• We introduce a new method for performing robust Bayesian estimation of the three-dimensional spatial power spectrum at the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), from interferometric observations. The versatility of this technique allows us to present two approaches. First, when the observations span only a small number of independent spatial frequencies ($k$-modes) we sample directly from the spherical power spectrum coefficients that describe the EoR signal realisation. Second, when the number of $k$-modes to be included in the model becomes large, we sample from the joint probability density of the spherical power spectrum and the signal coefficients, using Hamiltonian Monte Carlo methods to explore this high dimensional ($\sim$ 20000) space efficiently. This approach has been successfully applied to simulated observations that include astrophysically realistic foregrounds in a companion publication (Sims et al. 2016). Here we focus on explaining the methodology in detail, and use simple foreground models to both demonstrate its efficacy, and highlight salient features. In particular, we show that including an arbitrary flat spectrum continuum foreground that is $10^8$ times greater in power than the EoR signal has no detectable impact on our parameter estimates of the EoR power spectrum recovered from the data.
  • Detecting neutral Hydrogen (H\,{\sc i}) via the 21~cm line emission from the intergalactic medium at $z\gtrsim 6$ has been identified as one of the most promising probes of the epoch of cosmic reionization -- a major phase transition of the Universe. However, these studies face severe challenges imposed by the bright foreground emission from cosmic objects. Current techniques require precise instrumental calibration to separate the weak H\,{\sc i} line signal from the foreground continuum emission. We propose to mitigate this calibration requirement by using measurements of the interferometric bi-spectrum phase. Bi-spectrum phase is unaffected by antenna-based direction-independent calibration errors and hence for a compact array it depends on the sky brightness distribution only (subject to the usual thermal-like noise). We show that the bi-spectrum phase of foreground synchrotron continuum has a characteristically smooth spectrum relative to the cosmological line signal. The two can be separated effectively by exploiting this spectral difference using Fourier techniques, while eliminating the need for precise antenna-based calibration of phases introduced by the instrument, and the ionosphere, inherent in existing approaches. Using fiducial models for continuum foregrounds, and for the cosmological H\,{\sc i} signal, we show the latter should be detectable in bi-spectrum phase spectra, with reasonable significance at $|k_\parallel| \gtrsim 0.5\,h$~Mpc$^{-1}$, using existing instruments. Our approach will also benefit other H\,{\sc i} intensity mapping experiments that face similar challenges, such as those measuring Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO).
  • We use 2.0 Msec of Chandra observations to investigate the cocoon shocks of Cygnus A and some implications for its lobes and jet. Measured shock Mach numbers vary in the range 1.18-1.66 around the cocoon. We estimate a total outburst energy of $\simeq 4.7\times10^{60}\rm\ erg$, with an age of $\simeq 2 \times 10^{7}\rm\ yr$. The average postshock pressure is found to be $8.6 \pm 0.3 \times 10^{-10}\rm\ erg\ cm^{-3}$, which agrees with the average pressure of the thin rim of compressed gas between the radio lobes and shocks, as determined from X-ray spectra. However, average rim pressures are found to be lower in the western lobe than in the eastern lobe by $\simeq 20\%$. Pressure estimates for hotspots A and D from synchrotron self-Compton models imply that each jet exerts a ram pressure $\gtrsim$ 3 times its static pressure, consistent with the positions of the hotspots moving about on the cocoon shock over time. A steady, one-dimensional flow model is used to estimate jet properties, finding mildly relativistic flow speeds within the allowed parameter range. Models in which the jet carries a negligible flux of rest mass are consistent with with the observed properties of the jets and hotspots. This favors the jets being light, implying that the kinetic power and momentum flux are carried primarily by the internal energy of the jet plasma rather than by its rest mass.
