• For a binary protostellar outflow system in which its members are located so close to each other (the separation being smaller than the addition of the widths of the flows) and with large opening angles, the collision seems unavoidable regardless of the orientation of the outflows. This is in contrast to the current observational evidence of just a few regions with indications of colliding outflows. Here, using sensitive observations of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), we report resolved images of carbon monoxide (CO) towards the binary flows associated with the BHR71 protostellar system. These images reveal for the first time solid evidence that their flows are partially colliding, increasing the brightness of the CO, the dispersion of the velocities in the interaction zone, and changing part of the orientation in one of the flows. Additionally, this impact opened the possibility of knowing the 3D geometry of the system, revealing that one of its components (IRS2) should be closer to us.
  • HH 212 is a Class 0 protostellar system found to host a "hamburger"-shaped dusty disk with a rotating disk atmosphere and a collimated SiO jet at a distance of ~ 400 pc. Recently, a compact rotating outflow has been detected in SO and SO2 toward the center along the jet axis at ~ 52 au (0.13") resolution. Here we resolve the compact outflow into a small-scale wide-opening rotating outflow shell and a collimated jet, with the observations in the same S-bearing molecules at ~ 16 au (0.04") resolution. The collimated jet is aligned with the SiO jet, tracing the shock interactions in the jet. The wide-opening outflow shell is seen extending out from the inner disk around the SiO jet and has a width of ~ 100 au. It is not only expanding away from the center, but also rotating around the jet axis. The specific angular momentum of the outflow shell is ~ 40 au km/s. Simple modeling of the observed kinematics suggests that the rotating outflow shell can trace either a disk wind or disk material pushed away by an unseen wind from the inner disk or protostar. We also resolve the disk atmosphere in the same S-bearing molecules, confirming the Keplerian rotation there.
  • HH212, a nearby (400 pc) object in Orion, is a Class 0 protostellar system with a Keplerian disk and collimated bipolar SiO jets. Deuterated water, HDO and a deuterated complex molecule, methanol (CH2DOH) have been reported in the source. Here, we report the HDCO (deuterated formaldehyde) line observation from ALMA data to probe the inner region of HH212. We compare HDCO line with other molecular lines to understand the possible chemistry and physics of the source. The distribution of HDCO emission suggests it may be associated with the base of the outflow. The emission also shows a rotation but it is not associated with the Keplerian rotation of disk or the rotating infalling envelope, rather it is associated with the outflow as previously seen in C 34 S. From the possible deuterium fractionation, we speculate that the gas phase formation of deuterated formaldehyde is active in the central hot region of the low-mass protostar system, HH212.
  • Polarized emission is detected in two young nearly edge-on protostellar disks in 343 GHz continuum at ~ 50 au (~ 0.12") resolution with Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. One disk is in HH 212 (Class 0) and the other in HH 111 (early Class I) protostellar system. Polarization fraction is ~ 1%. The disk in HH 212 has a radius of ~ 60 au. The emission is mainly detected from the nearside of the disk. The polarization orientations are almost perpendicular to the disk major axis, consistent with either self-scattering or emission by grains aligned with a poloidal field around the outer edge of the disk because of optical depth effect and temperature gradient; the presence of a poloidal field would facilitate the launching of a disk wind, for which there is already tentative evidence in the same source. The disk of HH 111 VLA 1 has a larger radius of ~ 220 au and is thus more resolved. The polarization orientations are almost perpendicular to the disk major axis in the nearside, but more along the major axis in the farside, forming roughly half of an elliptical pattern there. It appears that toroidal and poloidal magnetic field may explain the polarization on the near and far side of the disk, respectively. However, it is also possible that the polarization is due to self-scattering. In addition, alignment of dust grains by radiation flux may play a role in the farside. Our observations reveal a diversity of disk polarization patterns that should be taken into account in future modeling efforts.
