• Streaking of photoelectrons with optical lasers has been widely used for temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. Recently, this technique has been adapted to characterize femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers with the streaking imprinted by farinfrared and Terahertz (THz) pulses. Here, we report successful implementation of THz streaking for time-stamping of an ultrashort relativistic electron beam of which the energy is several orders of magnitude higher than photoelectrons. Such ability is especially important for MeV ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications where electron beams with a few femtosecond pulse width may be obtained with longitudinal compression while the arrival time may fluctuate at a much larger time scale. Using this laser-driven THz streaking technique, the arrival time of an ultrashort electron beam with 6 fs (rms) pulse width has been determined with 1.5 fs (rms) accuracy. Furthermore, we have proposed and demonstrated a non-invasive method for correction of the timing jitter with femtosecond accuracy through measurement of the compressed beam energy, which may allow one to advance UED towards sub-10 fs frontier far beyond the ~100 fs (rms) jitter.
  • Overshadowing the superconducting dome in hole-doped cuprates, the pseudogap state is still one of the mysteries that no consensus can be achieved. It has been shown that the rotational symmetry is broken in this state and may result in a nematic phase transition, whose temperature seems to coincide with the onset temperature of the pseudogap state $T^*$ around optimal doping level, raising the question whether the pseudogap is resulted from the establishment of the nematic order. Here we report results of resistivity measurements under uniaxial pressure on several hole-doped cuprates, where the normalized slope of the elastoresisvity $\zeta$ can be obtained as illustrated in iron-based superconductors. The temperature dependence of $\zeta$ along particular lattice axes exhibits kink feature at $T_{k}$ and shows Curie-Weiss-like behavior above it, which suggests a spontaneous nematic transition. While $T_{k}$ seems to be the same as $T^*$ around optimal doping level, they become different in very underdoped La$_{2-x}$Sr$_{x}$CuO$_4$. Our results suggest that the nematic order is an electronic phase within the pseudogap state.
  • Sense and avoid capability enables insects to fly versatilely and robustly in dynamic complex environment. Their biological principles are so practical and efficient that inspired we human imitating them in our flying machines. In this paper, we studied a novel bio-inspired collision detector and its application on a quadcopter. The detector is inspired from LGMD neurons in the locusts, and modeled into an STM32F407 MCU. Compared to other collision detecting methods applied on quadcopters, we focused on enhancing the collision selectivity in a bio-inspired way that can considerably increase the computing efficiency during an obstacle detecting task even in complex dynamic environment. We designed the quadcopter's responding operation imminent collisions and tested this bio-inspired system in an indoor arena. The observed results from the experiments demonstrated that the LGMD collision detector is feasible to work as a vision module for the quadcopter's collision avoidance task.
  • For autonomous robots in dynamic environments mixed with human, it is vital to detect impending collision quickly and robustly. The biological visual systems evolved over millions of years may provide us efficient solutions for collision detection in complex environments. In the cockpit of locusts, two Lobula Giant Movement Detectors, i.e. LGMD1 and LGMD2, have been identified which respond to looming objects rigorously with high firing rates. Compared to LGMD1, LGMD2 matures early in the juvenile locusts with specific selectivity to dark moving objects against bright background in depth while not responding to light objects embedded in dark background - a similar situation which ground vehicles and robots are facing with. However, little work has been done on modeling LGMD2, let alone its potential in robotics and other vision-based applications. In this article, we propose a novel way of modeling LGMD2 neuron, with biased ON and OFF pathways splitting visual streams into parallel channels encoding brightness increments and decrements separately to fulfill its selectivity. Moreover, we apply a biophysical mechanism of spike frequency adaptation to shape the looming selectivity in such a collision-detecting neuron model. The proposed visual neural network has been tested with systematic experiments, challenged against synthetic and real physical stimuli, as well as image streams from the sensor of a miniature robot. The results demonstrated this framework is able to detect looming dark objects embedded in bright backgrounds selectively, which make it ideal for ground mobile platforms. The robotic experiments also showed its robustness in collision detection - it performed well for near range navigation in an arena with many obstacles. Its enhanced collision selectivity to dark approaching objects versus receding and translating ones has also been verified via systematic experiments.