  • We present a survey of the [CII] 158 $\mu$m line and underlying far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission in a sample of 27 z>6 quasars using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at ~1" resolution. The [CII] line was significantly detected (at >5-sigma) in 23 sources (85%). We find typical line luminosities of $L_{\rm [CII]}=10^{9-10}$ L$_\odot$, and an average line width of ~385 km/s. The [CII]-to-far-infrared luminosity ratio ([CII]/FIR) in our sources span one order of magnitude, highlighting a variety of conditions in the star-forming medium. Four quasar host galaxies are clearly resolved in their [CII] emission on a few kpc scales. Basic estimates of the dynamical masses of the host galaxies give masses between $2\times10^{10}$ and $2\times10^{11}$ M$_\odot$, i.e., more than an order of magnitude below what is expected from local scaling relations, given the available limits on the masses of the central black holes ($>3\times10^8$ M$_\odot$, assuming Eddington-limited accretion). In stacked ALMA [CII] spectra of individual sources in our sample, we find no evidence of a deviation from a single Gaussian profile. The quasar luminosity does not strongly correlate with either the [CII] luminosity or equivalent width. This survey (with typical on-source integration times of 8 min) showcases the unparalleled sensitivity of ALMA at millimeter wavelengths, and offers a unique reference sample for the study of the first massive galaxies in the universe.
  • Observations of the 21 cm Epoch of Reionization (EoR) signal are dominated by Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds. The need for foreground removal has led to the development of two main techniques, often referred to as "foreground avoidance" and "foreground subtraction". Avoidance is associated with filtering foregrounds in Fourier space, while subtraction uses an explicit foreground model that is removed. Using 1088 hours of data from the 64-element PAPER array, we demonstrate that the techniques can be combined to produce a result that is an improvement over either method independently. Relative to either technique on its own, our approach is shown to decrease the amount of foreground contamination due to band-limited spectral leakage in EoR power spectrum $k$-modes of interest for all redshifts. In comparison to just filtering alone, at $k=0.1 \ h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ we obtain a 6% sensitivity improvement at redshift z = 8.4 (middle of observing band) and with the proper choice of window function a 12% improvement at $z = 7.4$ and 24% at $ z = 10.4$ (band edges). We also demonstrate these effects using a smaller 3 hour sampling of data from the MWA, and find that the hybrid filtering and subtraction removal approach provides similar improvements across the band as seen in the case with PAPER-64.
  • HERA is a highly-redundant transit interferometer with 14\,m-diameter parabolic dish elements. We exploit the fact that the Galactic centre transits through the main beam of the telescope to attempt a conventional self-calibration approach to imaging and calibration. The Galactic centre provides a bright source which, we show, can be approximated as a point source sufficiently well to initialise the self-calibration loop and derive initial delays and antenna frequency-independent phases. Subsequent iteration using a more complex sky model derived from the data itself then converges to a reasonable bandpass calibration. The calibration solutions have good stability properties. We show therefore that the conventional self-calibration is a feasible parallel approach in addition to the redundant calibration already planned for HERA. The conventional imaging and calibration is useful as a cross-check to the alternatives being pursued in the HERA project, as a way of quantifying the performance of the hardware on the ground (and potentially identifying problems) and as a route to imaging and removing brighter continuum sources before power spectrum analysis.
  • The existence of massive ($10^{11}$ solar masses) elliptical galaxies by redshift z~4 (when the Universe was 1.5 billion years old) necessitates the presence of galaxies with star-formation rates exceeding 100 solar masses per year at z>6 (corresponding to an age of the Universe of less than 1 billion years). Surveys have discovered hundreds of galaxies at these early cosmic epochs, but their star-formation rates are more than an order of magnitude lower. The only known galaxies with very high star-formation rates at z>6 are, with only one exception, the host galaxies of quasars, but these galaxies also host accreting supermassive (more than $10^9$ solar masses) black holes, which probably affect the properties of the galaxies. Here we report observations of an emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII] at a wavelength of 158 micrometres) in four galaxies at z>6 that are companions of quasars, with velocity offsets of less than 600 kilometers per second and linear offsets of less than 600 kiloparsecs. The discovery of these four galaxies was serendipitous; they are close to their companion quasars and appear bright in the far-infrared. On the basis of the [CII] measurements, we estimate star-formation rates in the companions of more than 100 solar masses per year. These sources are similar to the host galaxies of the quasars in [CII] brightness, linewidth and implied dynamical masses, but do not show evidence for accreting supermassive black holes. Similar systems have previously been found at lower redshift. We find such close companions in four out of twenty-five z>6 quasars surveyed, a fraction that needs to be accounted for in simulations. If they are representative of the bright end of the [CII] luminosity function, then they can account for the population of massive elliptical galaxies at z~4 in terms of cosmic space density.