  • We present interferometric and single-dish molecular line observations of the interstellar bullet-outflow source IRAS 05506+2414, whose wide-angle bullet spray is similar to the Orion BN/KL explosive outflow and likely arises from an entirely different mechanism than the classical accretion-disk-driven bipolar flows in young stellar objects. The bullet-outflow source is associated with a large pseudo-disk and three molecular outflows -- a high-velocity outflow (HVO), a medium-velocity outflow (MVO), and a slow, extended outflow (SEO). The size (mass) of the pseudo-disk is 10,350 AU x 6,400 AU (0.64-0.17 Msun); from a model-fit assuming infall and rotation we derive a central stellar mass of 8--19 Msun. The HVO (MVO) has an angular size ~5180 (~3330) AU, and a projected outflow velocity of ~140 km/s (~30 km/s). The SEO size (outflow speed) is ~0.9 pc (~6 km/s). The HVO's axis is aligned with (orthogonal to) that of the SEO (pseudo-disk). The velocity structure of the MVO is unresolved. The scalar momenta in the HVO and SEO are very similar, suggesting that the SEO has resulted from the HVO interacting with ambient cloud material. The bullet spray shares a common axis with the pseudo-disk, and has an age comparable to that of MVO (few hundred years), suggesting that these three structures are intimately linked together. We discuss several models for the outflows in IRAS 05506+2414 (including dynamical decay of a stellar cluster, chance encounter of a runaway star with a dense cloud, and close passage of two protostars), and conclude that 2nd-epoch imaging to derive proper motions of the bullets and nearby stars can help to discriminate between them.
  • Most protostars have luminosities that are fainter than expected from steady accretion over the protostellar lifetime. The solution to this problem may lie in episodic mass accretion -- prolonged periods of very low accretion punctuated by short bursts of rapid accretion. However, the timescale and amplitude for variability at the protostellar phase is almost entirely unconstrained. In "A JCMT/SCUBA-2 Transient Survey of Protostars in Nearby Star Forming Regions", we are monitoring monthly with SCUBA-2 the sub-mm emission in eight fields within nearby (<500 pc) star forming regions to measure the accretion variability of protostars. The total survey area of ~1.6 sq.deg. includes ~105 peaks with peaks brighter than 0.5 Jy/beam (43 associated with embedded protostars or disks) and 237 peaks of 0.125-0.5 Jy/beam (50 with embedded protostars or disks). Each field has enough bright peaks for flux calibration relative to other peaks in the same field, which improves upon the nominal flux calibration uncertainties of sub-mm observations to reach a precision of ~2-3% rms, and also provides quantified confidence in any measured variability. The timescales and amplitudes of any sub-mm variation will then be converted into variations in accretion rate and subsequently used to infer the physical causes of the variability. This survey is the first dedicated survey for sub-mm variability and complements other transient surveys at optical and near-IR wavelengths, which are not sensitive to accretion variability of deeply embedded protostars.
  • The protoplanetary disk around HL Tau is so far the youngest candidate of planet formation, and it is still embedded in a protostellar envelope with a size of thousands of au. In this work, we study the gas kinematics in the envelope and its possible influence on the embedded disk. We present our new ALMA cycle 3 observational results of HL Tau in the 13CO (2-1) and C18O (2-1) emission at resolutions of 0.8" (110 au), and we compare the observed velocity pattern with models of different kinds of gas motions. Both the 13CO and C18O emission lines show a central compact component with a size of 2" (280 au), which traces the protoplanetary disk. The disk is clearly resolved and shows a Keplerian motion, from which the protostellar mass of HL Tau is estimated to be 1.8+/-0.3 M$_\odot$, assuming the inclination angle of the disk to be 47 deg from the plane of the sky. The 13CO emission shows two arc structures with sizes of 1000-2000 au and masses of 3E-3 M$_\odot$ connected to the central disk. One is blueshifted and stretches from the northeast to the northwest, and the other is redshifted and stretches from the southwest to the southeast. We find that simple kinematical models of infalling and (counter-)rotating flattened envelopes cannot fully explain the observed velocity patterns in the arc structures. The gas kinematics of the arc structures can be better explained with three-dimensional infalling or outflowing motions. Nevertheless, the observed velocity in the northwestern part of the blueshifted arc structure is ~60-70% higher than the expected free-fall velocity. We discuss two possible origins of the arc structures: (1) infalling flows externally compressed by an expanding shell driven by XZ Tau and (2) outflowing gas clumps caused by gravitational instabilities in the protoplanetary disk around HL Tau.