  • WTe2 has attracted a great deal of attention because it exhibits extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance. The underlying origin of such a giant magnetoresistance is still under debate. Utilizing laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with high energy and momentum resolutions, we reveal the complete electronic structure of WTe2. This makes it possible to determine accurately the electron and hole concentrations and their temperature dependence. We find that, with increasing the temperature, the overall electron concentration increases while the total hole concentration decreases. It indicates that the electron-hole compensation, if it exists, can only occur in a narrow temperature range, and in most of the temperature range there is an electron-hole imbalance. Our results are not consistent with the perfect electron-hole compensation picture that is commonly considered to be the cause of the unusual magnetoresistance in WTe2. We identified a flat band near the Brillouin zone center that is close to the Fermi level and exhibits a pronounced temperature dependence. Such a flat band can play an important role in dictating the transport properties of WTe2. Our results provide new insight on understanding the origin of the unusual magnetoresistance in WTe2.
  • We have carried out high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the Cebased heavy fermion compound CePt2In7 that exhibits stronger two-dimensional character than the prototypical heavy fermion system CeCoIn5. Multiple Fermi surface sheets and a complex band structure are clearly resolved. We have also performed detailed band structure calculations on CePt2In7. The good agreement found between our measurements and the calculations suggests that the band renormalization effect is rather weak in CePt2In7. A comparison of the common features of the electronic structure of CePt2In7 and CeCoIn5 indicates that CeCoIn5 shows a much stronger band renormalization effect than CePt2In7. These results provide new information for understanding the heavy fermion behaviors and unconventional superconductivity in Ce-based heavy fermion systems.
  • One of the biggest puzzles concerning the cuprate high temperature superconductors is what determines the maximum transition temperature (Tc,max), which varies from less than 30 K to above 130 K in different compounds. Despite this dramatic variation, a robust trend is that within each family, the double-layer compound always has higher Tc,max than the single-layer counterpart. Here we use scanning tunneling microscopy to investigate the electronic structure of four cuprate parent compounds belonging to two different families. We find that within each family, the double layer compound has a much smaller charge transfer gap size ($\Delta_{CT}$), indicating a clear anticorrelation between $\Delta_{CT}$ and Tc,max. These results suggest that the charge transfer gap plays a key role in the superconducting physics of cuprates, which shed important new light on the high Tc mechanism from doped Mott insulator perspective.
  • Quantum topological materials, exemplified by topological insulators, three-dimensional Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently because of their unique electronic structure and physical properties. Very lately it is proposed that the three-dimensional Weyl semimetals can be further classified into two types. In the type I Weyl semimetals, a topologically protected linear crossing of two bands, i.e., a Weyl point, occurs at the Fermi level resulting in a point-like Fermi surface. In the type II Weyl semimetals, the Weyl point emerges from a contact of an electron and a hole pocket at the boundary resulting in a highly tilted Weyl cone. In type II Weyl semimetals, the Lorentz invariance is violated and a fundamentally new kind of Weyl Fermions is produced that leads to new physical properties. WTe2 is interesting because it exhibits anomalously large magnetoresistance. It has ignited a new excitement because it is proposed to be the first candidate of realizing type II Weyl Fermions. Here we report our angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) evidence on identifying the type II Weyl Fermion state in WTe2. By utilizing our latest generation laser-based ARPES system with superior energy and momentum resolutions, we have revealed a full picture on the electronic structure of WTe2. Clear surface state has been identified and its connection with the bulk electronic states in the momentum and energy space shows a good agreement with the calculated band structures with the type II Weyl states. Our results provide spectroscopic evidence on the observation of type II Weyl states in WTe2. It has laid a foundation for further exploration of novel phenomena and physical properties in the type II Weyl semimetals.
  • Topological quantum materials, including topological insulators and superconductors, Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently for their unique electronic structure, spin texture and physical properties. Very lately, a new type of Weyl semimetals has been proposed where the Weyl Fermions emerge at the boundary between electron and hole pockets in a new phase of matter, which is distinct from the standard type I Weyl semimetals with a point-like Fermi surface. The Weyl cone in this type II semimetals is strongly tilted and the related Fermi surface undergos a Lifshitz transition, giving rise to a new kind of chiral anomaly and other new physics. MoTe2 is proposed to be a candidate of a type II Weyl semimetal; the sensitivity of its topological state to lattice constants and correlation also makes it an ideal platform to explore possible topological phase transitions. By performing laser-based angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements with unprecedentedly high resolution, we have uncovered electronic evidence of type II semimetal state in MoTe2. We have established a full picture of the bulk electronic states and surface state for MoTe2 that are consistent with the band structure calculations. A single branch of surface state is identified that connects bulk hole pockets and bulk electron pockets. Detailed temperature-dependent ARPES measurements show high intensity spot-like features that is ~40 meV above the Fermi level and is close to the momentum space consistent with the theoretical expectation of the type II Weyl points. Our results constitute electronic evidence on the nature of the Weyl semimetal state that favors the presence of two sets of type II Weyl points in MoTe2.