  • We report observations of dense molecular gas in the star-forming galaxy EGS 13004291 (z=1.197) using the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We tentatively detect HCN and HNC (J=2-1) emission when stacked together at ~4sigma significance, yielding line luminosities of L_HCN (J=2-1) =(9 +/- 3) x 10^9 K km s^-1 pc^2 and L_HNC (J=2-1)= (5 +/-2) x 10^9 K km s^-1 pc^2 respectively. We also set 3sigma upper limits of < 7-8 x 10^9 K km s^-1 pc^2 on the HCO+, H2O (3_13-2_20) and HC3N (J=20-19) line luminosities. We serendipitously detect CO emission from two sources at z~1.8 and z~3.2 in the same field of view. We also detect CO(J=2-1) emission in EGS 13004291, showing that the excitation in the previously detected CO(J=3-2) line is subthermal (r_32=0.65 +/- 0.15). We find a line luminosity ratio of L_HCN/L_CO=0.17 +/- 0.07 , as an indicator of the dense gas fraction. This is consistent with the median ratio observed in z>1 galaxies (L_HCN/L_CO=0.16 +/- 0.07) and nearby ULIRGs (L_HCN/L_CO=0.13 +/- 0.03), but higher than in local spirals (L_HCN/L_CO=0.04 +/- 0.02). Although EGS 13004291 lies significantly above the galaxy main sequence at z~1, we do not find an elevated star formation efficiency (traced by L_FIR/L_CO) as in local starbursts, but a value consistent with main-sequence galaxies. The enhanced dense gas fraction, the subthermal gas excitation, and the lower than expected star formation efficiency of the dense molecular gas in EGS 13004291 suggest that different star formation properties may prevail in high-z starbursts. Thus, using L_FIR/L_CO as a simple recipe to measure the star formation efficiency may be insufficient to describe the underlying mechanisms in dense star-forming environments inside the large gas reservoirs.
  • Polarized foreground emission is a potential contaminant of attempts to measure the fluctuation power spectrum of highly redshifted 21 cm HI emission from the epoch of reionization. Using the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), we present limits on the observed power spectra of all four Stokes parameters in two frequency bands, centered at 126 MHz ($z=10.3$) and 164 MHz ($z=7.66$) for a three-month observing campaign of a 32-antenna deployment, for which unpolarized power spectrum results have been reported at $z=7.7$ (Parsons et al 2014) and $7.5 < z < 10.5$ (Jacobs et al 2014). The power spectra in this paper are processed in the same way as in those works, and show no definitive detection of polarized power. This non-detection appears to be largely due to the suppression of polarized power by ionospheric rotation measure fluctuations, which strongly affect Stokes Q and U. We are able to show that the net effect of polarized leakage is a negligible contribution at the levels of of the limits reported in Parsons et al 2014 and Jacobs et al 2014.