  • The central problem in forming a star is the angular momentum in the circumstellar disk which prevents material from falling into the central stellar core. An attractive solution to the "angular momentum problem" appears to be the ubiquitous (low-velocity and poorly-collimated) molecular outflows and (high-velocity and highly-collimated) protostellar jets accompanying the earliest phase of star formation that remove angular momentum at a range of disk radii. Previous observations suggested that outflowing material carries away the excess angular momentum via magneto-centrifugally driven winds from the surfaces of circumstellar disks down to ~ 10 AU scales, allowing the material in the outer disk to transport to the inner disk. Here we show that highly collimated protostellar jets remove the residual angular momenta at the ~ 0.05 AU scale, enabling the material in the innermost region of the disk to accrete toward the central protostar. This is supported by the rotation of the jet measured down to ~ 10 AU from the protostar in the HH 212 protostellar system. The measurement implies a jet launching radius of ~ 0.05_{-0.02}^{+0.05} AU on the disk, based on the magneto-centrifugal theory of jet production, which connects the properties of the jet measured at large distances to those at its base through energy and angular momentum conservation.
  • HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system recently found to host a "hamburger"-shaped dusty disk with a radius of ~ 60 AU, deeply embedded in an infalling-rotating flattened envelope. We have spatially resolved this envelope-disk system with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at up to ~ 16 AU (0.04") resolution. The envelope is detected in HCO+ J=4-3 down to the dusty disk. Complex organic molecules (COMs) and doubly deuterated formaldehyde (D2CO) are detected above and below the dusty disk within ~ 40 AU of the central protostar. The COMs are methanol (CH3OH), deuterated methanol (CH2DOH), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and formamide (NH2CHO, a prebiotic precursor). We have modeled the gas kinematics in HCO+ and COMs, and found a centrifugal barrier at a radius of ~ 44 AU, within which a Keplerian rotating disk is formed. This indicates that HCO+ traces the infalling-rotating envelope down to centrifugal barrier and COMs trace the atmosphere of a Keplerian rotating disk within the centrifugal barrier. The COMs are spatially resolved for the first time, both radially and vertically, in the atmosphere of a disk in the earliest, Class 0 phase of star formation. Our spatially resolved observations of COMs favor their formation in the disk rather than a rapidly infalling (warm) inner envelope. The abundances and spatial distributions of the COMs provide strong constraints on models of their formation and transport in low-mass star formation.
  • In the earliest (so-called "Class 0") phase of sunlike (low-mass) star formation, circumstellar disks are expected to form, feeding the protostars. However, such disks are difficult to resolve spatially because of their small sizes. Moreover, there are theoretical difficulties in producing such disks in the earliest phase, due to the retarding effects of magnetic fields on the rotating, collapsing material (so-called "magnetic braking"). With the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), it becomes possible to uncover such disks and study them in detail. HH 212 is a very young protostellar system. With ALMA, we not only detect but also spatially resolve its disk in dust emission at submillimeter wavelength. The disk is nearly edge-on and has a radius of ~ 60 AU. Interestingly, it shows a prominent equatorial dark lane sandwiched between two brighter features, due to relatively low temperature and high optical depth near the disk midplane. For the first time, this dark lane is seen at submillimeter wavelength, producing a "hamburger"-shaped appearance that is reminiscent of the scattered-light image of an edge-on disk in optical and near infrared. Our observations open up an exciting possibility of directly detecting and characterizing small disks around the youngest protostars through high-resolution imaging with ALMA, which provides strong constraints on theories of disk formation.
  • We introduce a new stacking method in Keplerian disks that (1) enhances signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) of detected molecular lines and (2) that makes visible otherwise undetectable weak lines. Our technique takes advantage of the Keplerian rotational velocity pattern. It aligns spectra according to their different centroid velocities at their different positions in a disk and stacks them. After aligning, the signals are accumulated in a narrower velocity range as compared to the original line width without alignment. Moreover, originally correlated noise becomes de-correlated. Stacked and aligned spectra, thus, have a higher S/N. We apply our method to ALMA archival data of DCN (3-2), DCO+ (3-2), N2D+ (3-2), and H2CO (3_0,3-2_0,2), (3_2,2-2_2,1), and (3_2,1-2_2,0) in the protoplanetary disk around HD 163296. As a result, (1) the S/N of the originally detected DCN (3-2), DCO+ (3-2), and H2CO (3_0,3-2_0,2) and N2D+ (3-2) lines are boosted by a factor of >4-5 at their spectral peaks, implying one order of magnitude shorter integration times to reach the original S/N; and (2) the previously undetectable spectra of the H2CO (3_2,2-2_2,1) and (3_2,1-2_2,0) lines are materialized at more than 3 sigma. These dramatically enhanced S/N allow us to measure intensity distributions in all lines with high significance. The principle of our method can not only be applied to Keplerian disks but also to any systems with ordered kinematic patterns.
