• Galaxy spectra are essential to probe the spatial distribution of galaxies in our Universe. To better interpret current and future spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys, it is important to be able to simulate these data sets. We describe Uspec, a forward modeling tool to generate galaxy spectra taking into account intrinsic galaxy properties as well as instrumental responses of a given telescope. The model for the intrinsic properties of the galaxy population was developed in an earlier work for broad-band imaging surveys [1]. We apply Uspec to the SDSS/CMASS sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). We construct selection cuts that match those used to build this LRG sample, which we then apply to data and simulations in the same way. The resulting real and simulated average spectra show a very good agreement overall, with the simulated one showing a slightly bluer galaxy population. For a quantitative comparison, we perform Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the sets of spectra. By comparing the PCs constructed from simulations and data, we find very good agreement for the first four components, and moderate for the fifth. The distributions of the eigencoefficients also show an appreciable overlap. We are therefore able to properly simulate the LRG sample taking into account the SDSS/BOSS instrumental responses. The small residual differences between the two samples can be ascribed to the intrinsic properties of the simulated galaxy population, which can be reduced by adjusting the model parameters in the future. This provides good prospects for the forward modeling of upcoming large spectroscopic surveys.
  • Weak gravitational lensing can cause displacements, magnification, rotation and shearing of the images of distant galaxies. Most studies focus on the shear and magnification effects since they are more easily observed. In this paper we focus on the effect of lensing displacements on wide field images. Galaxies at redshifts 0.5--1 are typically displaced by 1 arcminute, and the displacements are coherent over degree-size patches. However the displacement effect is redshift-dependent, so there is a visible relative shift between galaxies at different redshifts, even if they are close on the sky. We show that the reconstruction of the original galaxy position is now feasible with lensing surveys that cover many hundreds of square degrees. We test with simulations two approaches to "delensing": one uses shear measurements and the other uses the foreground galaxy distribution as a proxy for the mass. We also estimate the effect of foreground deflections on galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements and find it is relevant only for LSST and Euclid-era surveys.
  • Mass around dark matter halos can be divided into "infalling" material and "collapsed" material that has passed through at least one pericenter. Analytical models and simulations predict a rapid drop in the halo density profile associated with the transition between these two regimes. Using data from SDSS, we explore the evidence for such a feature in the density profiles of galaxy clusters and investigate the connection between this feature and a possible phase space boundary. We first estimate the steepening of the outer galaxy density profile around clusters: the profiles show an abrupt steepening, providing evidence for truncation of the halo profile. Next, we measure the galaxy density profile around clusters using two sets of galaxies selected based on color. We find evidence of an abrupt change in the galaxy colors that coincides with the location of the steepening of the density profile. Since galaxies are likely to be quenched of star formation and turn red inside of clusters, this change in the galaxy color distribution can be interpreted as the transition from an infalling regime to a collapsed regime. We also measure this transition using a model comparison approach which has been used recently in studies of the "splashback" phenomenon, but find that this approach is not a robust way to quantify the significance of detecting a splashback-like feature. Finally, we perform measurements using an independent cluster catalog to test for potential systematic errors associated with cluster selection. We identify several avenues for future work: improved understanding of the small-scale galaxy profile, lensing measurements, identification of proxies for the halo accretion rate, and other tests. With upcoming data from the DES, KiDS and HSC surveys, we can expect significant improvements in the study of halo boundaries.
  • We propose a novel approach for mitigating radio frequency interference (RFI) signals in radio data using the latest advances in deep learning. We employ a special type of Convolutional Neural Network, the U-Net, that enables the classification of clean signal and RFI signatures in 2D time-ordered data acquired from a radio telescope. We train and assess the performance of this network using the HIDE & SEEK radio data simulation and processing packages, as well as early Science Verification data acquired with the 7m single-dish telescope at the Bleien Observatory. We find that our U-Net implementation is showing competitive accuracy to classical RFI mitigation algorithms such as SEEK's SumThreshold implementation. We publish our U-Net software package on GitHub under GPLv3 license.