  • We present the results of ALMA spectroscopic follow-up of a $z=6.765$ Lyman-$\alpha$ emitting galaxy behind the cluster RXJ1347-1145. We report the detection of [CII]158$\mu$m line fully consistent with the Lyman-$\alpha$ redshift and with the peak of the optical emission. Given the magnification of $\mu=5.0 \pm 0.3$ the intrinsic (corrected for lensing) luminosity of the [CII] line is $L_{[CII]} =1.4^{+0.2}_{-0.3} \times 10^7L_{\odot}$, which is ${\sim}5$ times fainter than other detections of $z\sim 7$ galaxies. The result indicates that low $L_{[CII]}$ in $z\sim 7$ galaxies compared to the local counterparts might be caused by their low metallicities and/or feedback. The small velocity off-set ($\Delta v = 20_{-40}^{+140} \rm km/s$) between the Lyman-$\alpha$ and [CII] line is unusual, and may be indicative of ionizing photons escaping.
  • In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the {\em Hubble} Ultra Deep Field (UDF) in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to $z\sim 4.5$. This study is based on galaxies that have been solely selected through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted `knee' of the CO luminosity function (around $5\times10^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to $z\sim 0$, with more CO luminous galaxies present at $z\sim 2$. The observed galaxies at $z\sim 2$ also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a factor 3-10 drop from $z \sim 2$ to $z \sim 0$ (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at $z>3$. This trend is similar to the observed evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density. The latter therefore appears to be at least partly driven by the increased availability of molecular gas reservoirs at the peak of cosmic star formation ($z\sim2$).
  • We study the molecular gas properties of high-$z$ galaxies observed in the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey (ASPECS) that targets a $\sim1$ arcmin$^2$ region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), a blind survey of CO emission (tracing molecular gas) in the 3mm and 1mm bands. Of a total of 1302 galaxies in the field, 56 have spectroscopic redshifts and correspondingly well-defined physical properties. Among these, 11 have infrared luminosities $L_{\rm{}IR}>10^{11}$ L$_\odot$, i.e. a detection in CO emission was expected. Out these, 7 are detected at various significance in CO, and 4 are undetected in CO emission. In the CO-detected sources, we find CO excitation conditions that are lower than typically found in starburst/SMG/QSO environments. We use the CO luminosities (including limits for non-detections) to derive molecular gas masses. We discuss our findings in context of previous molecular gas observations at high redshift (star-formation law, gas depletion times, gas fractions): The CO-detected galaxies in the UDF tend to reside on the low-$L_{\rm{}IR}$ envelope of the scatter in the $L_{\rm{}IR}-L'_{\rm{}CO}$ relation, but exceptions exist. For the CO-detected sources, we find an average depletion time of $\sim$ 1 Gyr, with significant scatter. The average molecular-to-stellar mass ratio ($M_{\rm{}H2}$/$M_*$) is consistent with earlier measurements of main sequence galaxies at these redshifts, and again shows large variations among sources. In some cases, we also measure dust continuum emission. On average, the dust-based estimates of the molecular gas are a factor $\sim$2-5$\times$ smaller than those based on CO. Accounting for detections as well as non-detections, we find large diversity in the molecular gas properties of the high-redshift galaxies covered by ASPECS.
  • We make use of deep 1.2mm-continuum observations (12.7microJy/beam RMS) of a 1 arcmin^2 region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to probe dust-enshrouded star formation from 330 Lyman-break galaxies spanning the redshift range z=2-10 (to ~2-3 Msol/yr at 1sigma over the entire range). Given the depth and area of ASPECS, we would expect to tentatively detect 35 galaxies extrapolating the Meurer z~0 IRX-beta relation to z>~2 (assuming T_d~35 K). However, only 6 tentative detections are found at z>~2 in ASPECS, with just three at >3sigma. Subdividing z=2-10 galaxies according to stellar mass, UV luminosity, and UV-continuum slope and stacking the results, we only find a significant detection in the most massive (>10^9.75 Msol) subsample, with an infrared excess (IRX=L_{IR}/L_{UV}) consistent with previous z~2 results. However, the infrared excess we measure from our large selection of sub-L* (<10^9.75 Msol) galaxies is 0.11(-0.42)(+0.32) and 0.14(-0.14)(+0.15) at z=2-3 and z=4-10, respectively, lying below even an SMC IRX-beta relation (95% confidence). These results demonstrate the relevance of stellar mass for predicting the IR luminosity of z>~2 galaxies. We furthermore find that the evolution of the IRX-stellar mass relationship depends on the evolution of the dust temperature. If the dust temperature increases monotonically with redshift (as (1+z)^0.32) such that T_d~44-50 K at z>=4, current results are suggestive of little evolution in this relationship to z~6. We use these results to revisit recent estimates of the z>~3 SFR density. One less obvious implication is in interpreting the high Halpha EWs seen in z~5 galaxies: our results imply that star-forming galaxies produce Lyman-continuum photons at twice the efficiency (per unit UV luminosity) as implied in conventional models. Star-forming galaxies can then reionize the Universe, even if the escape fraction is <10%.