  • HH 111 is a Class I protostellar system at a distance of ~ 400 pc, with the central source VLA 1 associated with a rotating disk deeply embedded in a flattened envelope. Here we present the observations of this system at ~ 0.6" (240 AU) resolution in C18O (J=2-1) and 230 GHz continuum obtained with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, and in SO obtained with Submillimeter Array. The observations show for the first time how a Keplerian rotating disk can be formed inside a flattened envelope. The flattened envelope is detected in C18O, extending out to >~ 2400 AU from the VLA 1 source. It has a differential rotation, with the outer part (>~ 2000 AU) better described by a rotation that has constant specific angular momentum and the innermost part (<~ 160 AU) by a Keplerian rotation. The rotationally supported disk is therefore relatively compact in this system, which is consistent with the dust continuum observations. Most interestingly, if the flow is in steady state, there is a substantial drop in specific angular momentum in the envelope-disk transition region from 2000 AU to 160 AU, by a factor of ~ 3. Such a decrease is not expected outside a disk formed from simple hydrodynamic core collapse, but can happen naturally if the core is significantly magnetized, because magnetic fields can be trapped in the transition region outside the disk by the ram pressure of the protostellar accretion flow, which can lead to efficient magnetic braking. In addition, SO shock emission is detected around the outer radius of the disk and could trace an accretion shock around the disk.
  • Recent high-resolution high-sensitivity observations of protostellar jets have shown many to possess deviations to their trajectories. HH 211 is one such example where sub-mm observations with the SMA have revealed a clear reflection-symmetric wiggle. The most likely explanation is that the HH 211 jet source could be moving as part of a protobinary system. Here we test this assumption by simulating HH 211 through 3D hydrodynamic jet propagation simulations using the PLUTO code with a molecular chemistry and cooling module, and initial conditions based on an analytical model derived from SMA observations. Our results show the reflection-symmetric wiggle can be recreated through the assumption of a jet source perturbed by binary motion at its base, and that a regular sinusoidal velocity variation in the jet beam can be close to matching the observed knot pattern. However, a more complex model with either additional heating from the protostar, or a shorter period velocity pulsation may be required to account for enhanced emission near the source, and weaker knot emission downstream. Position velocity diagrams along the pulsed jet beam show a complex structure with detectable signatures of knots and show caution must be exercised when interpreting radial velocity profiles through observations. Finally, we make predictions for future HH 211 observations with ALMA.
  • We have analyzed the HCO+ (1-0) data of the Class I-II protostar, HL Tau, obtained from the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array long baseline campaign. We generated the HCO+ image cube at an angular resolution of ~0.07 (~10 AU), and performed azimuthal averaging on the image cube to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and measure the radial profile of the HCO+ integrated intensity. Two gaps at radii of ~28 AU and ~69 AU and a central cavity are identified in the radial intensity profile. The inner HCO+ gap is coincident with the millimeter continuum gap at a radius of 32 AU. The outer HCO+ gap is located at the millimeter continuum bright ring at a radius of 69 AU and overlaps with the two millimeter continuum gaps at radii of 64 AU and 74 AU. On the contrary, the presence of the central cavity is likely due to the high optical depth of the 3 mm continuum emission and not the depletion of the HCO+ gas. We derived the HCO+ column density profile from its intensity profile. From the column density profile, the full-width-half-maximum widths of the inner and outer HCO+ gaps are both estimated to be ~14 AU, and their depths are estimated to be ~2.4 and ~5.0. These results are consistent with the expectation from the gaps opened by forming (sub-)Jovian mass planets, while placing tight constraints on the theoretical models solely incorporating the variation of dust properties and grain sizes.
