonstrate that the chirality of the Weyl nodes in TaAs cannot be inferred by the spin texture of the Fermi arcs. The observed non-degenerate property of the Fermi arcs is important for the establishment of its exact topological nature, which reveal that spins on the arc form a novel type of 2D matter. Additionally, the nearly full spin polarization we observed (~80%) may be useful in spintronic applications.
  • The recent experimental discovery of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs provides the first observation of a Weyl fermion in nature and demonstrates a novel type of anomalous surface state band structure, consisting of Fermi arcs. So far, work has focused on Weyl semimetals with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). However, Weyl semimetals with weak SOC may allow tunable spin-splitting for device applications and may exhibit a crossover to a spinless topological phase, such as a Dirac line semimetal in the case of spinless TaAs. NbP, isostructural to TaAs, may realize the first Weyl semimetal in the limit of weak SOC. Here we study the surface states of NbP by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and we find that we $\textit{cannot}$ show Fermi arcs based on our experimental data alone. We present an $\textit{ab initio}$ calculation of the surface states of NbP and we find that the Weyl points are too close and the Fermi level is too low to show Fermi arcs either by (1) directly measuring an arc or (2) counting chiralities of edge modes on a closed path. Nonetheless, the excellent agreement between our experimental data and numerical calculations suggests that NbP is a Weyl semimetal, consistent with TaAs, and that we observe trivial surface states which evolve continuously from the topological Fermi arcs above the Fermi level. Based on these results, we propose a slightly different criterion for a Fermi arc which, unlike (1) and (2) above, does not require us to resolve Weyl points or the spin splitting of surface states. We propose that raising the Fermi level by $> 20$ meV would make it possible to observe a Fermi arc using this criterion in NbP. Our work offers insight into Weyl semimetals with weak spin-orbit coupling, as well as the crossover from the spinful topological Weyl semimetal to the spinless topological Dirac line semimetal.
  • We report extremely large magnetoresistance (MR) in an extended temperature regime from 1.5 K to 300 K in non-magnetic binary compounds TaP and NbP. TaP exhibits linear MR around $1.8\times 10^4$ at 2 K in a magnetic field of 9 Tesla, which further follows its linearity up to $1.4\times 10^5$ in a magnetic field of 56 Tesla at 1.5 K. At room temperature the MR for TaP and NbP follows a power law of the exponent about $1.5$ with the values larger than $300\%$ in a magnetic field of 9 Tesla. Such large MR in a wide temperature regime is not likely only due to a resonance of the electron-hole balance, but indicates a complicated mechanism underneath.
  • The spin-boson model, describing a two-level system coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators, is a generic model for quantum dissipation, with manifold applications. It has also been studied as a simple example for an impurity quantum phase transition. Here we present a detailed study of a U(1)-symmetric two-bath spin-boson model, where two different components of an SU(2) spin 1/2 are coupled to separate dissipative baths. Non-trivial physics arises from the competition of the two dissipation channels, resulting in a variety of phases and quantum phase transitions. We employ a combination of analytical and numerical techniques to determine the properties of both the stable phases and the quantum critical points. In particular, we find a critical intermediate-coupling phase which is bounded by a continuous quantum phase transition which violates the quantum-to-classical correspondence.
  • In this paper, we study the entanglement transformation rate between multipartite states under stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC). Firstly, we show that the entanglement transformation rate from $\ket{GHZ}=\tfrac{1}{\sqrt{2}}(\ket{000}+\ket{111})$ to $\ket{W}=\tfrac{1}{\sqrt{3}}(\ket{100}+\ket{010}+\ket{001})$ is 1, that is, one can obtain 1 copy of $W$-state, from 1 copy of $GHZ$-state by SLOCC, asymptotically. We then generalize this result to a lower bound on the rate that from $N$-partite $GHZ$-state to Dicke states. For some special cases, the optimality of this bound is proved. We then discuss the tensor rank of matrix permanent by evaluating the the tensor rank of Dicke state.
  • We study the generation of correlated photon pairs via spontaneous four wave mixing in a 15 cm long micro/nano-fiber (MNF). The MNF is properly fabricated to satisfy the phase matching condition for generating the signal and idler photon pairs at the wavelengths of about 1310 and 851 nm, respectively. Photon counting measurements yield a coincidence-to-accidental ratio of 530 for a photon production rate of about 0.002 (0.0005) per pulse in the signal (idler) band. We also analyze the spectral information of the signal photons originated from the spontaneous four wave mixing and Raman scattering. In addition to discovering some unique feature of Raman scattering, we find the bandwidth of the individual signal photons is much greater than the calculated value for the MNF with homogeneous structure. Our investigations indicate the MNF is a promising candidate for developing the sources of nonclassical light and the spectral property of photon pairs can be used to non-invasively test the diameter and homogeneity of the MNF.
  • For phase transitions in dissipative quantum impurity models, the existence of a quantum-to-classical correspondence has been discussed extensively. We introduce a variational matrix product state approach involving an optimized boson basis, rendering possible high-accuracy numerical studies across the entire phase diagram. For the sub-ohmic spin-boson model with a power-law bath spectrum $\propto \w^s$, we confirm classical mean-field behavior for $s<1/2$, correcting earlier numerical renormalization-group results. We also provide the first results for an XY-symmetric model of a spin coupled to two competing bosonic baths, where we find a rich phase diagram, including both critical and strong-coupling phases for $s<1$, different from that of classical spin chains. This illustrates that symmetries are decisive for whether or not a quantum-to-classical correspondence exists.
  • Tensor rank refers to the number of product states needed to express a given multipartite quantum state. Its non-additivity as an entanglement measure has recently been observed. In this note, we estimate the tensor rank of multiple copies of the tripartite state $\ket{W}=\tfrac{1}{\sqrt{3}}(\ket{100}+\ket{010}+\ket{001})$. Both an upper bound and a lower bound of this rank are derived. In particular, it is proven that the tensor rank of $\ket{W}^{\otimes 2}$ is seven, thus resolving a previously open problem. Some implications of this result are discussed in terms of transformation rates between $\ket{W}^{\otimes n}$ and multiple copies of the state $\ket{GHZ}=\tfrac{1}{\sqrt{2}}(\ket{000}+\ket{111})$.
  • We use the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group method (t-DMRG) to study the nonequilibrium dynamics of a benchmark quantum impurity system which has a time-dependent Hamiltonian. This model is a resonant-level model, obtained by a mapping from a certain Ohmic spin-boson model describing the dissipative Landau-Zener transition. We map the resonant-level model onto a Wilson chain, then calculate the time-dependent occupation $n_d(t)$ of the resonant level. We compare t-DMRG results with exact results at zero temperature and find very good agreement. We also give a physical interpretation of the numerical results.