  • We present the rationale for and the observational description of ASPECS: The ALMA SPECtroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF), the cosmological deep field that has the deepest multi-wavelength data available. Our overarching goal is to obtain an unbiased census of molecular gas and dust continuum emission in high-redshift (z$>$0.5) galaxies. The $\sim$1$'$ region covered within the UDF was chosen to overlap with the deepest available imaging from HST. Our ALMA observations consist of full frequency scans in band 3 (84-115 GHz) and band 6 (212-272 GHz) at approximately uniform line sensitivity ($L'_{\rm CO}\sim$2$\times$10$^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$), and continuum noise levels of 3.8 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ and 12.7 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$, respectively. The molecular surveys cover the different rotational transitions of the CO molecule, leading to essentially full redshift coverage. The [CII] emission line is also covered at redshifts $6.0<z<8.0$. We present a customized algorithm to identify line candidates in the molecular line scans, and quantify our ability to recover artificial sources from our data. Based on whether multiple CO lines are detected, and whether optical spectroscopic redshifts as well as optical counterparts exist, we constrain the most likely line identification. We report 10 (11) CO line candidates in the 3mm (1mm) band, and our statistical analysis shows that $<$4 of these (in each band) are likely spurious. Less than 1/3 of the total CO flux in the low-J CO line candidates are from sources that are not associated with an optical/NIR counterpart. We also present continuum maps of both the band 3 and band 6 observations. The data presented here form the basis of a number of dedicated studies that are presented in subsequent papers.
  • The Next-Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) will be critical for understanding how galaxies are built and evolve at the earliest epochs. The sensitivity and frequency coverage will allow for the detection of cold gas and dust in `normal' distant galaxies, including the low-J transitions of molecular gas tracers such as CO, HNC, and HCO+; synchrotron and free-free continuum emission; and even the exciting possibility of thermal dust emission at the highest (z~7) redshifts. In particular, by enabling the total molecular gas reservoirs to be traced to unprecedented sensitivities across a huge range of epochs simultaneously -- something no other radio or submillimeter facility will be capable of -- the detection of the crucial low-J transitions of CO in a diverse body of galaxies will be the cornerstone of ngVLA's contribution to high-redshift galaxy evolution science. The ultra-wide bandwidths will allow a complete sampling of radio SEDs, as well as the detection of emission lines necessary for spectroscopic confirmation of elusive dusty starbursts. The ngVLA will also deliver unique contributions to our understanding of cosmic magnetism and to science accessible through microwave polarimetry. Finally, the superb angular resolution will move the field beyond detection experiments and allow detailed studies of the morphology and dynamics of these systems, including dynamical modeling of disks/mergers, determining the properties of outflows, measuring black hole masses from gas disks, and resolving multiple AGN nuclei. We explore the contribution of a ngVLA to these areas and more, as well as synergies with current and upcoming facilities including ALMA, SKA, large single-dish submillimeter observatories, GMT/TMT, and JWST.