  • In order to understand the formation of the multipolar structures of the pre-planetary nebula (PPN) CRL 618, we perform 3D simulations using a multi-directional bullet model. The optical lobes of CRL 618 and fast molecular outflows at the tips of the lobes have been found to have similar expansion ages of ~ 100 yr. Additional fast molecular outflows were found near the source along the outflow axes with ages of ~ 45 yr, suggesting a second episode of bullet ejections. Thus, in our simulations, two episodes of bullet ejections are assumed. The shaping process is simulated using the ZEUS-3D hydrodynamics code that includes molecular and atomic cooling. In addition, molecular chemistry is also included to calculate the CO intensity maps. Our results show the following: (1) Multi-epoch bullets interacting with the toroidal dense core can produce the collimated multiple lobes as seen in CRL 618. The total mass of the bullets is ~ 0.034 solar mass, consistent with the observed high-velocity CO emission in fast molecular outflows. (2) The simulated CO J=3-2 intensity maps show that the low-velocity cavity wall and the high-velocity outflows along the lobes are reasonably consistent with the observations. The position-velocity diagram of the outflows along the outflow axes shows a linear increase of velocity with distance, similar to the observations. The ejections of these bullets could be due to magneto-rotational explosions or nova-like explosions around a binary companion.
  • HH 211 is a highly collimated jet with a chain of well-defined knots, powered by a nearby young Class 0 protostar. We have used 4 epochs (2004, 2008, 2010, and 2013) of Submillimeter Array (SMA) archive data to study the properties of the HH 211 jet in SiO (J=8-7). The jet shows similar reflection-symmetric wiggle structures in all epochs. The wiggle structures can all be fitted by an orbiting jet source model that includes a position shift due to proper motion of the jet, indicating that the wiggle propagates along the jet axis. Thus, this suggests the wiggle is indeed due to an orbital motion of the jet source. Proper motions of the knots are measured by using the peak positions of the knots in four epochs, and they are roughly the same and independent of the distance from the central source. The mean proper motion of the knots is $\sim$ 0.087 arcsec per year, resulting in a transverse velocity of $\sim$ 114 km s$^{-1}$, about 30\% lower than that measured before. Knots BK2 and BK3 have a well-defined linear velocity structure, with the fast jet material upstream to the slow jet material. The gradient of the velocity structure decreases from knot BK2 to BK3. In addition, for each knot, the gradient decreases with time, as the knot propagates away from the central source. These results are both expected if the two knots trace internal shocks produced by a small periodical variation in ejection velocity of the jet.
  • HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) highly collimated protostellar jet powered by a Class 0 source in Orion. We have mapped the inner 80" (~ 0.16 pc) of the jet in SiO (J=8-7) and CO (J=3-2) simultaneously at ~ 0.5 resolution with the Atacama Millimeter/Submillimeter Array at unprecedented sensitivity. The jet consists of a chain of knots, bow shocks, and sinuous structures in between. As compared to that seen in our previous observations with the Submillimeter Array, it appears to be more continuous, especially in the northern part. Some of the knots are now seen associated with small bow shocks, with their bow wings curving back to the jet axis, as seen in pulsed jet simulations. Two of them are reasonably resolved, showing kinematics consistent with sideways ejection, possibly tracing the internal working surfaces formed by a temporal variation in the jet velocity. In addition, nested shells are seen in CO around the jet axis connecting to the knots and bow shocks, driven by them. The proper motion of the jet is estimated to be ~ 115+-50 km/s, comparing to our previous observations. The jet has a small semi-periodical wiggle, with a period of ~ 93 yrs. The amplitude of the wiggle first increases with the distance from the central source and then stays roughly constant. One possible origin of the wiggle could be the kink instability in a magnetized jet.
  • HH 211 is a young Class 0 protostellar system, with a flattened envelope, a possible rotating disk, and a collimated jet. We have mapped it with the Submillimeter Array in 341.6 GHz continuum and SiO J=8-7 at ~ 0.6 resolution. The continuum traces the thermal dust emission in the flattened envelope and the possible disk. Linear polarization is detected in the continuum in the flattened envelope. The field lines implied from the polarization have different orientations, but they are not incompatible with current gravitational collapse models, which predict different orientation depending on the region/distance. Also, we might have detected for the first time polarized SiO line emission in the jet due to the Goldreich-Kylafis effect. Observations at higher sensitivity are needed to determine the field morphology in the jet.
