• There has been an increasing interest in testing the equality of large Pearson's correlation matrices. However, in many applications it is more important to test the equality of large rank-based correlation matrices since they are more robust to outliers and nonlinearity. Unlike the Pearson's case, testing the equality of large rank-based statistics has not been well explored and requires us to develop new methods and theory. In this paper, we provide a framework for testing the equality of two large U-statistic based correlation matrices, which include the rank-based correlation matrices as special cases. Our approach exploits extreme value statistics and the Jackknife estimator for uncertainty assessment and is valid under a fully nonparametric model. Theoretically, we develop a theory for testing the equality of U-statistic based correlation matrices. We then apply this theory to study the problem of testing large Kendall's tau correlation matrices and demonstrate its optimality. For proving this optimality, a novel construction of least favourable distributions is developed for the correlation matrix comparison.
  • Thermal-diffusional pulsation behaviors in planar as well as outwardly and inwardly propagating white dwarf carbon flames are systematically studied. In the 1D numerical simulation, the asymptotic degenerate equation of state and simplified one-step reaction rates for nuclear reactions are used to study the flame propagation and pulsation in white dwarfs. The numerical critical Zel'dovich numbers of planar flames at different densities ($\rho=2$, 3 and 4$\times 10^7$~g/cm$^3$) and of spherical flames (with curvature $c=$-0.01, 0, 0.01 and 0.05) at a particular density ($\rho=2\times 10^7$~g/cm$^3$) are presented. Flame front pulsation in different environmental densities and temperatures are obtained to form the regime diagram of pulsation, showing that carbon flames pulsate in the typical density of $2\times10^7~{\rm g/cm^3}$ and temperature of $0.6\times 10^9~{\rm K}$. While being stable at higher temperatures, at relatively lower temperatures the amplitude of the flame pulsation becomes larger. In outwardly propagating spherical flames the pulsation instability is enhanced and flames are also easier to quench due to pulsation at small radius, while the inwardly propagating flames are more stable.
  • A wireless video transmission architecture relying on the emerging large-scale multiple-input--multiple-output (LS-MIMO) technique is proposed. Upon using the most advanced High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) (also known as H.265), we demonstrate that the proposed architecture invoking the low-complexity linear zero-forcing (ZF) detector and dispensing with any channel coding is capable of significantly outperforming the conventional small-scale MIMO based architecture, even if the latter employs the high-complexity optimal maximum-likelihood (ML) detector and a rate-$1/3$ recursive systematic convolutional (RSC) channel codec. Specifically, compared to the conventional small-scale MIMO system, the effective system throughput of the proposed LS-MIMO based scheme is increased by a factor of up to three and the quality of reconstructed video quantified in terms of the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) is improved by about $22.5\, \text{dB}$ at a channel-SNR of $E_b/N_0 \approx 6\,\text{dB}$ for delay-tolerant video-file delivery applications, and about $20\,\text{dB}$ for lip-synchronized real-time interactive video applications. Alternatively, viewing the attainable improvement from a power-saving perspective, a channel-SNR gain as high as $\Delta_{E_b/N_0}\approx 5\,\text{dB}$ is observed at a PSNR of $36\, \text{dB}$ for the scenario of delay-tolerant video applications and again, an even higher gain is achieved in the real-time video application scenario. Therefore, we envisage that LS-MIMO aided wireless multimedia communications is capable of dispensing with power-thirsty channel codec altogether!
  • A simple and robust experiment demonstrating computational ghost imaging with structured illumination and a single-pixel detector has been performed. Our experimental setup utilizes a general computer for generating pseudo-randomly patterns on the liquid crystal display screen to illuminate a partially-transmissive object. With an incoherent light source, this object is imaged. The effects of light source, light path, and the number of measurements on the reconstruction quality of the object are discussed both theoretically and experimentally. The realization of computational ghost imaging with computer liquid crystal display is a further setup toward the practical application of ghost imaging with ordinary incoherent light.