  • This paper discusses compelling science cases for a future long-baseline interferometer operating at millimeter and centimeter wavelengths, like the proposed Next Generation Vary Large Array (ngVLA). We report on the activities of the Cradle of Life science working group, which focused on the formation of low- and high-mass stars, the formation of planets and evolution of protoplanetary disks, the physical and compositional study of Solar System bodies, and the possible detection of radio signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. We propose 19 scientific projects based on the current specification of the ngVLA. Five of them are highlighted as possible Key Science Projects: (1) Resolving the density structure and dynamics of the youngest HII regions and high-mass protostellar jets, (2) Unveiling binary/multiple protostars at higher resolution, (3) Mapping planet formation regions in nearby disks on scales down to 1 AU, (4) Studying the formation of complex molecules, and (5) Deep atmospheric mapping of giant planets in the Solar System. For each of these projects, we discuss the scientific importance and feasibility. The results presented here should be considered as the beginning of a more in-depth analysis of the science enabled by such a facility, and are by no means complete or exhaustive.
  • A new Bayesian method for performing an image domain search for line-emitting galaxies is presented. The method uses both spatial and spectral information to robustly determine the source properties, employing either simple Gaussian, or other physically motivated models whilst using the evidence to determine the probability that the source is real. In this paper, we describe the method, and its application to both a simulated data set, and a blind survey for cold molecular gas using observations of the Hubble Deep Field North taken with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We make a total of 6 robust detections in the survey, 5 of which have counterparts in other observing bands. We identify the most secure detections found in a previous investigation, while finding one new probable line source with an optical ID not seen in the previous analysis. This study acts as a pilot application of Bayesian statistics to future searches to be carried out both for low-$J$ CO transitions of high redshift galaxies using the JVLA, and at millimeter wavelengths with ALMA, enabling the inference of robust scientific conclusions about the history of the molecular gas properties of star-forming galaxies in the Universe through cosmic time.
  • We measure the dust and gas content of the three sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the GN20 proto-cluster at $z=4.05$ using new IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) CO(4-3) and 1.2-3.3 mm continuum observations. All these three SMGs are heavily dust obscured, with UV-based star formation rate (SFR) estimates significantly smaller than the ones derived from the bolometric infrared (IR), consistent with the spatial offsets revealed by HST and CO imaging. Based also on evaluations of the specific SFR, CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor and gas depletion timescale, we classify all the three galaxies as starbursts (SBs), although with a lower confidence for GN20.2b that might be a later stage merging event. We place our measurements in the context of the evolutionary properties of main sequence (MS) and SB galaxies. ULIRGs have 3-5 times larger $L'_{\rm CO}/M_{\rm dust}$ and $M_{\rm dust}/M_\star$ ratios than $z=0$ MS galaxies, but by $z\sim2$ the difference appears to be blurred, probably due to differential metallicity evolution. SB galaxies appear to slowly evolve in their $L'_{\rm CO}/M_{\rm dust}$ and $M_{\rm dust}/M_\star$ ratios all the way to $z>6$ (consistent with rapid enrichment of SB events), while MS galaxies rapidly increase in $M_{\rm dust}/M_\star$ from $z=0$ to 2 (due to gas fraction increase, compensated by a decrease of metallicities). While no IR/submm continuum detection is available for indisputably normal massive galaxies at $z>2.5$, we show that if metallicity indeed decrease rapidly for these systems at $z>3$ as claimed in the literature, we should expect a strong decrease of their $M_{\rm dust}/M_\star$, consistent with recent PdBI and ALMA upper limits. We conclude that the $M_{\rm dust}/M_\star$ ratio could be a powerful tool for distinguishing starbursts from normal galaxies at $z>4$.