  • The topological materials have attracted much attention recently. While three-dimensional topological insulators are becoming abundant, two-dimensional topological insulators remain rare, particularly in natural materials. ZrTe5 has host a long-standing puzzle on its anomalous transport properties; its underlying origin remains elusive. Lately, ZrTe5 has ignited renewed interest because it is predicted that single-layer ZrTe5 is a two-dimensional topological insulator and there is possibly a topological phase transition in bulk ZrTe5. However, the topological nature of ZrTe5 is under debate as some experiments point to its being a three-dimensional or quasi-two-dimensional Dirac semimetal. Here we report high-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements on ZrTe5. The electronic property of ZrTe5 is dominated by two branches of nearly-linear-dispersion bands at the Brillouin zone center. These two bands are separated by an energy gap that decreases with decreasing temperature but persists down to the lowest temperature we measured (~2 K). The overall electronic structure exhibits a dramatic temperature dependence; it evolves from a p-type semimetal with a hole-like Fermi pocket at high temperature, to a semiconductor around ~135 K where its resistivity exhibits a peak, to an n-type semimetal with an electron-like Fermi pocket at low temperature. These results indicate a clear electronic evidence of the temperature-induced Lifshitz transition in ZrTe5. They provide a natural understanding on the underlying origin of the resistivity anomaly at ~135 K and its associated reversal of the charge carrier type. Our observations also provide key information on deciphering the topological nature of ZrTe5 and possible temperature-induced topological phase transition.
  • High resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on transition metal dichalcogenide PdTe2 that is a superconductor with a Tc at 1.7 K. Combined with theoretical calculations, we have discovered for the first time the existence of topologically nontrivial surface state with Dirac cone in PbTe2 superconductor. It is located at the Brillouin zone center and possesses helical spin texture. Distinct from the usual three-dimensional topological insulators where the Dirac cone of the surface state lies at the Fermi level, the Dirac point of the surface state in PdTe2 lies deep below the Fermi level at ~1.75 eV binding energy and is well separated from the bulk states. The identification of topological surface state in PdTe2 superconductor deep below the Fermi level provides a unique system to explore for new phenomena and properties and opens a door for finding new topological materials in transition metal chalcogenides.
  • The layered transition metal chalcogenides have been a fertile land in solid state physics for many decades. Various MX2-type transition metal dichalcogenides, such as WTe2, IrTe2, and MoS2, have triggered great attention recently, either for the discovery of novel phenomena or some extreme or exotic physical properties, or for their potential applications. PdTe2 is a superconductor in the class of transition metal dichalcogenides, and superconductivity is enhanced in its Cu-intercalated form, Cu0.05PdTe2. It is important to study the electronic structures of PdTe2 and its intercalated form in order to explore for new phenomena and physical properties and understand the related superconductivity enhancement mechanism. Here we report systematic high resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies on PdTe2 and Cu0.05$PdTe2 single crystals, combined with the band structure calculations. We present for the first time in detail the complex multi-band Fermi surface topology and densely-arranged band structure of these compounds. By carefully examining the electronic structures of the two systems, we find that Cu-intercalation in PdTe2 results in electron-doping, which causes the band structure to shift downwards by nearly 16 meV in Cu0.05PdTe2. Our results lay a foundation for further exploration and investigation on PdTe2 and related superconductors.
  • Silicene, analogous to graphene, is a one-atom-thick two-dimensional crystal of silicon which is expected to share many of the remarkable properties of graphene. The buckled honeycomb structure of silicene, along with its enhanced spin-orbit coupling, endows silicene with considerable advantages over graphene in that the spin-split states in silicene are tunable with external fields. Although the low-energy Dirac cone states lie at the heart of all novel quantum phenomena in a pristine sheet of silicene, the question of whether or not these key states can survive when silicene is grown or supported on a substrate remains hotly debated. Here we report our direct observation of Dirac cones in monolayer silicene grown on a Ag(111) substrate. By performing angle-resolved photoemission measurements on silicene(3x3)/Ag(111), we reveal the presence of six pairs of Dirac cones on the edges of the first Brillouin zone of Ag(111), other than expected six Dirac cones at the K points of the primary silicene(1x1) Brillouin zone. Our result shows clearly that the unusual Dirac cone structure originates not from the pristine silicene alone but from the combined effect of silicene(3x3) and the Ag(111) substrate. This study identifies the first case of a new type of Dirac Fermion generated through the interaction of two different constituents. Our observation of Dirac cones in silicene/Ag(111) opens a new materials platform for investigating unusual quantum phenomena and novel applications based on two-dimensional silicon systems.