  • The Kibble-Zurek mechanism provides a description of the topological structure occurring in the symmetry breaking phase transitions, which may manifest as the cosmological strings in the early universe or vortex lines in the superfulid. A particularly intriguing analogy between Kibble-Zurek mechanism and a text book quantum phenomenon, Landau-Zener transition has been discovered, but is difficult to observe up to now. In recent years, there has been broad interest in quantum simulations using different well-controlled physical setups, in which full tunability allows access to unexplored parameter regimes. Here we demonstrate a proof-of-principle quantum simulation of Kibble-Zurek mechanism using a single electron charge qubit in double quantum dot, set to behave as Landau-Zener dynamics. We measure the qubit states as a function of driven pulse velocity and successfully reproduce Kibble-Zurek like dependence of topological defect density on the quench rate. The high-level controllability of semiconductor two-level system make it a platform to test the key elements of topological defect formation process and shed a new insight on the aspect of non-equilibrium phase transitions.
  • The quantum point contact (QPC) back-action has been found to cause non-thermal-equilibrium excitations to the electron spin states in a quantum dot (QD). Here we use back-action as an excitation source to probe the spin excited states spectroscopy for both the odd and even electron numbers under a varying parallel magnetic field. For a single electron, we observed the Zeeman splitting. For two electrons, we observed the splitting of the spin triplet states $|T^{+}>$ and $|T^{0}>$ and found that back-action drives the singlet state $|S>$ overwhelmingly to $|T^{+}>$ other than $|T^{0}>$. All these information were revealed through the real-time charge counting statistics.
  • In a single quantum dot (QD), the electrons were driven out of thermal equilibrium by the back-action from a nearby quantum point contact (QPC). We found the driving to energy excited states can be probed with the random telegraph signal (RTS) statistics, when the excited states relax slowly compared with RTS tunneling rate. We studied the last few electrons, and found back-action driven spin singlet-triplet (S-T) excitation for and only for all the even number of electrons. We developed a phenomenological model to quantitatively characterize the spin S-T excitation rate, which enabled us to evaluate the influence of back-action on spin S-T based qubit operations.
  • We report our study of the real-time charge counting statistics measured by a quantum point contact (QPC) coupled to a single quantum dot (QD) under different back-action strength. By tuning the QD-QPC coupling or QPC bias, we controlled the QPC back-action which drives the QD electrons out of thermal equilibrium. The random telegraph signal (RTS) statistics showed strong and tunable non-thermal-equilibrium saturation effect, which can be quantitatively characterized as a back-action induced tunneling out rate. We found that the QD-QPC coupling and QPC bias voltage played different roles on the back-action strength and cut-off energy.
  • We have developed an etching process to fabricate a quantum dot and a nearby single electron transistor as a charge detector in a single layer graphene. The high charge sensitivity of the detector is used to probe Coulomb diamonds as well as excited spectrum in the dot, even in the regime where the current through the quantum dot is too small to be measured by conventional transport means. The graphene based quantum dot and integrated charge sensor serve as an essential building block to form a solid-state qubit in a nuclear-spin-free quantum world.
  • We investigate the low-temperature magneto-transport properties of individual Ge/Si core/shell nanowires. Negative magneto-conductance was observed, which is a signature of one-dimensional weak antilocalization of holes in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling. The temperature and back gate dependences of phase coherence length, spin-orbit relaxation time, and background conductance were studied. Specifically, we show the spin-orbit coupling strength can be modulated by more than five folds with an external electric field. These results suggest the Ge/Si nanowire system possesses strong and tunable spin-orbit interactions and may serve as a candidate for spintronics applications.
  • We experimentally study the electrical transport properties of Ge/Si core/shell nanowire device with two superconducting leads in the Coulomb blockade regime. Anomalous zero field magnetoconductance peaks are observed for the first time at the gate voltages where Coulomb blockade oscillation peaks present. Many evidences indicate this feature is due to Andreev reflection enhanced phase coherent single hole tunneling through the quantum dot, which can be suppressed by an external magnetic field without destroying the superconducting states in the electrodes.