  • We report on two regularly rotating galaxies at redshift z=2, using high resolution spectra of the bright [CII] 158 micron emission line from the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. Both SDSS090122.37+181432.3 ("S0901") and SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 ("the Clone") are strongly lensed and show the double-horned line profile that is typical of rotating gas disks. Using a parametric disk model to fit the emission line profiles, we find that S0901 has a rotation speed v sin(i) = 120 +/- 7 km/s and gas velocity dispersion sigma < 23 km/s. The best fitting model for the Clone is a rotationally supported disk having v sin(i) = 79 +/- 11 km/s and sigma < 4km/s. However the Clone is also consistent with a family of dispersion-dominated models having sigma = 92 +/- 20 km/s. Our results showcase the potential of the [CII] line as a kinematic probe of high redshift galaxy dynamics: [CII] is bright; accessible to heterodyne receivers with exquisite velocity resolution; and traces dense star-forming interstellar gas. Future [CII] line observations with ALMA would offer the further advantage of spatial resolution, allowing a clearer separation between rotation and velocity dispersion.
  • Over the last decade, observations of the cool interstellar medium in distant galaxies via molecular and atomic fine structure line emission has gone from a curious look into a few extreme, rare objects, to a mainstream tool to study galaxy formation, out to the highest redshifts. Molecular gas has now been observed in close to 200 galaxies at z>1, including numerous AGN host-galaxies out to z~7, highly starforming sub-millimeter galaxies (median redshift z~2.5), and increasing samples of 'main-sequence' star forming galaxies at z~1.5-2.5. Studies have moved well beyond simple detections, to dynamical imaging at kpc-scale resolution, and multi-line, multi-species studies that determine the physical conditions in the interstellar medium. Observations of the cool gas are the required complement to studies of the stellar density and star formation history of the Universe, as they reveal the phase of the interstellar medium that immediately precedes star formation. Current observations suggest that the order of magnitude increase in the cosmic star formation rate density from z~0 to 2 is commensurate with a similar increase in the gas to stellar mass ratio in star forming disk galaxies. Progress has been made on determining the CO luminosity to H_2 mass conversion factor at high-z, and the dichotomy between high versus low depletion time values for main sequence versus starburst galaxies, respectively, with a likely dependence on metallicity and other local physical conditions. Studies of atomic fine structure line emission are rapidly progressing, with some tens of galaxies detected in the exceptionally bright [CII] 158 micron line to date. This line is proving to be a unique tracer of galaxy dynamics in the early Universe and has the potential to be the most direct means of obtaining spectroscopic redshifts for the first galaxies during cosmic reionization.
  • An international consortium is presently constructing a beamformer for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile that will be available as a facility instrument. The beamformer will aggregate the entire collecting area of the array into a single, very large aperture. The extraordinary sensitivity of phased ALMA, combined with the extremely fine angular resolution available on baselines to the Northern Hemisphere, will enable transformational new very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations in Bands 6 and 7 (1.3 and 0.8 mm) and provide substantial improvements to existing VLBI arrays in Bands 1 and 3 (7 and 3 mm). The ALMA beamformer will have impact on a variety of scientific topics, including accretion and outflow processes around black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN), tests of general relativity near black holes, jet launch and collimation from AGN and microquasars, pulsar and magnetar emission processes, the chemical history of the universe and the evolution of fundamental constants across cosmic time, maser science, and astrometry.
  • In order to understand galaxy evolution through cosmic times it is critical to derive the properties of the molecular gas content of galaxies, i.e. the material out of which stars ultimately form. The last decade has seen rapid progress in this area, with the detection of massive molecular gas reservoirs at high redshifts in submillimeter-selected galaxies and quasars. In the latter case, molecular gas reservoirs have been quantified out to redshifts z>6, i.e. towards the end of cosmic reionization when the universe was less than one Gyr old. The recent discovery of molecular gas in more normal galaxies have extended these studies from the most extreme objects in the universe (SFR~1000M_sun/yr; quasars and submillimeter galaxies) to more 'normal' starforming systems at redshifts 1.5-2.5 (with SFR~100M_sun/yr). However, detecting the molecular gas reservoirs of high-redshift galaxies that only have moderate star formation rates (~<10 M_sun/yr, similar to the faint galaxies seen in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field) will likely have to await the completion of ALMA.