  • We report here our latest search for molecular outflows from young brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars in nearby star-forming regions. We have observed three sources in Taurus with the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy at 230 GHz frequency to search for CO J=2-1 outflows. We obtain a tentative detection of a redshifted and extended gas lobe at about 10 arcsec from the source GM Tau, a young brown dwarf in Taurus with an estimated mass of 73 M_J, which is right below the hydrogen-burning limit. No blueshifted emission around the brown dwarf position is detected. The redshifted gas lobe that is elongated in the northeast direction suggests a possible bipolar outflow from the source with a position angle of about 36 degrees. Assuming that the redshifted emission is outflow emission from GM Tau, we then estimate a molecular outflow mass in the range from 1.9x10^-6 M_Sun to 2.9x10^-5 M_Sun and an outflow mass-loss rate from 2.7x10^-9 M_Sun yr^-1 to 4.1x10^-8 M_Sun yr^-1. These values are comparable to those we have observed in the young brown dwarf ISO-Oph 102 of 60 M_J in rho Ophiuchi and the very low-mass star MHO 5 of 90 M_J in Taurus. Our results suggest that the outflow process in very low-mass objects is episodic with duration of a few thousand years and the outflow rate of active episodes does not significantly change for different stages of the formation process of very low-mass objects. This may provide us with important implications that clarify the formation process of brown dwarfs.
  • HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system showing several components that can be compared with theoretical models of core collapse. We have mapped it in 350 GHz continuum and HCO+ J=4-3 emission with ALMA at up to ~ 0.4" resolution. A flattened envelope and a compact disk are seen in continuum around the central source, as seen before. The HCO+ kinematics shows that the flattened envelope is infalling with small rotation (i.e., spiraling) into the central source, and thus can be identified as a pseudodisk in the models of magnetized core collapse. Also, the HCO+ kinematics shows that the disk is rotating and can be rotationally supported. In addition, to account for the missing HCO+ emission at low-redshifted velocity, an extended infalling envelope is required, with its material flowing roughly parallel to the jet axis toward the pseudodisk. This is expected if it is magnetized with an hourglass B-field morphology. We have modeled the continuum and HCO+ emission of the flattened envelope and disk simultaneously. We find that a jump in density is required across the interface between the pseudodisk and the disk. A jet is seen in HCO+ extending out to ~ 500 AU away from the central source, with the peaks upstream of those seen before in SiO. The broad velocity range and high HCO+ abundance indicate that the HCO+ emission traces internal shocks in the jet.
  • The molecular outflow from IRAS 04166+2706 was mapped with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 350 GHz continuum and CO J = 3$-$2 at an angular resolution of ~1 arcsec. The field of view covers the central arc-minute, which contains the inner four pairs of knots of the molecular jet. On the channel map, conical structures are clearly present in the low velocity range (|V$-$V$_0$|$<$10 km s$^{-1}$), and the highly collimated knots appear in the Extremely High Velocity range (EHV, 50$>$|V$-$V$_0$|$>$30 km s$^{-1}$). The higher angular resolution of ~1 arcsec reveals the first blue-shifted knot (B1) that was missing in previous PdBI observation of Sant\'iago-Garc\'ia et al. (2009) at an offset of ~6 arcsec to the North-East of the central source. This identification completes the symmetric sequence of knots in both the blue- and red-shifted lobes of the outflow. The innermost knots R1 and B1 have the highest velocities within the sequence. Although the general features appear to be similar to previous CO J = 2$-$1 images in Sant\'iago-Garc\'ia et al. (2009), the emission in CO J = 3$-$2 almost always peaks further away from the central source than that of CO J = 2$-$1 in the red-shifted lobe of the channel maps. This gives rise to a gradient in the line-ratio map of CO J = 3$-$2/J = 2$-$1 from head to tail within a knot. A large velocity gradient (LVG) analysis suggests that the differences may reflect a higher gas kinetic temperature at the head. We also explore possible constraints imposed by the non-detection of SiO J = 8$-$7.
  • CRL 618 is a well-studied pre-planetary nebula. It has multiple highly collimated optical lobes, fast molecular outflows along the optical lobes, and an extended molecular envelope that consists of a dense torus in the equator and a tenuous round halo. Here we present our observations of this source in CO J=3-2 and HCN J=4-3 obtained with the Submillimeter Array at up to ~ 0.3" resolutions. We spatially resolve the fast molecular-outflow region previously detected in CO near the central star and find it to be composed of multiple outflows that have similar dynamical ages, and are oriented along the different optical lobes. We also detect fast molecular outflows further away from the central star near the tips of the extended optical lobes and a pair of equatorial outflows inside the dense torus. We find that two episodes of bullet ejections in different directions are needed, one producing the fast molecular outflows near the central star, and one producing the fast molecular outflows near the tips of the extended optical lobes. One possibility to launch these bullets is the magneto-rotational explosion of the stellar envelope.