  • As several large single-dish radio surveys begin operation within the coming decade, a wealth of radio data will become available and provide a new window to the Universe. In order to fully exploit the potential of these data sets, it is important to understand the systematic effects associated with the instrument and the analysis pipeline. A common approach to tackle this is to forward-model the entire system - from the hardware to the analysis of the data products. For this purpose, we introduce two newly developed, open-source Python packages: the HI Data Emulator (HIDE) and the Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer (SEEK) for simulating and processing single-dish radio survey data. HIDE forward-models the process of collecting astronomical radio signals in a single-dish radio telescope instrument and outputs pixel-level time-ordered-data. SEEK processes the time-ordered-data, removes artifacts from Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), automatically applies flux calibration, and aims to recover the astronomical radio signal. The two packages can be used separately or together depending on the application. Their modular and flexible nature allows easy adaptation to other instruments and data sets. We describe the basic architecture of the two packages and examine in detail the noise and RFI modeling in HIDE, as well as the implementation of gain calibration and RFI mitigation in SEEK. We then apply HIDE & SEEK to forward-model a Galactic survey in the frequency range 990 - 1260 MHz based on data taken at the Bleien Observatory. For this survey, we expect to cover 70% of the full sky and achieve a median signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 5 - 6 in the cleanest channels including systematic uncertainties. However, we also point out the potential challenges of high RFI contamination and baseline removal when examining the early data from the Bleien Observatory.
  • We describe the design and performance of the hardware system at the Bleien Observatory. The system is designed to deliver a map of the Galaxy for studying the foreground contamination of low-redshift (z=0.13--0.43) H$_{\rm I}$ intensity mapping experiments as well as other astronomical Galactic studies. This hardware system is composed of a 7m parabolic dish, a dual-polarization corrugated horn feed, a pseudo correlation receiver, a Fast Fourier Transform spectrometer, and an integrated control system that controls and monitors the progress of the data collection. The main innovative designs in the hardware are (1) the pseudo correlation receiver and the cold reference source within (2) the high dynamic range, high frequency resolution spectrometer and (3) the phase-switch implementation of the system. This is the first time these technologies are used together for a L-band radio telescope to achieve an electronically stable system, which is an essential first step for wide-field cosmological measurements. This work demonstrates the prospects and challenges for future H$_{\rm I}$ intensity mapping experiments.
  • We present a new method to measure the redshift-dependent galaxy bias by combining information from the galaxy density field and the weak lensing field. This method is based on Amara et al. (2012), where they use the galaxy density field to construct a bias-weighted convergence field kg. The main difference between Amara et al. (2012) and our new implementation is that here we present another way to measure galaxy bias using tomography instead of bias parameterizations. The correlation between kg and the true lensing field k allows us to measure galaxy bias using different zero-lag correlations, such as <kgk>/<kk> or <kgkg>/<kgk>. Our method measures the linear bias factor on linear scales under the assumption of no stochasticity between galaxies and matter. We use the MICE simulation to measure the linear galaxy bias for a flux-limited sample (i < 22.5) in tomographic redshift bins using this method. This paper is the first that studies the accuracy and systematic uncertainties associated with the implementation of the method, and the regime where it is consistent with the linear galaxy bias defined by projected 2-point correlation functions (2PCF). We find that our method is consistent with linear bias at the percent level for scales larger than 30 arcmin, while nonlinearities appear at smaller scales. This measurement is a good complement to other measurements of bias, since it does not depend strongly on sigma8 as the 2PCF measurements. We apply this method to the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data in a follow-up paper.
  • We present a multi-frequency far-field beam map for the 5m dish telescope at the Bleien Observatory measured using a commercially available drone. We describe the hexacopter drone used in this experiment, the design of the flight pattern, and the data analysis scheme. This is the first application of this calibration method to a single dish radio telescope in the far-field. The high signal-to-noise data allows us to characterise the beam pattern with high accuracy out to at least the 4th side-lobe. The resulting 2D beam pattern is compared with that derived from a more traditional calibration approach using an astronomical calibration source. We discuss the advantages of this method compared to other beam calibration methods. Our results show that this drone-based technique is very promising for ongoing and future radio experiments, where the knowledge of the beam pattern is key to obtaining high-accuracy cosmological and astronomical measurements.
  • The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 3 (GREAT3) challenge is the third in a series of image analysis challenges, with a goal of testing and facilitating the development of methods for analyzing astronomical images that will be used to measure weak gravitational lensing. This measurement requires extremely precise estimation of very small galaxy shape distortions, in the presence of far larger intrinsic galaxy shapes and distortions due to the blurring kernel caused by the atmosphere, telescope optics, and instrumental effects. The GREAT3 challenge is posed to the astronomy, machine learning, and statistics communities, and includes tests of three specific effects that are of immediate relevance to upcoming weak lensing surveys, two of which have never been tested in a community challenge before. These effects include realistically complex galaxy models based on high-resolution imaging from space; spatially varying, physically-motivated blurring kernel; and combination of multiple different exposures. To facilitate entry by people new to the field, and for use as a diagnostic tool, the simulation software for the challenge is publicly available, though the exact parameters used for the challenge are blinded. Sample scripts to analyze the challenge data using existing methods will also be provided. See http://great3challenge.info and http://great3.projects.phys.ucl.ac.uk/leaderboard/ for more information.