  • Massive clusters of galaxies have been found as early as 3.9 Billion years (z=1.62) after the Big Bang containing stars that formed at even earlier epochs. Cosmological simulations using the current cold dark matter paradigm predict these systems should descend from "proto-clusters" - early over-densities of massive galaxies that merge hierarchically to form a cluster. These proto-cluster regions themselves are built-up hierarchically and so are expected to contain extremely massive galaxies which can be observed as luminous quasars and starbursts. However, observational evidence for this scenario is sparse due to the fact that high-redshift proto-clusters are rare and difficult to observe. Here we report a proto-cluster region 1 billion years (z=5.3) after the Big Bang. This cluster of massive galaxies extends over >13 Mega-parsecs, contains a luminous quasar as well as a system rich in molecular gas. These massive galaxies place a lower limit of >4x10^11 solar masses of dark and luminous matter in this region consistent with that expected from cosmological simulations for the earliest galaxy clusters.
  • We explore the evolution of the specific star formation rate (SSFR) for 3.6um-selected galaxies of different M_* in the COSMOS field. The average SFR for sub-sets of these galaxies is estimated with stacked 1.4GHz radio continuum emission. We separately consider the total sample and a subset of galaxies (SF) that shows evidence for substantive recent star formation in the rest-frame optical SED. At 0.2<z<3 both populations show a strong and M_*-independent decrease in their SSFR towards z=0.2, best described by a power- law (1+z)^n, where n~4.3 for all galaxies and n~3.5 for SF sources. The decrease appears to have started at z>2, at least above 4x10^10M_Sun where our conclusions are most robust. We find a tight correlation with power-law dependence, SSFR (M_*)^beta, between SSFR and M_* at all z. It tends to flatten below ~10^10M_Sun if quiescent galaxies are included; if they are excluded a shallow index beta_SFG -0.4 fits the correlation. On average, higher M_* objects always have lower SSFRs, also among SF galaxies. At z>1.5 there is tentative evidence for an upper SSFR-limit that an average galaxy cannot exceed. It is suggested by a flattening of the SSFR-M_* relation (also for SF sources), but affects massive (>10^10M_Sun) galaxies only at the highest z. Below z=1.5 there thus is no direct evidence that galaxies of higher M_* experience a more rapid waning of their SSFR than lower M_* SF systems. In this sense, the data rule out any strong 'downsizing'. We combine our results with recent measurements of the galaxy (stellar) mass function in order to determine the characteristic mass of a SF galaxy (M_*=10^(10.6\pm0.4)M_Sun). In this sense, too, there is no 'downsizing'. Our analysis constitutes the most extensive SFR density determination with a single technique to z=3. Recent Herschel results are consistent with our results, but rely on far smaller samples.
  • We present results from a sensitive search for CO J=1-0 line emission in two z> 6.5 Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) with the Green Bank Telescope. CO J=1-0 emission was not detected from either object. For HCM 6A, at z ~ 6.56, the lensing magnification factor of ~4.5 implies that the CO non-detection yields stringent constraints on the CO J=1-0 line luminosity and molecular gas mass of the LAE, L'(CO) < 6.1x10^9 x (dV/300)^(1/2) K km/s pc^2 and M(H_2) < 4.9x10^9 x (dV/300)^(1/2) x (X(CO)/0.8) Msun. These are the strongest limits obtained so far for a z >~ 6 galaxy. For IOK-1, the constraints are somewhat less sensitive, L'(CO) < 2.3x10^10 x (dV/300)^(1/2) K km/s pc^2 and M(H_2) < 1.9x10^10 x (dV/300)^(1/2) x (X(CO)/0.8) Msun. The non-detection of CO J=1-0 emission in HCM~6A, whose high estimated star formation rate, dust extinction, and lensing magnification make it one of the best high-z LAEs for such a search, implies that typical z >~ 6 LAEs are likely to have significantly lower CO line luminosities than massive sub-mm galaxies and hyperluminous infrared quasars at similar redshifts, due to either a significantly lower molecular gas content or a higher CO-to-H_2 conversion factor.