  • CRL 618 is a well-studied pre-planetary nebula. We have mapped its central region in continuum and molecular lines with the Submillimeter Array at 350 GHz at ~ 0.3" to 0.5" resolutions. Two components are seen in 350 GHz continuum: (1) a compact emission at the center tracing the dense inner part of the H II region previously detected in 23 GHz continuum and it may trace a fast ionized wind at the base, and (2) an extended thermal dust emission surrounding the H II region, tracing the dense core previously detected in HC3N at the center of the circumstellar envelope. The dense core is dusty and may contain mm-sized dust grains. It may have a density enhancement in the equatorial plane. It is also detected in carbon chain molecules HC3N and HCN, and their isotopologues, with higher excitation lines tracing closer to the central star. It is also detected in C2H3CN toward the innermost part. Most of the emission detected here arises within ~ 630 AU (~0.7") from the central star. A simple radiative transfer model is used to derive the kinematics, physical conditions, and the chemical abundances in the dense core. The dense core is expanding and accelerating, with the velocity increasing roughly linearly from ~ 3 km/s in the innermost part to ~ 16 km/s at 630 AU. The mass-loss rate in the dense core is extremely high with a value of ~ 1.15x10^{-3} solar mass per year. The dense core has a mass of ~ 0.47 solar mass and a dynamical age of ~ 400 yrs. It could result from a recent enhanced heavy mass-loss episode that ends the AGB phase. The isotopic ratios of 12C/13C and 14N/15N are 9$\pm$4 and 150$\pm50$, respectively, both lower than the solar values.
  • Recently, the CO J=3-2 observational result of the envelope of the 21 micrometer PPN IRAS 07134+1005 has been reported. Assuming that the CO J=3-2 line was optically thin, the mass-loss rate of the superwind in this PPN was found to be at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than the typical range. In order to obtain a more accurate mass-loss rate, we reexamine this data and construct a radiative transfer model to compare with the data. Also, in order to better resolve the superwind, we adopt a different weighting on the data to obtain maps at higher resolution. Our result shows that the CO J=3-2 emission is located slightly further away from the central source than the mid-IR emission, probably because that the material is cooler in the outer part and thus better traced by the CO emission. At lower resolution, however, the CO emission appeared to be spatially coincident with the mid-IR emission. Our model has two components, an inner ellipsoidal shell-like superwind with an equatorial density enhancement and an outer spheroidal AGB wind. The thick torus in previous model could be considered as the dense equatorial part of our ellipsoidal superwind. With radiative transfer, our model reproduces more observed features than previous model and obtains an averaged superwind mass-loss rate of ~ 1.8 x 10^-5 solar mass per year, which is typical for a superwind. The mass-loss rate in the equatorial plane is 3 x 10^-5 solar mass per year, also the same as that derived before from modeling CO J=1-0 emission.
  • The HH 111 protostellar system is a young Class I system with two sources, VLA 1 and VLA 2, at a distance of 400 pc. Previously, a flattened envelope has been seen in C18O to be in transition to a rotationally supported disk near the VLA 1 source. The follow-up study here is to confirm the rotationally supported disk at 2-3 times higher angular resolutions, at ~ 0.3" (or 120 AU) in 1.33 mm continuum, and ~ 0.6" (or 240 AU) in 13CO (J=2-1) and 12CO (J=2-1) emission obtained with the Submillimeter Array. The 1.33 mm continuum emission shows a resolved dusty disk associated with the VLA 1 source perpendicular to the jet axis, with a Gaussian deconvolved size of ~ 240 AU. The 13CO and 12CO emissions toward the dusty disk show a Keplerian rotation, indicating that the dusty disk is rotationally supported. The density and temperature distributions in the disk derived from a simple disk model are found to be similar to those found in bright T-Tauri disks, suggesting that the disk can evolve into a T-Tauri disk in the late stage of star formation. In addition, a hint of a low-velocity molecular outflow is also seen in 13CO and 12CO coming out from the disk.